IPv6 LAN IPv4 Internet

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by thefatdx, Apr 20, 2013.

  1. thefatdx

    thefatdx Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2003
    Messages:
    770
    Location:
    Mount Waverley, Vic
    I'm looking to implement native IPv6 on my home network with a current IPv4 internet connection, as Telstra Cable doesn't provide IPv6.

    I'm struggling to find any information on it at all, every Google search returns "Tunnel Broker". Accessing IPv6 hosts on the internet with an IPv4 public address isn't my goal, I just want it on my LAN with no Dual-Stack configurations.

    My knowledge of IPv6 isn't the greatest which is one of the reason i want to run it internally at home, it seems to be the fastest way i learn things when i see it actually running instead of reading theory.

    I'm getting stuck where I would perform some kind of "NAT" I'm guessing, where the router communicates via IPV4 and translates the address to IPV6 on my LAN.

    So it would look like this

    IPV6 LAN ---> IPV6 interface on Router <--> "Some Kind of Address/Protocol Translation" <-->IpV4 interface on Router ---> IpV4 Internet

    Is what I'm thinking even possible?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 20, 2013
  2. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    40,322
    Location:
    Brisbane
  3. cs-cam

    cs-cam Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2007
    Messages:
    742
    Location:
    Brisbane, QLD
    Most of the current transition mechanisms that you can run as an end user are a bit shit. Things like DS Lite and MAP are better but are done on the ISP side. Plus they're better because they're not really NAT.

    If you want to try IPv6 on your LAN then link-local addresses are an easy way to get started, most of your devices probably already have one. You could generate a ULA prefix and use that, if you don't get a default gateway your hosts will still use v4 to get out to the internet.

    Don't try to replace IPv4 with IPv6, use them both side by side.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    thefatdx

    thefatdx Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2003
    Messages:
    770
    Location:
    Mount Waverley, Vic
    That doesn't seem to be what I'm looking for, from the couple of hours of reading and experimenting (I could be getting heavily confused) 6to4 allows me to communicate with other IPV6 networks traversing an IPV4 network. In my case I just want to run IPV6 internally and use IPV4 for internet.

    The solution I found that seemed to cater for me was NAT64 http://www.litech.org/tayga/

    But the above being out-of-kernel (running OpenWRT on my router) and appearing to not of been updated for a few years has kinda put me off as cs-cam said:

     
  5. Gecko

    Gecko Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2004
    Messages:
    2,715
    Location:
    Sydney
    Realistically, the best way to handle IPv6 at the moment is to dual-stack (ie run both IPv4 and IPv6).

    Run your IPv4 out using IPv4 NAT as you would have been doing for years and use a tunnel broker to get IPv6 into your network.
     
  6. Heywood

    Heywood Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2001
    Messages:
    457
  7. akashra

    akashra Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2003
    Messages:
    3,802
    Location:
    Melbourne, AU
    It really isn't viable. Quite simply, even though the operating systems generally in wide use have support for it, most applications aren't even being written to handle v6. This makes all your effort basically futile, because there's going to be too many applications that still require v4.

    What bugs me is that with the huge takeup of smartphones, Apple and Google had the opportunity to say "right, we're going to make iOS and Android v6 only" - which would have massively helped and even forced takeup. Sadly, it didn't happen, so apps are still being written that break on v6.
     
  8. Heywood

    Heywood Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2001
    Messages:
    457
    IPv6 isn't new (documented in 1998)
    The original 3GPP spec specified IPv6 support for mobile handsets back in 1999
    The spec for IMS (introduced in Release 5 in 2002) was originally IPv6 only but then they backpedalled to making it optional

    This was well before the Apples and Googles of the world got into making mobile devices.

    I guess the difference before they got on the scene was that the network was driven by the Telcos, now it seems that user demand for specific handset variants does influence how the telcos engineer their networks, so what you say does have some bearing on the matter but there's probably too much fear in making it so your phone/tablet doesnt work on the WiFi at home/work so you pick the alternate handset vendor which is pretty close in features...
     

Share This Page

Advertisement: