Learning to draw?

Discussion in 'Graphic Design & Digital Art' started by peteed1985, May 27, 2017.

  1. peteed1985

    peteed1985 Member

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    Anyone ever tried learning to draw only to find out that you end up with girls with one leg as thin as a toothpick and the other jumbo sized? I can kinda get things in the right places sometimes in sketches but when it comes to line art or smooth lines i'm lost because it takes more than one try to get the line in the right place. Been stopping me learning to draw for years.

    Because of this I haven't gotten to the point of Digital Art that i'd like to one day do because apparently you have to learn non digital first because they only teach you how to adapt your already good traditional art skills into digital in all the guides/tutorials I can find. None teach a total beginner to art how to do digital art.
     
  2. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    Here's the thing. It shouldn't stop you. You need to practise it over and over and you get better at it. It should go "I can't do this, I'll try again" and not "I can't do this, I'll stop".

    I went to lessons. If I'd tried all by myself, I probably would have given up in frustration too. Having a teacher to tell you how to "fix" things makes you stick with it.

    Before I went to lessons, I had a go with the (little) Nintendo Art Academy game. With that you can make graph paper appear underneath. I found it helpful to figure out where the lines of the apple should go. You can do that in your head, divide your paper up and figure out how much of your dog (or whatever) should go where.
     
  3. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    I've had the same problem. I wanted to learn how to draw, and line placement was always the issue with me.
     
  4. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    I found that "thinking about it" led to error more than just trusting to observation. Don't analyse, don't tell yourself it's this long and it's this distance away. Look at what you are drawing and judge the distance as you are seeing it. When I "think" I often get it wrong. In reality, it'll be further to the right, or shorter or whatever and if you just copy what you are seeing you do better. That's what I found, anyway. Don't think at all about how a horse "should" go, just draw the circles and the squares and whatever shapes you are seeing. Try to disconnect your head from the process and let your eyes do the "thinking". And if you can't "do" the line, forget about it and just do the shadows around it and the position of the line might become clear from that.

    Does that make any sense? You learn that in physical activities too, "don't think it, just do it".

    EDIT: oh, and there's a reason you work in pencil with an eraser. You get it wrong, you rub it out and move it.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2017
  5. deluxe

    deluxe Member

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    Paper and pencil is cheap, accurate and very fast, you have as big a working area/canvas as you like and as broccoli said- it's easy to rub out and redraw.

    Digital is fine, but definitely more expensive to start with! Ideally you need a screen you can draw on directly, instead of a tablet and pen. A Surface pro (old ones are fine, particularly Surface Pro 2 with the wacom digitiser) or a Wacom, Ipad pro, or a dedicated desktop screen etc etc

    Digital or traditional- medium doesn't matter, you still need to learn the basics.. just got to get started, and don't give up.

    For drawing people, maybe start with Andrew Loomis' books- you can find pdfs of them floating around the net
     
  6. Concept007

    Concept007 New Member

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    Even Da Vinci had his bad days.

    Like many people have said, practice is key.

    To get good at basics you need to practice. You need to train your hand to draw what your brain see.

    I'm sure when you were first learning how to write, drawing an 'a' was the hardest thing in the world. It probably took you 5 tries before you got it right.

    It's the same with drawing. Even drawing a straight line!

    Try this practice.
    1. Put two dots somewhere on your page.
    2. Place you pencil on one dot
    3. Draw a straight line towards the second dot, stopping right on the dot.
    4. Repeat, keeping a smooth and steady speed.

    If you are new to drawing, I guarantee you likely didn't create a perfectly straight line that stopped right on the dots. I know when I do this exercise, it takes me 4-5 tries before I loosen up and can do it. And I've been drawing for years!

    I originally found this exercise via Draw A Box (highly recommended). You don't get things perfect the first time. Not even the best artists do.

    And those artists that you see and think, how the did they do it?! Had been practicing for years, making thousands of mistakes. But they learnt and corrected themselves each time.

    Hope that helps
     

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