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Discussion in 'Overclocking & Hardware' started by shane41, Jan 28, 2014.

  1. OP
    OP
    shane41

    shane41 Member

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    Unfortunately DonutKing I'm not ready to pull the Osborne down yet.
    Some more photos are coming though.

    As I said early on, I will try tackle the easier projects at the start.
    By that time I should gain some experience to tackle the older machine.

    Have a massive tidy of Man cave to do + Workshop area.
    Preparing space for the projects & clearing some horizontal bench space. :thumbup:

    Want to start looking into Time capsule on Monday.

    Thankyou for the answers. :) So Osborne has Heatsink.
    That could mean 5v board ( + upgrade cpu that was optioned then ?? )
    You say Intels were the desired ones then, compared to others.

    Watch out re: Psu noted. Thanks

    Being like a 20year old machine, that means was around when Win95 OS was kicking. That a sucky OS ?? OR a possibility for these machines?

    What are expansion cards that have some quality in these machines?
    Can try get a better pic of them.

    I can't see any battery or Dallas clock chip. This I must find first??

    Speaker has continuous squeal. :wired:
     
  2. DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

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    Doesn't look like an upgrade CPU, it looks like a standard 486DX or 486DX2 with a heatsink glued on.

    You could put Win95 on it, but I'd personally just stick with DOS. This machine was probably sold when Win95 just came on the market. Win95 can be unstable and probably wouldn't be very fast on a 486 - you'd want at least 16MB of RAM otherwise it will be very slow. It really does run a lot better on a Pentium. Make sure you get all the Win95 service packs too.

    The osbourne seems to have soiund and video onboard, the cards in the system seem to be a 10Mbps ethernet network card and an IO controller - this has things like serial and parallel ports, and IDE/floppy controllers.
    The only other thing I could really reccomend for it is a general MIDI card if you want to use it for DOS games - these can be quite expensive, and you'd want to have it all set up and working before you even start thinking about that.

    I wouldn't worry about the battery for now, but on your other 486 you'd want to check that it hasn't got a barrel battery that has leaked and corroded the board.

    Single long beep is usually RAM problem.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    shane41

    shane41 Member

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    Thanks m8, I'll reply to your answers tonight. :thumbup:

    Think back 6-7 years ago with AVG 7.5 !!!

    This pc Time Capsule sporting Win98
    has an AVG free edition buried in the system.

    It had a pair of AVG securities, I killed one off + some other
    start up scanning bullshit. Slowing it to the desktop.

    Been safe mode ( Avg wont remove - says 5% of backup bla bla )

    No ram it does long series of beeps. Hates double sided pc133.
    So far 3x 256mb are working. Yay

    Doing defrag now. Gonna leave the OEM Win98 on the hdd. To check it later.
    Don't have a iso to reinstall even if I wanted to atm.

    What program to put on Win98 ( That will get rid of the left over
    fragments of AVG etc ????? )
     
  4. DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

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    Honestly, best off to flatten and reinstall rather than try to salvage it. Win9x is notoriously unstable.

    Win98 will have problems with more than 512MB of RAM, best to stay below that limit. There is an unofficial service pack that you should install too, among other things it will add USB drive support.

    http://exuberant.ms11.net/98sesp.html
     
  5. OP
    OP
    shane41

    shane41 Member

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    OK thanks for that. :)

    I'll put that Hdd aside & jam XP on another.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    shane41

    shane41 Member

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    Is there a chance is will run a light Linux?
    A general MIDI card? Something like a sound card + more output/ features??
    I can see if I in the other boxes. Not sure what to look for.

    Did have a massive cleanup today, friggen hot too.
    Found more old boxes. Yay, Elvis will be pleased. :p

    I have a hard time throwing useful things out adding to landfill.
    Have a really nice small monitor here. Thought good for testing but
    will display for 2 seconds / then wont display the image.
    Still running however & backlit + power switch eliminated.
    Added to the hard basket for now.

    Here's a link pdf Time Capsule's mb
    http://www.motherboards.org/files/manuals/1/cua-101.pdf
     
  7. OP
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    shane41

    shane41 Member

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    Gonna kick Project 7 Time Capsule off here

    There not to much interesting about the generic beige case it came in.
    Still curious the video slot though. :confused:

    Need to get onto the noisy fans.

    Here's a schematic of the board.


    Click to view full size!


    I'll be editing my posts on page5 a while + adding pics etc.


    Pulling down the system soon & well get a good look at the board then.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2014
  8. DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

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    It's certainly doable. You'd have to use a very old distro; I think most modern Linux distros target i686 (pentium pro/2) at a minimum. It wouldn't really be worth the effort unless you just want to say you've done it.

    General MIDI was a sound standard for synthesized music, a number of popular DOS and early Windows games took advantage of it. Check out mau1wurf1977's videos for more info.


    At a guess, it was probably a proprietary card that added DVI and S/Video ports.
    The board looks pretty interesting, its got an nVidia TNT2 built into it, which is decent for early windows games. You could always put a PCI Voodoo card in as well for Glide games if you wanted to. It won't support the later Tualatin P3/Celeron CPU's (there are mods for this but they are pretty complex) but you could run a 1.1GHz Coppermine CPU if you manage to track one down.
     
  9. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Linux is getting pretty challenging to run on anything pre 686 (Pentium Pro) hardware era.

    If you're on 586 (Pentium) or below, you'll need to be chasing down an older Linux that's era-appropriate, or looking to DOS/Win95.
     
  10. OP
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    shane41

    shane41 Member

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    Thanks re the reply.

    Yes I thought very interesting as well.:thumbup: Was the video port that caught my eye first.
    http://www.videocardbenchmark.net/low_end_gpus.html

    Kind of the start, before theAgp??

    If I guessed this board would be year 2000? I'm thinking it has
    a 766 cpu in it. But going by what the bios says 66mhz, maybe celeron.

    Doing more tonight though is out, back is unhappy. Dammit!
     
  11. OP
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    shane41

    shane41 Member

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    Hey Elvis, found some mAtx IBM Netvista boxes.
    Though think the heavy bastards put my back out.:mad:

    Hazard a guess what they could be?? Same style as No9 Lenovo Box.
    Flat style, monitor on top.

    Very basic on the rear like a built in video/ generic system.
    Old + slow start up to post ??
     
  12. DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

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    I'd say the TnT2 in the chipset is using an AGP interface. The board just doesn't have an AGP slot so you can change the card. I presume the TV_LCD slot would just be a proprietary adapter to add DVI or S/Video outputs. Since most people at the time wouldn't have used these outputs, Asus cut costs by not including them on the board - then double dipped by charging for a proprietary adapter for the people who did need them.

    Before AGP, video cards used whatever standard every other expansion card did. PCI, Vesa local bus, ISA, etc... AGP was specifically designed for video cards because it had a number of features to improve video performace, like sharing system memory with the video card etc...
     
  13. OP
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    shane41

    shane41 Member

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    What you think these cards are?? Snapped these the other day
    in Too Far Gone Get onto better shot later.

    http://ocau.com/pix/m304r
    http://ocau.com/pix/s44zq

    Reminds me the ddr2/dd3 mixed mode boards, all that ram. :shock:
    Not sure if normal or not in 486 machine??

    What they take?? Like pc33, pc66 stuff.
     
  14. OP
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    shane41

    shane41 Member

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    Sorry to go off track again guys.
    All this talk of old sound cards & midi stuff. Thought I had a box
    with ports on the back like that??

    What the hell is a ibm blue lightning dx2

    That some type 486 1994 era???
    Gets up to post like a rocket, but have no keyboard & mouse to drive it.

    Spot a sound card, Trident video card, some type combination ide controller.
    Cards are like Isa + Vga combined.

    1x rammy though. Barrel battery intact.

    Thought's on this one guys????
     
  15. SLATYE

    SLATYE SLATYE, not SLAYTE

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    Is this what's in that socket, or in a different system?

    If it's a chip soldered to the mainboard:
    The Blue Lightning what happens when Intel won't let IBM have a license for the 486.

    Instead they took a 386DX (which they did have a license for), fitted it into a 486 socket, and tweaked the life out of it. Slower than a 486DX for floating-point stuff (because it doesn't have a FPU) but faster in integer stuff (because IBM was good at tweaking).

    There's more info here.

    If it's a chip in a socket:
    As far as I can tell, this means that it's actually a Cyrix Cx486 core manufactured by IBM. A bit slower than the IBM-designed part but still a perfectly good CPU for non-FPU tasks.
     
  16. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    The cards are for audio, video, and i/o. The sound card is a variant of the Creative Vibra16. You can tell more about the others by reading the identifiers on the chips and any board silkscreening.

    Your ram will be in the form of 30 or 72 pin SIMMs. Do you have measurements on the modules?
     
  17. OP
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    shane41

    shane41 Member

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    Thanks reply SLATYE :thumbup:
    All the talk of the highly praised sound/ midi cards had me thinking about another box. This one NOT part of the original 10x projects I planned.

    Socket has lever like 486, cpu looks inserted. Cannot find the make of the board so far. But...........is like mAtx in size

    Not a power supply standard 20/24 pin cable I recognize.
    Has 7x Isa slots on the board.??


    Click to view full size!


    Has a mod right of the Bios chip :confused:

    Click to view full size!


    Had no experience with these old beasts guy, will need your guidance on this stuff.:)

    gdjacobs Thanks reply m8. :thumbup: Will try & take some better 1MB macro pic's.

    The cards IIRC look slighty longer than the ISA slot & maybe 3 inch wide??

    Not sure the rams, maybe can get a ruler in there & have a measure. ??
     
  18. the3coopers

    the3coopers Member

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    That is a 486-class CPU. Zero Insertion Force socket.

    That is an absolutely stock-standard AT Power supply connector.

    VERY IMPORTANT... there are 2 plugs. Both are identical and neither is "keyed".

    You MUST make sure that the black wires go in the centre

    LOOK >> http://media.bestofmicro.com/,8-3-312627-3.jpg

    If you get that wrong, you instantly blow your motherboard. Write a note about this and sticky-tape it to the cable from the PSU. DO IT NOW. You will almost certainly forget, and you will kill the board if you connect wrongly.


    It's nothing particularly special. Whilst there are oddities and exceptions, even in that era everything was reasonably standardised.

    This would be a great place to read about the various machines... simple, clear and enough to get you started...
    http://philipstorr.id.au/pcbook/showtell/showtell.htm

    It's not macro that is required. It is seeing the whole board, rather than with all the cables and cards in the way.

    All that is actually needed is the PART NUMBER. Google is where the technical details come from.

    You probably have the wrong understanding of what "ISA" is.

    Read >> http://philipstorr.id.au/pcbook/showtell/show4.htm

    Look at the MoBo pic at the bottom. It has 2 x PCI (white), 3 x VLB (super-long) and 2 x 16-bit ISA slots (the ones in 2 sections)

    Note that the ISA slots are in 2 sections. The first larger section is "ISA 8-bit" which is the XT section, and the added-on section is the additional lines to make it 16-bit, which are termed the "AT section" of the slot. XT was 8-bit, then AT was 16-bit.

    LOOK at various PC Busses > > http://philipstorr.id.au/pcbook/showtell/show6.htm

    You have the things in your hand, so just look at them. Count the pins, as they will be either 30 pins or 72 pins each side. I already sent you a photo on how to identify... it's not difficult.

    LOOK at top right >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SIMM
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2014
  19. the3coopers

    the3coopers Member

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    That is probably something that people don't realise.

    In the olden days, there was nothing "onboard". The Motherboard was the motherboard.

    The Video, Floppy and Hard Drives, Parallel and Serial Ports, sound, and everything else was handled by add-on cards.

    This allowed you to configure the machine how you wanted. It also meant that you were not given things you didn't need.

    These old machines were hellishly expensive. I remember signing the Purchase Order for a genuine IBM 486 DX33 when they were new, and I am sure it was like$4,500 (my salary was about $150 per week at the time)

    Plus these things had shared interrupts or something. You had to allocate th ebus resources so that no 2 devices shared, or they would not work. The more devices you had, the harder this became. So lean and mean was always preferable.

    Over the years the MoBo suppliers started adding things onboard. Serial and Parallel ports, etc. Then sound, then video (although they were usually absolutely basic). Only with Socket 1155 did onboard video actually start to be of reasonable performance.
     
  20. the3coopers

    the3coopers Member

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