1. OCAU Merchandise is available! Check out our 20th Anniversary Mugs, Classic Logo Shirts and much more! Discussion in this thread.
    Dismiss Notice

IPEX Convergence

Discussion in 'Retro & Arcade Worklogs' started by DonutKing, Dec 7, 2021.

  1. DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,596
    Location:
    Tweed/Gold Coast
    I recently saw /invariance\ giving away some IPEX P4 boxes in the retro for sale section. (Thanks heaps dude!) I was thinking about putting together a 98/XP rig for retro gaming and these boxes seemed too good to go to waste.

    It's a Pentium 4, which to many is in that weird realm of 'not old enough to be interesting' and 'not new enough to be useful'. For me, the appeal was that back in 2003 or so where this system dates from, I was finishing school and starting my first job. I finally had some disposable cash and I was going to spend it on my own PC instead of using my family's ancient Pentium 2. I was poring over computer mags like Atomic and PCPP, and reading websites like Tom's Hardware and Anandtech dreaming about the 1337 rig I was going to put together. AMD and Intel fanboys were waging war on forums and I was firmly in the AMD camp. It was a pretty nostalgic time for me.

    I ended up buying an Athlon XP 1800+ and never owned a Pentium 4. My case was painted black, covered in stickers, and had 3 fans plus the CPU and GPU fan. My parents would comment on how late I was staying up because they could hear the whine of the fans through 2 closed doors. Thinking back I don't know how they or I put up with it.

    It's also interesting as a bit of history; IPEX was a major PC company in Australia until they were acquired and eventually wound down in the late 00's.

    Anyway, $30 with Sendle and I had it in my hot little hands. It arrived within a day of getting picked up which I was pretty impressed with, so here's a +1 for Sendle.

    [​IMG]

    A few little dings and scrapes here and there as expected for its age but overall pretty tidy. I like how the ugly CD and floppy drives are hidden behind the blue bezel.

    [​IMG]

    It comes with a Pentium 4 HT 2.8GHz and 2x 512MB sticks of CL2.5 DR400. No hard drive but I can sort that out easily enough.

    It is REALLY TIDY on the inside, no rust/corrosion and barely any trace of dust anywhere - I wonder if this was even used or it just sat in a corner and never turned on for 15 odd years?

    First thing I noticed is that bulging cap in the centre of the board, but I knew it had some bad caps before I got it. Pulled out the board for a closer look:

    [​IMG]

    Again, really nice and tidy. It seems to have stereo speakers in the front plus USB and audio jacks just on the side of the bezel, which is pretty neat. I'm fairly pressed for space and swap rigs around a lot so being able to plug stuff into the side instead of reaching around the back is a plus; and it won't encroach on keyboard and mouse space like it would if the plugs were in the front.
    The black boxy thing is just a shroud for the CPU fan.
    Did I mention how clean it was?

    I counted 4 visibly bulging caps, I plan to replace those and any others of the same type. This was also a good opportunity to test out this new capacitor ESR meter:

    [​IMG]

    This thing checks the resistance of the capacitor, and has a graph showing worst-case ratings for various types of capacitor.
    e.g. if you have a 1000uF 16V cap, its ESR should be no more than 0.09 ohms and ideally a bit lower. If your cap reads higher than that it should be replaced.
    The best part about it is that you can test caps in-circuit without removing them from the board.

    Interestingly it did say that some of the bulging caps were 'good cap with low ESR'; maybe their resistance is too low because the electrolyte has dried up? Usually it will tell you the highest capacitance value for a 25V cap based on the current reading.

    Anyway I counted about 11 caps all up that I plan to replace; pretty much all the physically larger ones.
    I tested all the smaller ones and they came up OK and none of them had any visible damage so I'll leave those for now.

    I also opened up the PSU and spotted some more bulging caps:

    [​IMG]

    The two big ones up the top tested fine, there are half a dozen 2200uF caps along the bottom that I will rip out and replace. The two smaller ones in the middle tested OK so I'll leave them.
    Again this is really tidy, no dust in the PSU at all! It's like a brand new PC (minus the bulging caps of course).

    So that's it for now; I've started scrounging some bits for the build and I've put in my order at element14 for a new set of rubycon caps. Hoping they arrive before Christmas so I have a project to work on over the holidays. :)
     
  2. /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    1,233
    Location:
    Brisbane
    It is a shame some of the caps are drying out as I would speculate that it (and the remaining units) haven't been turned on for some 10 years and before that may have been used for 15mins once a fortnight.
    They were in a cupboard in an office, really hard life :lol:
    Hope you manage to have enough space to keep the box to protect it when not in use as it was made (shameless plug coming....) off of my "Cardboard Packing Boxes for Vintage equipment" thread. ;)
     
    DonutKing likes this.
  3. OP
    OP
    DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,596
    Location:
    Tweed/Gold Coast
    The caps are no problem - I've recapped plenty of boards and I was looking for a holiday project anyway. In fact if you don't get any takers over the next couple of months I might grab another one and fix it up too...

    I did notice the IPEX sticker on the box, I thought that was a nice touch :)
    [​IMG]
     
    adz likes this.
  4. badmofo

    badmofo Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2011
    Messages:
    1,844
    Location:
    Australia
    That's quite a handsome machine and super clean, which you neglected to mention. I've come across a few Ipex bits over the years and they were always decent quality, particularly the 486 with a great ASUS motherboard and Cirrus VLB VGA card.

    Looking forward to seeing what you do with it :thumbup:
     
    BiggusDickus and DonutKing like this.
  5. OP
    OP
    DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,596
    Location:
    Tweed/Gold Coast
    My caps arrived this week so I attacked the power supply:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Out with the old and in with the new!

    [​IMG]

    My tester tells me this one was was definitely no good:

    [​IMG]

    Interestingly the 6 bad caps in the power supply were all 2200uF but there was a mix of 6.3v, 10v and 16v. The 16v ones all tested OK, the others were bad. I've replaced them all with new 2200uF 16v caps.

    and... it's alive! all the voltages checked out OK.

    [​IMG]

    One thing I did discover though, and I should have checked this earlier... this PSU is only 200W. That's pretty low for a P4. In particular its only got 10A on the 12V rail. Northwood P4's are pretty hungry for 12V... it's probably fine for a barebones office system with no expansion cards but for what I'm planning this will be cutting it pretty close. I'll give it a go and see what happens.

    [​IMG]

    The PSU is SFX form factor, I have a couple of spare ATX PSU's but there's not enough space inside the case to fit them. I also considered ripping the board out of an ATX PSU and retrofitting it inside the SFX PSU shell but none of the PSU's I have will fit this way.

    Worst case is I can just hang an ATX PSU out the back and feed the cables into the case. Ugly but it will work until I can get another SFX PSU.

    I had hoped to one day track down a Gallatin core P4 extreme edition, I will definitely need a new PSU before that happens.
     
    FIREWIRE1394, adz, Pierre32 and 2 others like this.
  6. OP
    OP
    DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,596
    Location:
    Tweed/Gold Coast
    Attacked the motherboard yesterday evening.

    First I thought I'd pull the copper heatsink off as its heavy and would get in the way of replacing the caps around the CPU socket.

    It still had the original thermal pad between the heatsink and CPU and had gone hard as a rock. I tried to ease it out of the socket but it wasn't letting go easily.
    Normally I would try to rotate the heatsink to loosen its grip on the CPU but the retention clip made that impossible.
    I also didn't want to hit it with the heat gun for fear of melting the plastic retention clip.

    After a bit of gentle easing it sounded like the thermal gunk was starting to let go - unfortunately this was not the case, rather the sound was of the CPU getting ripped out of the socket!
    [​IMG]

    After citing several profanities it turns out the pins on the CPU were all straight and there was no apparent damage to the socket either. The CPU still sits in the socket fine and doesn't fall out.
    I cleaned up the old thermal goop with Isocol.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    After that I got on to replacing those dodgy caps.

    [​IMG]

    These guys around the CPU socket gave me heaps of trouble. It looks like they are connected to big copper planes on the back of the board, which seemed to draw a lot of the heat away. While trying to remove the old caps a couple of their legs snapped off and were stuck in the hole. I ended up having to hit them with the heat gun and solder sucker several times, it took me quite a while.

    [​IMG]


    Anyway, finally got all the caps replaced, and reassembled the system.

    I'd also been digging through my box-o-bits and found a pair of 256MB CL2.5 DDR400 sticks, so stuck them in as well. This brings the total up to 1.5GB.

    [​IMG]

    Finally the moment of truth - hit the power button and it whirred to life! :leet:

    [​IMG]

    I stuck in Ultimate Boot CD and left it running Memtest86+ for a few loops, and it hasn't complained so far. So it looks like we're good to go with the OS install, I need to dig through my box-o-bits for a few odds and ends first.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. badmofo

    badmofo Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2011
    Messages:
    1,844
    Location:
    Australia
    Nice work - de-soldering those suckers that have their legs in a big chunk of material is always a pain. I was doing some recently with my new solder / desolder station and ended up with the soldering iron on one side and the desolder gun on the other which seemed ridiculous - it's never as easy as it looks on the YouTubes.
     
    Vanne and DonutKing like this.
  8. OP
    OP
    DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,596
    Location:
    Tweed/Gold Coast
    The system is finally coming together now.

    First up is a hard disk, as the original was long gone.
    I found this 120GB SATA3 SSD that I didn't know I had, I probably got it for an old laptop and must have had the foresight to keep the SSD once the laptop was finally gotten rid of.

    [​IMG]

    This board does have SATA1 ports. I have heard that early SATA can be a bit troublesome, but thought it would be worth a go. It should offer good performance given that this SSD would have been orders of magnitude faster than anything on the market back when this system was new. Less time waiting for windows to boot and games to load can only be a good thing!

    The lower power usage of the SSD compared to a spinning disk is a positive too, given my concerns about the 200W power supply. This SSD says it only draws from the 5V rail which frees up a bit of the 10A limit on the 12V rail. The PSU didn't have a SATA power connector but I did find a 4-pin molex to SATA adapter which solves that problem.
    The other issue was that the SSD is 2.5" and there are no 2.5" drive bays inside the case... again I rummaged through my magical box of bits and found a 3.5" > 2.5" adapter.

    The SSD is going to be the only 'period incorrect' part of the system but given the advantages I reckon I'll still sleep soundly at night.

    The next bit to go in is this Audigy 2 ZS sound card:

    [​IMG]

    This was a pretty damn good sound card back in 2003/2004. It lacks good DOS compatibility but that isn't a big worry as I've got other rigs for that purpose. IIRC I actually had one of these cards around that time as well. This will also give me hardware audio and EAX support which was pretty common for games in that time period, and is something that has gone the way of the dodo in the present time.


    Finally the pièce de résistance (I had to google that and copy/paste it to get the accents) - An ATI Radeon 9800 Pro 128MB:

    [​IMG]


    I had originally planned to use a Geforce 4 Ti4600 in this build but on a whim I searched Gumtree and came across this boxed 9800 Pro. The bloke wanted $75 so I messaged and asked if it worked, he responded that he doesn't know, so I offered $60 plus postage. He asked for my address then sent a payment request for $60... while I could have 'done the right thing' and explained that I was willing to pay for postage myself, the allure of saving myself $12.70 was too great and I held my silence.

    I'm pretty happy with this as it's more period correct and I had a similar video card myself at the time. The fan was pretty filthy so a quick brush was in order before sticking it in the PC, where it booted up first try!

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    We've made good progress so far so now it was time to install the OS.

    I've decided on a Windows ME and XP dual boot system. ME for the odd older game that doesn't work with XP, and also because I've never actually tried ME. I would have otherwise used Windows 98SE but given that iMic recently put together a massive update compilation CD I figured why not give it a bash.
    The main OS will be XP because that's more period correct and what I was running around this time.

    So this turned out to be an exercise in frustration.

    First up, since its a 120GB disk it's too big for ME to see properly. the version of format included in windows ME didn't like it, although it would create a partition in fdisk, it couldn't be formatted. What I ended up doing was booting the Windows XP CD and using that to create the partitions. I made a 30GB FAT32 partition for Windows ME and made the rest of the disk NTFS for Windows XP.

    Once that was done I was able to install WinME:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Unfortunately this first attempt wasn't so great. Immediately I started getting an ominous error message:

    [​IMG]

    Once I went into the BIOS and enabled Legacy IDE mode, this seemed to settle down.
    Then I started off installing the Intel chipset drivers, all went well; then tried installing the ATI Catalyst drivers and things went south. On every boot I got an error message that there wasn't enough memory to run the application and couldn't go any further. I couldn't even boot into safe mode, the mouse and keyboard would stop working as soon as explorer loaded.

    So round 2, wiped the FAT32 partition and reinstalled. Things went a bit smoother this time, I still installed the intel chipset drivers but then I used iMic's update compilation and installed the unofficial >512MB memory patch. After doing that and restarting, then installing the rest of the updates, I tried the ATI catalyst drivers again and didn't have any problems this time!

    I then wasted a bit of time trying to install the unoffical AHCI patch. I was running the SATA adapter in Legacy mode and figured this patch would let me disable that. Well, I couldn't get it to work using the instructions provided. Turns out the 865 chipset (specifically the ICH5 southbridge) doesn't support AHCI; that wasn't supported until SATA2. So there was no need to install this patch after all.

    Then I installed the intel NIC driver and the USB2 driver, no issues there. The Audigy 2 ZS drivers were a a massive pain in the arse.

    First up the driver installer wouldn't recognize the card at all. So I tried manually installing by adding hardware through the device manager and pointing to the INF files on the installer CD. That worked but it installed the WDM drivers which have a fairly bad reputation in Win9x/ME. I didn't have any problems immediately but I found that in DOS games I would get loud popping after every digital sound was played.

    I then tried extracting the VxD drivers from a CAB file on the CD which worked but then I had no sound at all in DOS games.

    A search on Vogons led me to this topic which explained the magical incantations required to properly install the VxD drivers with DOS compatibility on Windows 9x/ME.
    This worked a treat, the only issue I had was installing the audigy DOS drivers, the installer kept telling me it needed windows 95 or 98. I removed a suspicious looking checkOS.exe file from the installer directory and it allowed me to proceed.

    With that I finally had a fully working working Windows ME install! I gave 3dMark 2001SE a run, it went through without a hitch:

    [​IMG]


    During this process I was keeping my eye on the CPU temperature in the BIOS hardware monitor, it was idling in the high 40's and getting up to high 50's after heavy load. The system only has the one fan in the power supply which it relies on to draw cool air in from the other side of the case across the northbridge and CPU heatsink. I scrounged through my magical box of bits again and found a 5 1/4" drive bay fan module:

    [​IMG]

    The box of bits certainly punched above its weight this time around. I'm not normally this fortunate when I'm trying to find bits; maybe I should buy a lotto ticket...

    The drive bracket inside the case only had a screw hole on one side. On the other side it had a screw hole on the bottom rather than on the side. Presumably this would work for most 5 1/4" drives but this fan module only had threaded holes on the sides. I drilled a hole on the underside to line up with the hole on the drive bracket which solved the problem:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    I think it looks a bit naff but it does seem to have helped lower the CPU temperature by about 5 degrees. Most of the air will be blowing on the GPU which is only a good thing, I hadn't really given the GPU a real workout yet so presumably it would get pretty toasty under full load.

    I'm thinking to take the drive blanking plate down to the paint shop and get it colour matched then paint the front of the fan module; that can wait until after christmas though!

    And now on to windows XP :leet:
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2021
    FIREWIRE1394, Vanne, Pierre32 and 6 others like this.
  9. OP
    OP
    DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,596
    Location:
    Tweed/Gold Coast
    Well the IPEX system itself has been working beautifully... all the other gear I've been trying to use it with, not so much.

    Since the last update Windows XP Home SP1 was installed without a hitch.
    went with Home because this system has a licence key sticker on the case for it. I went with SP1 because that matches with the time period I was aiming for with this system. I also don't want to be nagged by the windows security centre that was added in SP2. I can always install SP2/3 later if I need it.

    I didn't have any issues with drivers, and it detected Windows ME and setup a boot menu automatically. The whole thing was pretty smooth.

    I also bought a 19" Sony Trinition G420 - I'd actually agreed to buy it off a mate ages ago but because we lived on opposite sides of the QLD/NSW border I couldn't actually go and pick it up until now.

    [​IMG]

    It's an awesome monitor! It's noticeably bigger than the 17" I was using and a lot heavier too - according to the spec sheets it weights 25kg! The 17" monitor only weighs 15kg. I ended up moving it off the top of the system because I was worried about it bowing in the top of the case, or making contact with the graphics and sound card.

    Once all the drivers were installed I gave it a run with 3dMark 2001SE. Interestingly, I gained about 2000 points straight off the bat in XP compared to ME with an otherwise identical setup, even using the same versions of the ATI Catalyst driver:

    [​IMG]

    I also gave 3dMark 2003 a run, I couldn't get this to work on WinME.

    [​IMG]

    Then it was time to enjoy the fruits of my labour and play some games!

    Call of Duty:
    [​IMG]

    C&C Generals:
    [​IMG]

    Simcity 4:
    [​IMG]

    (On a related note, I don't miss having to type in these silly codes when installing a game - I guess we can thank Steam for that)
    [​IMG]

    And finally one of the games I've spent the most hours in ever, Morrowind:
    [​IMG]


    Unfortunately this is where the story takes a tragic turn. I played through a couple hours of Call of Duty and was getting artifacts. Left it overnight and had another go, more artifacts and then a crash (no video but sound was still playing). I also had a weird intermittent issue where the screen would wobble horizontally, and the edge of the image wasn't straight but was going wavy.

    Opened up the case and the Radeon 9800 was super hot. I decided to change over the thermal paste in the hopes this would fix it.

    Here's the card with the heatsink removed, the old thermal paste was almost like chalk:
    [​IMG]

    Cleaned it up with isocol, put on some new paste and refitted the heatsink.
    [​IMG]

    This seemed to help a lot. The card was still getting really hot though almost too hot to touch but I wasn't getting the artifacts like I was before. The wobbly screen issue was still happening intermittently though.

    I'd mentioned before that I was worried about the 200W power supply, but I'm fairly confident that its not an issue. I haven't had any hard lockups or reboots like I would expect with a power supply issue. Voltages all seemed to be stable under load.

    I found a new VGA cooler on AliExpress that is compatible with my card and the price was agreeable too:
    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32910546780.html?
    [​IMG]

    Hopefully this will be a big improvement over the stock heatsink. I am a bit worried about the lack of vertical clearance inside the case, I might have to bend or trim some of the fins on top of the cooler to fit inside with the lid closed.

    I figured the wobbly screen was related to heat but it seemed to be getting worse to the point where it wouldn't stop. I swapped over the VGA lead and this didn't help. The next time I unplugged the VGA lead I noticed the monitor OSD was doing the wobbly dance as well. So it was a problem with the monitor, not the graphics card!

    Sadly my worst fears were confirmed, my sexy new-to-me CRT monitor that I'd been anticipating for months had a fault :upset::upset::upset:

    I swapped back over to my 17" CRT and so far the system has been working fine. I've no idea what the problem with the Sony monitor is, I was too frustrated to deal with it so its sitting in the corner with its face against the wall. I'll worry about it next year. I'm hoping its an easy fix like a recap, but poking around inside CRT's scares me.
     
    FIREWIRE1394 and Vanne like this.
  10. badmofo

    badmofo Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2011
    Messages:
    1,844
    Location:
    Australia
    Great progress so far but man it's frustrating when things don't go to plan. On the other hand though the project timeline is extended

    That Sony is the business, I hope it comes good.
     
    DonutKing likes this.
  11. OP
    OP
    DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,596
    Location:
    Tweed/Gold Coast
    Over the last couple of days I've managed to open up the new Sony monitor and discharge the tube without killing myself.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    This is the first time I've ever discharged a tube so I was sketching out about it... I was wearing rubber gloves and thongs but overall it was pretty uneventful. I suspect since this is a late model CRT it has a bleeder resistor to discharge the tube while its unplugged.

    It was absolutely filthy inside so I gave it a good blow out. No obviously bad/leaking caps or loose connections.

    There is a little bit of green corrosion here and there, probably to be expected for something that has spent 20 years in a coastal environment. It doesn't look like its eaten through anything, hopefully its just superficial.
    [​IMG]

    I spent a good few hours testing every electrolytic cap I could find with my ESR meter and found about a dozen that were out of spec. I've ordered replacements which will take a couple of weeks to arrive. Fingers crossed this sorts it out (because otherwise I'm out of ideas!)

    [​IMG]

    On another note my new GPU heatsink/fan arrived from China
    [​IMG]

    Looks like the package took a bit of a knock because some of the fins were a little bent but this was easily resolved by bending them back.
    I noticed that the contact patch for the GPU core is quite rough, the original one was quite smooth. I may have to lap it if temperatures are still a problem.

    Swapping them over was pretty straight forward.
    The old one:
    [​IMG]
    The new one:
    [​IMG]

    I was pleased to see that the heatsink wasn't too tall to fit in the case, but I had the opposite problem. The fan was rubbing on the PCI slot next to the AGP slot!
    I ended up filing down the corner of the PCI slot, no so much that any contacts are exposed but just enough to give the fan the clearance it needs.
    [​IMG]


    I'm yet to give it a solid gaming session but I'm hoping this helps reduce the GPU temperature a bit.
     
    BiggusDickus, Grant, adz and 2 others like this.
  12. OP
    OP
    DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,596
    Location:
    Tweed/Gold Coast
    I'd like to post a positive update but unfortunately I've hit a wall.

    The PC itself is going fine. I can't work out the fault with the monitor.

    I've replaced the bad caps which didn't make any difference.

    I've inspected the board and can't locate any bad solder joints. In fact the solder on this board is in excellent condition, it flows really easily and doesn't seem tarnished much at all. On most boards of this vintage the solder is quite stubborn to move and I usually have to add some new solder to get it flowing, not so with this board.

    20220122_150259.jpg

    Since the fault is intermittent and seems to only happen once it warms up, I bought a can of freezer spray and tried hitting a few components while it was running.

    I thought the HOT (Horizontal Output Transistor) could be at fault, so I hit that a couple of times while it was faulting but it made no difference. I tried a few different components but nothing seemed to have any effect.
    Interesting to note that it took much longer to start faulting while the case was off, which definitely points to a heat related issue.

    The only thing that made any difference was a couple of caps near the flyback transformer, when I hit them with the spray it would make the screen zoom in then slowly zoom out... interesting but I doubt its related to the problem.

    I was trying to put the board on its side outside the chassis, so I can spray the underside while its running but the internal cables seem a bit too short to do this... the service manual mentions a test harness with a Sony part number. Maybe that's what I need but good luck finding one of those.

    So I'm out of ideas.

    I was about to admit defeat and condemn this monitor to the corner of the shed for 'too good to throw away' things when I mentioned it to a co-worker. He said he drives past an old TV repair guy who still has the sign out the front of his house which is only about 25 minutes drive away. So he passed on the number, I gave him a call.
    At first I asked if he repairs computer monitors and he said, 'nah don't want to know about it, just buy a new one unless its something really special'. I said it was an old trinitron CRT and he says 'Ohhh? well I'm 59 and I grew up with all those...' So we got chatting for a bit and he agreed to take a look at it for me.

    So let's see what happens, Hoping it will be a fairly simple fix, and he will be a good contact for any future repairs I need, and maybe I can even pick his brain and learn a few things off him!
     
  13. Pierre32

    Pierre32 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2019
    Messages:
    1,906
    Location:
    Sydney
    Getting a contact like that might be the silver lining out of this! Hopefully he has some success.
     
  14. Vanne

    Vanne Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2003
    Messages:
    3,416
    Location:
    DXB.. mostly.
    Good luck with the monitor, how did you go with the temps on that 9800pro? i have the exact same card, and i find it runs really hot too. Did that new fan bring the temps down at all?
     
  15. OP
    OP
    DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,596
    Location:
    Tweed/Gold Coast
    The card doesn't have a temperature probe as far as I know, but it does appear to have brought the temperature down a bit. At least I'm not getting the artifacting like I used to.


    The monitor is still at the shop, he did say it might be a couple of weeks before he could look at it so... waiting patiently for the call and hoping it will be good news :)
     
  16. OP
    OP
    DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,596
    Location:
    Tweed/Gold Coast
    Sadly here is where the story ends. I called the repair guy today to enquire about progress on my monitor after 2 months. I had wanted to call him weeks ago but then the floods tore through northern NSW and I know that this fellow's street got hit. I decided to give him a few weeks before I called because he's probably got other shit to deal with right now.

    My fears were confirmed and the monitor went underwater in the floods and had been disposed of.

    I can't begrudge the bloke, it came less than 30cm from getting in the upstairs level of his house. He lost heaps of stuff, most of his tools including a 100mhz oscilloscope he'd had for 30 years. He hadn't been able to contact me because he'd lost all his records as well, he'd been waiting for customers to call him to give them the bad news. The water just came in so fast he didn't have time to get much upstairs.

    He did have a look at it before it went under and he seemed to think the issue was internal to the flyback transformer. He was fairly certain it wasn't a bad solder joint or loose connection or any other component. It would have been pretty difficult to find a replacement flyback, so odds are this monitor wasn't going to be fixed.

    So there you have it. For a brief couple of days I was a proud owner of a glorious 19" Trinitron :)
     
    BiggusDickus and Vanne like this.
  17. Pierre32

    Pierre32 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2019
    Messages:
    1,906
    Location:
    Sydney
    Ugh, that's a real bummer. And you really have to feel for the guy, not only losing his own stuff but the stress of having to break that news to everyone.
     
  18. Vanne

    Vanne Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2003
    Messages:
    3,416
    Location:
    DXB.. mostly.
    hope old mate is okay and can re-setup his lab.
     
  19. gelousi

    gelousi Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2016
    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I love ipex pc’s I have an ipex 386,486 p1/2/3/4 in my collection can’t get enough of them!
     
  20. Vanne

    Vanne Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2003
    Messages:
    3,416
    Location:
    DXB.. mostly.
    Can't believe my 21 inch Sgi branded Trinitron's went on the road... Darn you council cleanups!!!
     

Share This Page

Advertisement: