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I'm migrating from Apple to Linux - and feeling nervous. What have I forgotten?

Discussion in 'Other Operating Systems' started by Crewcut, May 22, 2020.

  1. Crewcut

    Crewcut New Member

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    Hi all,
    I've had 20 years on Apple iMacs (& equivalent) and am feeling nervous about my move to Linux Mint.

    First, backups.

    1. Cloud: - a copy of everything is going to Microsoft Onedrive (as I have a work 1TB account).
    2. External hard drive: this is where I need help.

    If I'm permanently moving from Apple in September (because they'll no longer support my 2011 iMac with security updates) to Linux Mint, how do I format the external hard drive so I can access it later? Apple wants to format hard drives a certain way. I'm not sure an apple hard drive will be readable by Linux Mint after I've installed it?

    Do I need to set up a Linux Mint virtual machine and control the external hard drive that way?

    Second, To Do list.

    I'm after a list of things to export, archive, backup and prepare for transition. So far I've thought of:-
    • Archive all MYOB files to archive drive as I'm moving to Xero in July.
    • Photos app and Pictures folder to archive drives.
    • EMAIL ARCHIVE
    • Address book contacts: select all my friends from address book and export into google or other Linux Mint app? Which app?
    • Write extensive documentation about where stuff is in my notes
    • Practice saving copies of Onenote to Word documents on my hard drive.
    • Export raw .dv files from imovie into system folders and drag across.
    • Drag across Personal folders, documents, PDF's, etc.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2020
  2. Elyzion

    Elyzion Member

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    I'm confused... are you moving to linux or a linux vm?
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Crewcut

    Crewcut New Member

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    Hi, sorry about that, I rewrote my OP to be clearer. As Apple have decided my 2011 iMac has reached end of life, I'm definitely looking at moving to Linux Mint as a permanent install.
     
  4. waltermitty

    waltermitty Member

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  5. waltermitty

    waltermitty Member

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    you should really decentralise your shit tho, don't keep everything on a laptop lol, cloud or a nas w backups
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Crewcut

    Crewcut New Member

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    I hear you - but isn't 2 backups enough? I've already got Microsoft Onedrive automatically syncing all my files, and now just want to have an on site, faster transfer hard drive for the big migrate back onto my iMac after I convert it to Linux. You a linux person? What would you do?
     
  7. waltermitty

    waltermitty Member

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    borg backup over ssh locally and to rsync.net, i re-install laptops on the reg and it takes 15 minutes coz i can blow away everything and rsync it back
     
    Crewcut likes this.
  8. flu!d

    flu!d KDE Neon 5.16

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    I would use KDE Neon as I'm really not a fan of Linux Mint and all are basically Ubuntu based (although KDE Neon is a little more of a rolling release DE) and I would download and install Insync once I'd installed my OS of choice and sync all OneDrive files over using Insync.

    Insync works a treat, I use it under Windows, MacOS and Linux. It's better then Google's own native client IMO.

    https://www.insynchq.com/
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Crewcut

    Crewcut New Member

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    There are of course ways to do it for free



     
  10. flu!d

    flu!d KDE Neon 5.16

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    Insync works so well I have no problem paying their small fee for it. In doing so good software doesn't become abandonware.

    My whole business runs under Gsuite and Insync is a big part of that.

    My idea of free is being able to use my PC the way I want, to make it work the way I want, to be controlled by no one but myself.
     
    Crewcut likes this.
  11. OP
    OP
    Crewcut

    Crewcut New Member

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    I can't say I disagree with any of that!
     
    flu!d likes this.
  12. flu!d

    flu!d KDE Neon 5.16

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    When it comes to something as important as reliable ongoing cloud based data syncing, I've been using Insync for about five years now without a single issue.

    Furthermore, they're great people. I sent them an email asking why their software was making use of my NVIDIA GPU and they answered promptly in a friendly manner and their reply made perfect sense.

    I'll happily support that.

    I used to use YakYak for Google Hangouts support, and the software is great. The problem is the developer has lost interest and the quality of the software is degrading. I'd happily pay a small fee for ongoing reliable support.
     
  13. demiurge3141

    demiurge3141 Member

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    Backup to network drive so you won't to worry about formatting.
     
  14. chip

    chip Member

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    What was the answer?
     
  15. flu!d

    flu!d KDE Neon 5.16

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    "we use Qt5, and the QtWebEngine will use the GPU when available."
     
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  16. OP
    OP
    Crewcut

    Crewcut New Member

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    OK, newbie question - I have a few 1TB hard drives. Is it possible to set them up as network drives? What makes a drive a network drive as opposed to just an external hard drive? Is it running some kind of special software? If so, there's got to be a Linux version, right? Linux running 1/3rd of all internet servers and all that...
     
  17. OP
    OP
    Crewcut

    Crewcut New Member

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    When you find something that fits a need, and it's a one off payment, AND they give good customer service!? Sounds like a win!
    (Also they're not one of those annoying subscriptions that will really add up over time like my annoying move from MYOB - which I owned from back in the day - to Xero! That was the cheapest Onetouch compatible software I could find that meets ATO requirements!)
     
  18. demiurge3141

    demiurge3141 Member

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    It means you keep them on a dedicated file server connected to your network. It's good practice to separate your data from your operating system in any case.
     
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  19. OP
    OP
    Crewcut

    Crewcut New Member

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    I've got everything up in Microsoft Onedrive with a work 365 account I get to use.
    I guess I was also hoping to do something similar with a few external 1TB hard drives at home - I'll have to google how to turn them into servers I can access from any OS. I like your thinking!
     
  20. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    The "exFAT" file system can be written to and read by both macOS and Linux (and Windows). If you want to migrate data between OSes, this is your most universal option.

    Does it have to be an app? You mentioned Google - are you using a GMail account? If so, that has a contacts manager, and means your contacts are safe even if your machine blows up.

    You need some sort of hardware+software combo to plug these drives into and make them accessible over the network. That could be another computer, a Raspberry Pi, or some sort of vendor supplied NAS like QNAP, Synology, etc.

    But generally speaking you want NAS devices to have some sort of redundancy (RAID or RAID-like next gen filesystems). You can certainly just have a single drive in your NAS if you want, but if it has hardware faults or data corruption, you're risking your data.

    There's an effort/cost trade off here. Building a network file server in Linux is non-trivial, TrueNAS Core (was FreeNAS) makes it a little easier but requires a little more specific hardware, and buying a vendor supplied product costs money. Which one you choose will depend on knowledge/skill/budget.

    Broadly speaking, Samba offers the SMB protocol for file sharing, which is supported by Linux, Mac and Windows. Samba runs on both FreeNAS core and Linux, should either of those appeal to you. Most vendor supplied devices (QNAP/Synology/etc) bundle it in by default with a pretty GUI to make management easy.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2020

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