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Linux Certification

Discussion in 'Other Operating Systems' started by Agg, May 4, 2020.

  1. Agg

    Agg Lord of the Pings

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    I realised recently I've been using Linux for about 25 years (anyone else remember the InfoMagic CD sets which had basically ALL the available distros in one 6-CD box for like $20?) and although I'm pretty handy with it there's certainly areas I could brush up on, and I don't have any bits of paper to prove I know anything at all..

    So, my thoughts have turned to Linux Certification. I see there's LPIC, CompTIA Linux+, RHCSA, etc. Anyone done any of them, or are any more credible than any others, etc? Lately I've been using Centos for home stuff and Amazon Linux 2 for cloud stuff but I've used pretty much every major server-oriented distro over the years. Is there a best distro to focus on?
     
  2. waltermitty

    waltermitty Member

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    do the RHEL cert!
     
  3. waltermitty

    waltermitty Member

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    i don't have any certs i think they're dumb but RHCP seems the most legit

     
  4. HyRax1

    HyRax1 ¡Viva la Resolutión!

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    Certainly makes the most sense.
     
  5. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    RedHat (did mine a few years ago, not sure its valid anymore), they have been highly regarded since forever because it is a combination of multi-guess and actual hands on do shit.

    Because you have to do a bunch of hands on labs there is no way to "braindump" the answers, you actually have to know the subject. The cost of doing the exam has also kept the professional certificate collectors away.

    IMO,because you have commercial experience being a Linux guy, pick a topic subject you do not have commercial experience with as RedHat have heaps of certificates now https://www.redhat.com/en/services/training-and-certification or do the AWS labs on https://linuxacademy.com/ and do the https://aws.amazon.com/certification/ work toward "Professional" certification.

    Currently working on SaltStack certification https://www.saltstack.com/products/saltstack-training/ and AWS DevOps Professional https://aws.amazon.com/certification/certified-devops-engineer-professional/ and adding Kanban to my SCRUM cert https://www.scrum.org/professional-scrum-with-kanban-certification because managing automation teams will see me out to retirement in the next 5-10 years.

    PS - companies have started using testing skills companies (have done several Linux tests in the past 3-4 years) some of these questions being asked are old and incorrect, or when applying for Debian role you have to sit a RedHat exam. :rolleyes: This usually happens when applying for international roles with US owned companies that like to this sort of certification bingo. Also once you start doing the Professional exams for AWS, expect invitations to apply for employment.

    NB - Working for AWS gives you free access to all their education, free exams. I did my Redhat exams when working for IBM, because it was free, do AWS have a similar program if so get them to pay the $1000's for the exams.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2020
  6. OP
    OP
    Agg

    Agg Lord of the Pings

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    Interesting, I hadn't really been considering the RH side of things, was more thinking of doing LPIC-1 and more basic stuff. But it's good to hear that they are a more credible certification. I still might try for a more entry-level one first to get a feel for things. There is some accomodation at work for this kind of stuff, I think it's "we pay the exam fee if you pass" but I'm not 100% sure on the policy. I was originally pursuing AWS certification and got the basic Cloud Practitioner one, but after that it became such a huge topic that I really felt by the time I was studied up for the SA - Associate exam the goalposts had moved in terms of services and stuff. So it's tricky given I don't have a huge amount of time. Hence wanting to do exams that I probably already have a lot of the knowledge for, and can just brush up on specific things. I do have ACG subscription (hence linuxacademy as I think ACG bought them) so will have a look at what courses they have available to. Thanks for the info!
     
  7. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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  8. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    RHEL is common as out there (and Amazon linux is based off of it, as is CentOS as you'd know), as is Ubuntu.

    I see less and less Suse and Debian.

    But really, changing distros is largely above knowing how to yum, dnf, apt-get, or pacman (the various package managers), the tools/apps they install are largely the same (minus version differences, e.g. RHEL is typically older versions with security fixes, while at the other extreme something like Arch is bleeding edge).
     

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