JJJC's Subzero Insulation Guide (Lots of large images)

Discussion in 'Extreme and Water Cooling' started by jjjc_93, Aug 11, 2012.

  1. jjjc_93

    jjjc_93 Member

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    JJ's Subzero Insulation Guide

    I had a couple of people contact me a while back about my insulation methods, also know a few people have been interested in subzero memory insulation so thought I would throw up a quick guide of what I do. This is in no way a be all end all comprehensive guide. It's just a fast method that works flawlessly for me. In normal circumstances, this all takes me 10-15 minutes.

    I've played with a lot of setups in my time doing this, eraser, LET, eraser+LET, eraser+vas (Don't try that one at home) as well as others and have found my current method to be the fastest and simplest of them all. It's also easy to clean up. Today I will be insulating a Maximus V Formula for CPU and memory subzero.

    Things you will need:
    Vaseline
    Small paintbrush
    Paper Towels
    Closed cell foam
    Scissors, craft knife or anything else that will cut through foam
    Hair dryer (optional)

    [​IMG]

    Start by covering the socket area of the board in vaseline with a small paintbrush. You only need a thin layer, I've seen people pour a whole tub over their board before but you just risk it getting into your socket and causing issues that way. Thin layer or thick layer makes no difference, it repels water all the same.
    [​IMG]

    Here you can see the area I've covered in vaseline. If you're going to put a GPU under cold then you'll want to cover past the pci-e slot.
    [​IMG]

    This step isn't completely necessary, but I like to do it as it takes a few seconds and in theory should spread vas in to hard to reach spots and melt it all together as one layer. You don't want to have it so hot that it's dripping off your board, just so it softens up a bit.
    [​IMG]

    Same deal for the back of the board.
    [​IMG]

    To finish up the back I just have my mounting plate, a piece of foam and a single paper towel. You can layer it with more towels if you like, but I've found one to be enough.
    [​IMG]

    Now it's time to lay down some paper towels around the socket. I do this so that the cold from the pot doesn't directly touch the board, and it also soaks up any moisture that does come up.
    [​IMG]

    Rip, fold and push around to fit. Doesn't need to look pretty.
    [​IMG]

    You should end up with something like this. Again, you can layer more if you like, but I have found a single layer to be plenty in my setup. If you're going to have cold bug issues and need to go from subzero to positive temps then you'll want to lay down some extra as you'll constantly be melting the ice buildup.
    [​IMG]

    A piece of foam to hold it all down and seal it off a little. This one isn't a perfect fit but it works. I originally cut it up for a gigabyte 1156 board. Thermal paste has also been applied. Wiggle and turn the pot a bit as you mount to help spread.
    [​IMG]

    All mounted! Now I'm going to turn my attention to the memory. (Yes I did burn the hold down plate with a torch)
    [​IMG]

    Here's a shot of the ram I will be using. Not sure if you can see in the photo, but I have applied a thin layer of vaseline to the pcb and a very thin layer to the gold connections. Same method as the board, brush it on and hit it with a hairdryer.
    You might also notice that there's no label on the stick. They tend to peel or fall right off after freezing ram.
    [​IMG]

    Stick the ram in the slots. I haven't added any vaseline, just what I did when insulating for the CPU. Lay down some paper towel in the empty slots and around the immediate area to soak up any moisture that might come up.
    Not shown in this image is the temperature probe that you will need. Use something to attach a probe to the ram sink. I use a piece of keandable eraser as it sticks and lets the cold through.
    [​IMG]

    Here's my very awesome ram pot. Go into your kitchen and grab a sheet of tin foil. Fold it over and mold it to your ram. If you have a proper ram pot then this step is obviously not for you.
    [​IMG]

    I just go over the makeshift pot with a normal kitchen rag and lucky band. My rag isn't quite long enough to go around the whole thing, so I've just used a little paper towel at the back to cover it all up.
    [​IMG]

    That's it, you're done! The cold will spread from the mem pot and freeze the edge of your motherboard, but it doesn't cause me any problems. If you're going to melt it then mop it up with a paper towel as you do so.
    [​IMG]


    Any questions then please feel free to let me know, and I'll do my best to answer them. If you just want to view the gallery of images then here's the link: http://s1109.photobucket.com/albums/h437/JJJC_93/Subzdero Insulation Guide/

    Happy freezing guys!
    :D
     
  2. aeon.

    aeon. Member

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    very in-depth guide, maybe itll be a sticky 8D

    where did u get the foam though? did it come with the pot?

    and where exactly do u put the temperature probe?
     
  3. EbolaWarfare

    EbolaWarfare (Banned or Deleted)

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    Thanks heaps JJjc!
     
  4. OP
    OP
    jjjc_93

    jjjc_93 Member

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    I buy the foam from clark rubber. Think a half sheet costs me something around $15 and lasts me forever.

    Here's where the probe for the ram goes. The probe for the CPU goes into a predrilled hole in the pot.
    [​IMG]

    No problems. :thumbup:
     
  5. MDewMadOScar

    MDewMadOScar Member

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  6. Sahand

    Sahand Member

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    Very nice guide, great for beginners looking to get into this.


    :thumbup: i was thinking about doing it myself soon.
     
  7. EbolaWarfare

    EbolaWarfare (Banned or Deleted)

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    couple of quick ones.
    1- do you vas under the mosfet and pwm coolers? same goes for the pch i guess too for vga.

    2- have you ever had issues with ice around the I/O stuff at the end? long sessions i guess, same with power connectors?

    3- what sort of temps do you get to before booting for the first time? do you hit yours with a blowtorch and then pour heaps like ive seen people do in videos?
     
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    jjjc_93

    jjjc_93 Member

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    Good questions.

    1. I don't remove the board heatsinks when insulating, so that's a no. I know some people do like to, but that has never been an issue for me.

    2. Generally speaking I don't get much ice build up towards the I/O area, but I do get a lot of build up around the ATX power connection when I put my ram under LN2. Again not been an issue, if it starts melting, just wipe it up with a paper towel. If it makes you feel safer, then you can wrap the power connectors with a paper towel prior to benching. Essentially, if it's ice then it's not an issue. When it melts into water, then it can cause you problems.

    3. It heavily depends on what I'm benching. When benching Ivy, I boot at ambient temperatures and stock speeds/voltages. I go into bios and bring the CPU down to -70c while I change a few settings. I boot again, torch the pot and then bring it down to -180c once I've booted into windows. Torching the pot makes it more responsive to LN2 pours, meaning it cool down faster and with less LN2. (In my experience)
     
  9. EbolaWarfare

    EbolaWarfare (Banned or Deleted)

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    anything in particular you're looking for when you do torch the pot? or just for a couple of minutes and good to go?
     
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    jjjc_93

    jjjc_93 Member

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    The walls and base turn white with a thin layer of ice or frost. That's all I'm after. I don't torch it much longer than 20 seconds to get that.
     
  11. robbo2

    robbo2 Member

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    Great guide mate. Vote for sticky :thumbup:
     
  12. sugaris

    sugaris Member

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    +1 for this :thumbup:
     
  13. gazza30

    gazza30 Member

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    Great work thanks Jack :thumbup:
     
  14. azalin79

    azalin79 Member

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    nice little guide mate :thumbup:

    Certainly piqued my curiosity in dabbling in ln2 :)
     
  15. Jimba86

    Jimba86 Member

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    great guide, easy to understand.

    +1 also for sticky.

    nice work jack,keep it up.
     
  16. dirtyd

    dirtyd Member

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    15 posts in and no Vaseline jokes? Where's creekin? :Paranoid:
     
  17. EbolaWarfare

    EbolaWarfare (Banned or Deleted)

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    Away thankfully
     
  18. KonMan

    KonMan Member

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    Indeed, but you missed the paper towels and references to 'sticky'
     
  19. t8y

    t8y Member

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    nice guide, thread needs to be made a sticky for sure :thumbup:

    +1 to the mostly vaso method + foam, done last couple of boards like this and its heaps easier prep work, cleans off easy and assuming no stock stickers lost due to moisture*, potentially no warranties being voided ;)
    also tried the eraser + vaso, and agreed, that method leaves a hell of a mess.. :lol:

    only thing i'd add; dont forget to have plenty of airflow to help prevent the condensation buildup in the first place.. :)



    *happened to me recently, warranty rejected :upset: but that risk is all part of the fun :/
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2012
  20. EbolaWarfare

    EbolaWarfare (Banned or Deleted)

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    Didn't try gluing it on?
     

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