Level Twelve - Completed Dec 8th

Discussion in 'Modding Worklogs' started by slipperyskip, Nov 5, 2010.

  1. Liighthead

    Liighthead New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2010
    Messages:
    212
    Location:
    Melbourne
    :D nice work.... love your attention to detail. keep it up =D
     
  2. kombiman

    kombiman Dis-Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2006
    Messages:
    11,214
    Location:
    viva brisvegas
    Oooh you set them so the next layer, the veneer has all those connector plugs in the last piccy flush!
     
  3. Hayden4050

    Hayden4050 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2010
    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Sydney
    Looking really good so far, subbed.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    Thanks Liighthead!

    They won't be completely flush but will stick out just the right amount...hopefully. The front-mounted USB ports will be flush.

    Thank you Hayden.


    [​IMG]
    Carved out USB holes in a another piece of thin plywood and glued it on. The top edge also gets faced with thin plywood.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Applied the veneer using contact cement to one side of the support box and the four edges of the base. Trimmed up the edges with a razor knife and sandpaper. Re-cut the maintenance access hole and trimmed up its edge.

    [​IMG]
    I lost my pencil markings under the veneer so I had to temporarily rebuild the main box and set some new marks.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Drilled nine pilot holes for screws that will secure the main box floor. Four 3" and five 2 1/2". Care was given to not cross swords with the base attachment bolts.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Flipped it over and used a drill bit to countersink each hole. The back panel is made of red oak but it will get a layer of teak after driving in the nine wood screws. The screw holes will be filled with wood filler and sanded flat. Tape around the drill shank makes it easier to grip with my fingers.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    The main box floor is attached and the back panel veneer is applied. The top of the base gets its teak veneer.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Thanks for looking.
     
  5. Dark_Merlin

    Dark_Merlin Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Messages:
    134
    Location:
    2280 NSW
    Wow, this is progressing really quickly :D

    Absolutely fantastic work here. Your skills with wood and the level of craftsmanship is amazing :)
     
  6. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    Thanks mate! It is going fast because I'm in a contest that ends Dec 15th. I want to finish it before then.

    [​IMG]
    Glued down the main box walls and "clamped" them down by using the cover and a weight.

    [​IMG]
    1/4" stock is used to reinforce and align the internal corners. It also doubles the effective gluing area. Here a piece is pre-installed on a main box wall.

    [​IMG]
    Here you can see some of the internal reinforcement work. The remainder of the strengthening will come from external layering.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    I like the Mid-Century Modern floating top style. I'm trying this out except in a vertical orientation.

    [​IMG]
    Hopefully you can see the raised section in this photo. I'm dry fitting some pieces here to help determine widths and thicknesses.

    [​IMG]
    This treatment helps solve several problems for me. I feel that the main box looks too wide in previous photos. By applying a black strip to one side I invoke a slimming optical illusion. The other problem solved is the physical separation of the different finishing treatments. The teak will get teal oil and the birdseye maple will get boiled linseed oil.

    [​IMG]
    I'm also experimenting with a brass strip instead of the black strip. Brass and teak look great together and I have seen many instances of brass and birdseye maple being used together. We'll see.

    Thanks for looking.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2010
  7. Raykay

    Raykay Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2010
    Messages:
    2,699
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Voted counted, I also went to your website. You know how to work with wood dont you? :lol: My favorite has to be The Humidor CL Server. Modern components today in it would make it a killer.

    This one is looking brilliant.
     
  8. Dark_Merlin

    Dark_Merlin Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Messages:
    134
    Location:
    2280 NSW
    Vote counted :lol:
     
  9. brayway

    brayway Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2008
    Messages:
    6,713
    Location:
    Dun - New Zealand
    Looking great there!
    and voted :thumbup:
     
  10. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    Thanks! I didn't build the box that I put the CL Server into. I was just learning back in 2003 when I put that together.

    Thanks mate!

    Thanks! I'll need all I can get.


    [​IMG]
    Finishing the teak work. My favorite tool for this job is fingernail files. The garnet-based ones not the emory ones. I call them sandpaper-on-a-stick. I use a lot of blue tape to protect the edges until I can get them smooth. Snagging on cloth can be a real issue.

    [​IMG]
    Equipment setup. Got everything in except a SATA cable. Looking for a black one with a proper length. Removing the 3.5" HDD and full-size optical drive really opens up the interior space and hopefully aids cooling.

    [​IMG]
    The support box gets loaded up and tested. I plugged the rear USB port into my main computer and it recognized two USB hubs and the optical drive. I watched a Star Wars movie (Episode Two) and charged my IPod Touch from a front USB port. Turned on power to the hard drive and my computer wanted to format it.

    [​IMG]
    The hard drive power switch and optical drive are still sticking out loosely until I get my teak oil on Thursday. Those two items fit very tightly and I don't want to have to pry them back out to apply the oil.

    [​IMG]
    I will call this "Lean Testing". This is the first time the frame has felt the full weight. It feels solid and HEY LOOK...it didn't fall over. That is a good thing.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Thanks for looking!
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2010
  11. Liighthead

    Liighthead New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2010
    Messages:
    212
    Location:
    Melbourne
    sweet looking really good :D :thumbup:

    be nice to see some temps in their...

    that 5770 :)Paranoid: think it is ? ) get pretty hot? or havnt tested it? :]
     
  12. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    Thanks. It's a 5750. The cooling fans are getting air from a giant hole in the bottom of the case so I'm not expecting any problems. I haven't done any heavy duty testing yet so we'll see. Here is a photo from earlier in this log.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Raykay

    Raykay Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2010
    Messages:
    2,699
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I like that hole on the bottom of the case for the Video card, small thing but would make a difference temperatures .
     
  14. brayway

    brayway Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2008
    Messages:
    6,713
    Location:
    Dun - New Zealand
    That looks really nice!
     
  15. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    [​IMG]
    Gluing the cover on is a major milestone. The access hole is no longer so easily accessible but still possible to work with.

    [​IMG]
    Sanding down the edges and keeping the corners sharp.

    [​IMG]
    Earlier I had used 1/8" basswood to mock-up the raised panels but the final go will be done with crazy expensive laser-cut 1/8" 7-ply birch plywood. These additional plywood panels re-cross box edges adding strength while creating the decorative channel.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    I had noticed that the very tips of the points of my wood screws had emerged from the bottom vent opening. Yikes! I filed them down before lining the opening with 1/64" 3-ply plywood.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Glue drying.

    [​IMG]
    Cut a vent screen out of my chopped-up OfficeMax waste basket. I've been cutting that thing up for years. Nice powder-coated steel mesh gets the job done.

    [​IMG]
    Back frame for support.

    [​IMG]
    Front frame to secure the screen.

    Thanks for looking.
     
  16. Liighthead

    Liighthead New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2010
    Messages:
    212
    Location:
    Melbourne
    O.O

    so clean.. as always.. keep it up =D =D
     
  17. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    Thanks Liighthead.

    [​IMG]
    The bottom gets faced with 1/32" plywood. Before gluing the piece on I counted 16 individual pieces of wood that made up the bottom section. Adding this facing piece literally ties all these together. This is as far as the bottom section will go. It will not be veneered as it is completely hidden from view from any angle.

    [​IMG]
    The cover gets faced with two spliced pieces of 1/32" birch plywood. The downside of having your wife read your work log is that she busts you for using her kitchen utensils. I had to replace using her rolling pin with this medieval torture-looking device called a laminate roller.

    [​IMG]
    I'm working on my veneering strategy by arraigning pieces and marking them. The only thing left to do in this project is the birdseye maple veneering. I cannot express how difficult and technically challenging this work is. What you are about to see is approx. 12 hours of work. Birdseye maple is very, very hard and very, very brittle. It eats sandpaper for breakfast and yet will shatter like glass. I love it.

    [​IMG]
    While glue drys I play with some finish samples. This is teak oil on teak and boiled linseed oil on maple. I'm trying to get the maple to a more amber-like appearance.

    [​IMG]
    The first rule in veneering is to start with the most inaccessible, boring parts first and work your way out to the showcase stuff last. Instead of clamping these pieces I make custom blocks that wedge up against the glued-in pieces.

    [​IMG]
    They are not "single-use" blocks as I can reverse them to use on the other side.

    [​IMG]
    I keep several bags of scrap handy to use for this kind of stuff.

    [​IMG]
    Simple and effective.

    [​IMG]
    A single piece glued across the vent opening.

    [​IMG]
    The hole is carved out using my Olfa razor knife. 20 seconds after I took this photo the knife slipped and sliced out a section it shouldn't. I found the sliced piece and reattached it. This stuff is not forgiving of any error. Luckily the damage was easily (and invisibly) fixed.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    The last piece is spliced onto the back edge to connect the other two pieces. Can't see the splice marks? The trick here is to sand the piece while the glue is still tacky. The sawdust combines with the glue and helps hide the cut edges.

    [​IMG]
    Edges that will have another piece of veneer crossing over it are finished with what I call a Tupperware edge, I leave a tiny, tiny lip protruding out to help provide a better seal with the crossing piece.

    Yes that was 12 hours. The pile of exhausted fingernail files and sandpaper is impressive. And it doesn't look like I did anything because of the lack of contrast between the birch and maple.

    Thanks for looking and reading through this longish post.
     
  18. kombiman

    kombiman Dis-Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2006
    Messages:
    11,214
    Location:
    viva brisvegas
    :shock:

    Your skill with veneering is impressive! Well thought through!
     
  19. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    Thanks kombiman. I appreciate that!

    Last update. Work complete!

    [​IMG]
    Under all this clampage is a piece of birds eye maple.

    [​IMG]
    And again for the front piece. The top piece can be seen facing the camera.

    [​IMG]
    Cut up some custom-sized clamping boards from plywood. Preparing for the cover piece installation.

    [​IMG]
    The cover veneer is in two pieces. It is matched so the two pieces are a mirror image. To align the edge between them I lay down a single piece of blue tape and arrange the edge until satisified. I then turn it over and lay down multiple tape pieces filling up the entire two-piece section.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Turn it back over and remove the original aligning tape piece. The expanse of tape keeps the completed piece the same thickness throughout. A piece of tape is thin but not when compared to the veneer.

    [​IMG]
    Final clampage. I brought the whole family including the cousins.

    [​IMG]
    Teaser photo.

    Next up...final photos.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2010
  20. brayway

    brayway Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2008
    Messages:
    6,713
    Location:
    Dun - New Zealand
    Looking very nice, looking forward to final pics!
    also voted :p:thumbup:
     

Share This Page