Kodak have begun shipping Ektachrome 100

Discussion in 'Photography & Video' started by Scootre, Sep 27, 2018.

  1. Scootre

    Scootre Member

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    RnR likes this.
  2. Frozen_Hell

    Frozen_Hell Member

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    None in medium format = meh. Missed opportunity if you ask me.
     
  3. waltermitty

    waltermitty Member

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    I've still got some 4x5 sheets of ektachrome in the fridge, nice film
     
  4. Athiril

    Athiril Member

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    I'm sure 120 will come, I think they did this with Ektar too inigially
     
  5. Deftone2k

    Deftone2k In the Darkroom

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    Give it time.. it was always going to be an initial run for 35mm and into 8 and 16mm formats

    At least its a step to new film coming out, better than everything being discontinued :)
     
  6. TwinII

    TwinII Member

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    Yeah - 120 format would be good - we'll see how it goes. I've got some Ektachrome 160T which I picked up a couple of years ago in the fridge. Not sure about shooting tungsten!
     
  7. Frozen_Hell

    Frozen_Hell Member

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    I probably actually would like a 400 ISO slide film more though. If I had some tungsten balanced film, I'd use it for shooting night time cityscapes!
     
  8. TwinII

    TwinII Member

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    Yeah I was thinking some night shots - I might put a roll through my 6x6 at some stage. I've got a box of Provia 400 which I am saving - I dont know what for - maybe some fireworks shots or something like that.
     
  9. ^catalyst

    ^catalyst Member

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    I have fond memories of shooting E100GX. I always found the E100 to be very sterile.
     
  10. Bion1c

    Bion1c Member

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    I ordered a couple of rolls to check it out. +1 for 120

    i'd love to see them re-release a 400 iso slide film.... but despite having a stockpile of provia 400 in 120, i rarely shoot it. slide film is just so unforgiving with exposure and a pita to scan
     
  11. Frozen_Hell

    Frozen_Hell Member

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    pita to scan?! Its easier to scan.... what you see is what you get, unlike colour negative where each type of film needs a different profile for the orange base. Unforgiving with exposure though I agree, and I almost exclusively use Velvia 50 at heavy reciprocity failure speeds all the time, a sucker for punishment you might say.
     
  12. Bion1c

    Bion1c Member

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    in theory it's incredibly easy. in reality:

    - Most scanners cant handle the density and/or their light source makes the results terrible (e.g. pakon, frontier, flatbeds). this is where drum scanners really shine... flextight seems like the next best option. Unfortunately we don't all have drum scanners lying around :(
    - It doesn't seem possible to capture the full gamut of the slide media. compare even a high end scan to the original on a lightbox, it's always a bit disappointing (imho)
    - Slide base always has a tint to it, even if its slight and you need to correct for that. Also, scanners aren't perfect capture devices. If this wasn't the case, IT8 targets and calibration wouldn't be a thing.

    It's definitely not impossible. But it is a pain to get the most out of it.

    I have a love/hate thing with slides. when they're good they're amazing but it gets so frustrating on the near misses..
     
  13. Frozen_Hell

    Frozen_Hell Member

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    Practically speaking, the Epson V700 and V800 flatbed scanners are decent enough at scanning, but they lack the sharpness/resolution. I've got a V800 (and previously had a V700), but I've also had stuff scanned on a Flextight when I wanted to print it big, and comparing the scans - the resolution is the biggest factor of improvement as well as probably minor improvements in colour gradations and the like.
     
  14. TwinII

    TwinII Member

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    Yeah - same (although Ive just run out so using Provia at the moment). It's all Ive ever really shot so I am aware of the challenges. I might find it easy to shoot other film stock - not sure!

    This is so true - when you get it, they're great. When you under or overexpose (even by half a stop) then you feel like you've wasted a whole heap of time and money! I still try to recover them as best I can...
     
  15. Frozen_Hell

    Frozen_Hell Member

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    Do you find that you always get the exposure wrong one way? For me if I miss the right exposure it is 99% under-exposed, I never seem to get it wrong and over-expose my shots. Well, that is unless I forgot to do something, like setting the aperture on the lens properly - I've done that once when I thought I had it set to F32 and in fact it was set to F8... I now double-check things before taking the shot as a result. :)
     
  16. TwinII

    TwinII Member

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    I do tend to under expose. I do remember I did have a series of rolls which I overexposed - it was a bit weird. I have been shooting with older (out of date) film so I tend to lean to longer rather than shorted shutter speeds. I did a trip around NSW last year and shot about 10 or 11 rolls - pretty much all of the shots were underexposed! I was so disappointed. I will have to buy some fresh velvia 50 some time soon - but I have some random films which I might shoot with to whittle down my stock first.
     
  17. HorrorLand

    HorrorLand Member

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    Bracket! Even did some velvia night shots without meter just bracketed a bunch of times /w reciprocity. Where is everybody getting theirs?

    Just get tango ;)
     
  18. TwinII

    TwinII Member

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    Nah - too expensive to bracket! I used to get film off ebay - I haven't for ages though. I thought I'd probably get some straight from B&H - but the exchange rate is not too good at the moment.
     
  19. HorrorLand

    HorrorLand Member

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    120 yes but 35mm I struggle to finish a roll anyway :p Will need to make a big order @ B&H once the aud comes up
     
  20. Frozen_Hell

    Frozen_Hell Member

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    I recently bought 50 rolls of Velvia 50 (120) from a Japanese seller on eBay, all with an expiry of 2019-12, paid on the Friday and delivered in my hands on the following Tuesday, so really quick. With postage and GST it was less than $400, which makes it just under $8/roll - was much cheaper than locally ($13.50/roll via Ikigai) and I think the cheapest from B&H or Adorama was about $550 or so all up for 50 rolls when I worked it out.

    Well, 4 shots on a roll of 120 ain't any struggle at all with 6x17 :p

    I took my recently re-acquired GX617 out last weekend for a sunrise, ended up shooting 4 rolls - that was because I was erring towards over-shooting (bracketing) a bit more than I normally would. I was playing it a bit safe as its been a while since doing the whole handheld metering, reciprocity failure maths and counting it all in my head as a timer :). That said the first shot of each framing was my estimated best exposure and those were the ones from the shots I took that came out with the best exposure too, so I'm happy that I still was pretty spot on with it all.

    One thing though is that even though I typically only shoot a frame or two for most scenes, if I want to change lenses, I have to finish a roll as there is no dark slide on the GX617. Even though I do still have a film loading darkroom bag floating around at home somewhere, it'd just be too hard trying to do a lens change with such a bulky camera and lens.

    I do need to get my shooting discipline with camera setup a bit tighter. Remembering that I shouldn't load a roll of film until I've chosen which lens I want to shoot with, and making sure I keep the camera in a particular state when a roll is still loaded. i.e. so I don't either double-expose a shot or wind on a frame that I hadn't exposed (did the latter on the weekend with one frame).

    The things I double-check before taking a shot at the moment are:

    - Film wind on position
    - Lens aperture setting
    - Lens shutter setting (usually bulb for most shots)
    - Cock the shutter

    I also make sure I have my handheld meter set to the correct ISO setting - because even though I am shooting Velvia 50 exclusively, the 90mm lens loses 1 stop with the center ND filter, whereas the 180mm and 300mm obviously do not, so I set the ISO to 20 for the 90mm and 40 for the 180mm and 300mm.
     

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