Linux Gaming

Discussion in 'Other Operating Systems' started by GumbyNoTalent, Jan 10, 2008.

  1. flu!d

    flu!d Never perfect, always genuine

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    18,757
    Sorry for the late reply gibbz,

    Online play is interesting, from what I gather it's like humans vs aliens using a number of weapons not available in the game itself. Like all Source 2 based multiplayer games I like being able to host my own server and play with mates in our own environment.

    Defiantly worth a look for the asking price in my opinion, bearing in mind you're also supporting a good thing - The ability to play PC based games without being reliant on Windows.
     
  2. neotheo

    neotheo Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Messages:
    278
    Location:
    ~
    Purchased this with the 50% offer they had a few days ago. Still cant get it to install. FWIW, they dont actually have a linux client, just a wine wrapper with all sorts of missing dependencies.

    As soon as we get into the new year I will be requesting a refund.
     
  3. Optimus.

    Optimus. Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2002
    Messages:
    6,449
  4. DerekP

    DerekP Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2012
    Messages:
    642
    Location:
    Canberra
    I got Metro and Metro Last Light on Steam sale a few weeks ago and it's kind of 'meh'.

    Mind you, i did approach it a bit wrongly. I treated it as i would Serious Sam 3 (which i highly recommend btw - after a while you realise you need to employ so many different systems and the difficulty ramps up nicely, and if you wish - to an INSANE level), or maybe Doom (which i haven't played yet). That is run and gun shoot shoot shoot.

    It's really a story, with some FPS. The Story is good, and gets better - if you take the time to listen to the environment. The FPS is, in a word, poor. There's really nothing to do but move (slowly) as much as you can and just keep firing.

    Metro Last Light the combat is much improved and mostly (so far, i haven't finished it yet) focusses on human AI opponents rather than mutant monsters.

    EDIT: I forgot to mention it is a little buggy. The first game was more the very occasional graphical glitch while the second one has twice decided it doesn't accept my mouse buttons firing. Checkpoints are frequent so it's not a real big deal.

    EDIT2: I have a few checkpoint clitches in Last Light. Basically the game crashed and lost where i was. I had to go back a whole 'chapter' to be able to play past the broken part.


    Anyway, the reason i came here was to share this:
    https://lutris.net/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6c1jHvnig0Y

    Looks pretty cool :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2017
  5. RnR

    RnR Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Messages:
    16,421
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Just in case there are any fans of Age of Empires II here - the steam HD version for windows is working flawlessly under wine. Loads of fun and still actively developed :thumbup:
     
  6. [MadHatteR]

    [MadHatteR] Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    125
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I have to recommend Mad Max if it hasn't been mentioned already, probably the most fun game that I played last year. Good open-world fun, great graphics, runs beautifully as well (Ubuntu 14.04, GTX980 w/375 drivers). Often on sale nowadays.
     
  7. DerekP

    DerekP Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2012
    Messages:
    642
    Location:
    Canberra
    I got Life is Strange - 1st episode is free. It's a story driven walking simulator (mostly). At first it was kind of dull. I'm not a teenager so i don't really relate, but the story did improve and ep1 ended on quite an interesting note. So i bought the rest (it was ~$6 or something) and i'm quite interested to see where it goes.

    For free, if you like story games, you may like it :) Interestingly, it's going to be made into a live TV series.
     
  8. gibbz

    gibbz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Messages:
    1,473
    Location:
    Adelaide, SA
    A little plug for a game me and my brother made. Based on an old arcade game we used to play as kids.

    Dog Fight
    http://store.steampowered.com/app/362370/


    What distro are most people gaming on here?
    Im using ubuntu 16.04 LTS with custom PPA for mesa driver update. Ive tried a whole heap of other distros, but spoilt by how easy Ubuntu is to use compared to everything else....
     
  9. [MadHatteR]

    [MadHatteR] Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    125
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I picked up Stellaris a few days ago, it's currently on sale on the Humble Store. Very fun 4X/RTS game, I thought it'd be too complex (made by Paradox, of Europa Universalis / Crusader Kings / Hearts of Iron fame), but they have made it very accessible for noobs like me. I have always been a big fan of Civilization, and this game reminds me somewhat of that, especially in how addictive it is.

    Definitely enjoying it much more than Master of Orion 2016, which was much too simplistic. Stellaris has the right mix of everything for me, there's going to be years worth of updates and workshop user mods as well.
     
  10. DerekP

    DerekP Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2012
    Messages:
    642
    Location:
    Canberra
    I'm using KDE Neon. The days of KDE bloat are gone. Well, this is my first ever full-time distro, so i'm only going on reputation and reviews.
     
  11. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    43,141
    Location:
    Brisbane
    KDE Neon LTS at the moment (up to date but stable KDE on an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS base).

    KDE lets me turn off the OpenGL desktop compositor, which lets me give full 3D power to my games. Doesn't make much of a difference for game devs though. I think Ubuntu LTS should always be your target for Linux gaming.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2017
  12. RnR

    RnR Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Messages:
    16,421
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Mint 18.1, kernel 4.9.5, stable mesa PPA. Hoping for an update soon to stable mesa - XCOM for linux is still broken for me.
     
  13. [MadHatteR]

    [MadHatteR] Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    125
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Ubuntu 14.04 here w/4.9 kernel, all my servers are running LTS, easier to keep it all the same. Quite used to Unity/Compiz.
     
  14. Wolfje

    Wolfje Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2007
    Messages:
    937
    Location:
    Brisbane
    I use Arch for gaming at the moment. RX 480s and the recent advancements in the open source amdgpu drivers have really made the graphics stack fantastic, and it's the first time the horrible janky experience of 3D drivers hasn't made me rage quit right back to windows for gaming.

    Can't recommend amdgpu + gallium nine enough :thumbup:
     
  15. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    43,141
    Location:
    Brisbane
    As someone who's been Linux gaming as well as doing pro 3D on Linux for well over a decade, there was no problem until now if you stuck with Nvidia.

    "Janky" (whatever the heck that means) experiences were always a result of anyone who made 3D an afterthought when buying hardware.

    Yes, what we have today is an extreme improvement in FLOSS drivers for both Intel and AMD. But previously the drivers provided by Nvidia were no more complex than their Windows cousins. Most errors people encountered were purely down to folks not reading instructions.
     
  16. Wolfje

    Wolfje Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2007
    Messages:
    937
    Location:
    Brisbane
    I don't think you speak for the anecdotes of everybody. Poor 3D experiences were always a result of anyone who made Linux an afterthought when buying hardware - to which I did. Nobody builds a "gaming" computer with Linux in mind, and they never have.

    It's all well and good if you have the cookie cutter Intel/NVIDIA combo, but not everybody does.

    Regardless of hindsight, opening up a first-class "it just works" 3D experience for more people on Linux has been a great thing.


    Until your X screen doesn't start after a kernel/Xfree ABI change, and you don't really know or have needed to know about dkms. Though it happened far more to fglrx than it did nvidia.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2017
  17. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    43,141
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Perhaps not gaming, but as above, I've been doing Pro 3D for a long time (VFX, film stuff, etc) and Linux is very much the dominant OS in that space, specifically because of its reliability under load as well as 3D performance (easily outperforming similar hardware Windows and Mac machines).

    Nvidia has offered solid Linux support for a VERY long time. Yes, the caveat still applies that you need to buy the right hardware up front, but wanting 3D out of a deskop is not an unusual thing.

    Beyond that, ATI/AMD has had functional (albeit slower than Gallium/fglx) FLOSS drivers for a *long* time now. If your only concern is a functioning GL compositor or the odd casual web game, that's worked out of the box for a very long time now.

    Ubuntu has offered DMKS and the Nvidia drivers as a one-click install for at least 4 LTS releases now, which puts that sort of "I don't know what the hell I'm doing, but it worked automatically" type experience with Linux+Nvidia back at 10.04LTS (2010, ~7 years ago). Worth noting that the same applies for ATI/AMD there too, with their proprietary drivers offering the same (see the notes above about the FLOSS drivers being adequate).

    At least since 12.04 (2012) we've had automatic popups in Ubuntu guiding people down that path with suggestions.

    If you're talking the "I use Linux but don't know what DKMS is" crowd, you're talking Ubuntu. Please don't tell me that Nvidia is difficult for newbie users under Gentoo and Arch, because newbie users don't use those distros (unless some idiot in their trusted circles has told them to, and then that person needs a kick up the bum).

    Zero disagreement from me. There's always room for improvement in every OS, no matter how good things are now. But Linux 3D has not been anywhere near as difficult as people think for the better part of a decade now. If you did Linux, WindowsNT3/4 or MacOS9 Pro3D in the late 90s and early 00s, *then* you've got something to complain about.
     
  18. Wolfje

    Wolfje Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2007
    Messages:
    937
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Eh, that's not my experience, but there you go. My first attempt was getting fglrx to load on Mandrake system with a 9800XT, and even since then I've had a bee in my bonnet about the graphical layers.

    I'm not complaining because ultimately it's all my lack of skills but in contrast I don't think that it's as silky as you think it is. My Linux circle is very limited, and I am more geared toward software engineering than sysadmin, but there you go. You may come from studio video and big gear and whatnot, but for this dotnet-developer-come-open-source-enthusiast with a genuine interest, it could have been a lot better.

    It is now, that's my point. I can now:

    • Suspend and resume my machine without 3D breaking or X's black screen of death
    • Change resolutions and plug in external monitors without severe regressions
    • Avoid tearing at all whilst using a compositor, and
    • Watch videos without massive tearing/artifacting

    which I could not do previously without significant effort.

    Most things in Linux for me have been a delightfully simple and flexible experience where the do one thing well philosophy has really helped the system as a whole. But for me, simple 3D has not been as easy as has been on win32, for both teams.
     
  19. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    43,141
    Location:
    Brisbane
    I guess my first question is, "since when?". Yes, I think all of those have been problems at some point in Linux 3D, but for both Nvidia proprietary drivers and ATI/AMD/Intel FLOSS drivers, they've all been working smoothly since at least Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (2012 - 5 years ago) for the wide variety of hardware I have to look after for people (combinations of desktop and laptop hardware). Half the items on that list were nailed 2 years earlier in 10.04LTS.

    Again, I've always run Ubuntu in businesses. I'm a Debian man by preference, but Ubuntu's "it just works" philosophy makes a lot of this go away. I guess that makes my second question "what distro were you running?". If you're doing all of this on something like Fedora, then I'm not surprised. Again, people may dislike Ubuntu for one reason or another, but it is *the* new-to-Linux distro of choice, and precisely for the reasons you're giving above. And that's precisely why I continue to recommend it in all of these forum threads. I see folks struggle constantly with basic features that Ubuntu turned into one-click installs almost a decade ago (Ubuntu's proprietary driver manager made things like 3D, WiFi and other annoying drivers that some vendors still refuse to open-source/document a complete non-issue).
     
  20. Wolfje

    Wolfje Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2007
    Messages:
    937
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Since this, I guess.


    Click to view full size!


    Eh, I've been indifferent to most things, but I do prefer rpm's mock and buildroot tools, so I tend to use and like Fedora over Ubuntu, but ultimately I don't really care. I'm on Arch at the moment to see what the fuss is all about. I find dpkg and apt irritating to package for but that's just personal preference.

    The ubuntu or bust mantra for 3D is a bit ridiculous (yes, i realise the juxtaposition between my I just want it to work complaining and choosing not Ubuntu) and is the reason for my point.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2017

Share This Page

Advertisement: