In today's BS Junk Science news...

Discussion in 'Science' started by Goth, Sep 6, 2007.

  1. Goth

    Goth Grumpy Member

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    http://www.denmark.dk/en/servicemen...ws/MagneticRefrigeratorNeedsNoElectricity.htm

     
  2. Commie_Mike

    Commie_Mike Member

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    Is this for real? I'm no physicyst so i've no idea myself...
     
  3. Bearz

    Bearz Member

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    Can some explain what 'thermodynamically reversed' means? Is that just like saying the heat is 'made cold'?
     
  4. chip

    chip Member

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    I think it may have lost a little in the translation along the researcher --> reporter pathway, and even more when translated into english.

    What they're actually working on applications of the magnetocaloric phenomena. The implication that you're somehow getting 'free' cooling is absurd.

    Science reporting in the general media is incredibly depressing, don't you think? Things like mucking around with reversing Van der Waals interactions become "omg LEVITATION HARRY POTTER FLYING", and this becomes "FREE COOLING!".
     
  5. Zylatis

    Zylatis Member

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    yeh as far as i can see from this article its a load of wank. heating stuff by friction caused by magnetic fields: check. heat flow with water: check. using a heat engine cycle to compress something to cool it (thermodynamics): check.

    Using magnetics to heat shit then move the heat somewhere else = fridge: errr no
     
  6. daztay

    daztay Member

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    Hot and cold are potential energy. So this makes free energy?
    BS
     
  7. Foliage

    Foliage Member

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    At least it doesn't use perpetual motion.
     
  8. indy75

    indy75 Member

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    thats what i was thinking....

    i think that they are saying it's 60% more efficient, but they do state that it requires no electricity in the title....:confused:
     
  9. chip

    chip Member

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    In this case they is a journalist who would probably be out of their depth on a wet pavement, let alone covering obscure scientific phenomena. Hence the logical absurdities.
     
  10. eviladrian

    eviladrian Member

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    Ugh, imagine if a newspaper hired a sports writer who didn't know anything about sports...
    "So while your team was trying to get this football to the other end of the field, the other team actually grabbed and knocked over the man carrying the ball? The nerve of some people!"
     
  11. SLATYE

    SLATYE SLATYE, not SLAYTE

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    Yes, I think you're right. It sounds like the scientists here are just using magnetic refrigeration but they've extended it into something which could be commercially viable reasonably soon. The Wikipedia article explains it nicely.

    The journalist has probably figured that magnets = no electricity = no power input = free energy.

    EDIT: My guess at what actually happened.

    Scientist: We apply a magnetic field to increase the temperature of the material.

    Journalist: The new method uses opposing magnetic fields to increase the temperature of the materials employed.

    Scientist: The material is cooled back down to ambient temperature with water cooling or something similar.

    Journalist: The heat energy is transported through a non-volatile fluid, such as water...

    Scientist: The magnetic fields get turned off, resulting in the material cooling down to below the ambient temperature.

    Journalist: ...and then thermodynamically reversed to a cold temperature.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2007
  12. RnR

    RnR Member

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  13. Smoke87

    Smoke87 Member

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    No they are not.

    "Hot" is simply energy caused by friction, caused by motion.

    "Cold" is an absence of "hot" / heat, and is NOT an energy, and this does NOT mean there is any "potential energy"....

    /sigh
     
  14. Zylatis

    Zylatis Member

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    I dunno if id call hot friction, but temperature is defined as average kinetic energy. not just motion but random thermal motion in all directions allowed by the degrees of freedom.

    so basically youre half right :p but yeh this article is a load of wank.
     

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