Low maintenance outdoor plants

Discussion in 'Other Toys/Hobbies' started by wahoo84, Jan 2, 2020.

  1. wahoo84

    wahoo84 Member

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    Hello!

    not sure if this is the right forum section but please relocate if required

    I don’t know much about plans except that they need sunlight and water. Can anyone please recommend some good low maintenance and durable outdoor plants that can resist little water.

    thinking of updating the garden bed as everything is practically dead.

    Thanks!
     
  2. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    The need decent soil to grow in. Do you know what type of soil you have? If not, find out, dig into it and have a look. If you've got a clay soil (I think you get clay soils in Sydney), you need to get it more like dirt. Plant roots can't spread into hard clay.

    First suggestion: consider planting on top of the ground, by using the Esther Deans no-dig gardening method. If you keep adding straw and organic matter (ie animal poo), whatever's underneath will eventually get broken down by worms into productive soil.

    Second suggestion: roses. They are low maintenance and durable BUT when you first plant them you need to look after them until they establish their root system. Nothing is low maintenance and durable from the get-go, you have to get them established and then you can relax. As for other suggestions, you need something that likes the conditions over there. Walk around the neighbourhood and check out what's thriving in other people's gardens. Then plant those.
     
    AgB deano likes this.
  3. VippiN

    VippiN Member

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    Depends what type of plants you want. Agapanthus and Yucca plants do not need a lot of water and love full sun.
     
  4. DangerMaus

    DangerMaus Member

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    I think there is a gardening thread in lifestyle?

    Anyway I find salvias pretty hardy and there is a huge variety. They do need water but maybe once a fortnight or even once a month depending on your location and soil. Creeping boobialla and pigface are good ground covers for dry conditions,fire retardant as well.

    Rosemary and lavender will pretty much grow in rock once they get their roots down.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2020
  5. Tinian

    Tinian Member

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    How much sun will they be exposed to? What temperature range will they have to endure?
     
  6. guy.incogneto

    guy.incogneto Member

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    Most Australian natives look after themselves and look great. Lots to choose from
     
  7. rthy

    rthy Member

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    yucca's, they just wont die :(

    Had some punks who use to climb my fence, I put some yucca's behind the fence and they never came back

    Yucca
    +7 damage
    +10 resilience
    +10 armor
    +20 stamina
    Passive: chance to increase happiness by 10% for 10 seconds
     
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  8. mad_mic3

    mad_mic3 Member

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    box hedges (both small & larger growing 1's)
    roses
    palms
    natives
     
  9. power

    power Member

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    first thought here too, natives. job done.
     
  10. chook

    chook Member

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    In before nerfed next patch :(.
     
  11. AgB deano

    AgB deano Member

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    Not all natives are great, I suggest you look into a solid book on drought resistant outdoor species.

    I cannot stand the shedding yucca varieties.

    I personally love and suggest spanish bayonet yuccas though- they look great, are easy to grow as they are forgiving with soil, watering and fertilisation, practically no maintainance as they don't shed leaves everywhere and once you clip the eyeball skewers, I find it's a nice background ornamental. It's always green, gives me privacy and only occasionally attempts to maim people. My cats particularly like it, as it's good ground shade.

    They do grow fairly large though. One plant is covered in leaves on multiple trunks upto 6ft, the other has a trunk upto about 8ft, the other two at 6ft.

    A good advantage of many yucca species is they store water and have a shallow root base to quickly absorb water. This means you can get away with poor deep soil as long as you have a quality top soil. Set up a basic watering system, throw some occasional love at it and you'll have a long term happy plant. Here in bendigo for example is very rocky (large pieces of slate mostly) and hard clay after about 10-15cm in my yard but I built up the garden beds to 30cm of top soil that's ended up a quality loam with organic compost on the very top as a weed barrier/water retainer.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/24948533@N00/5537461595

    Mine aren't as dense, only 2 main plants. gives you an idea though. I can take a photo if you're interested, might help you identify it to a nursery.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2020
  12. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    Totally and absolutely agree on the Yuccas. They are amazing, so easy to grow, easy to propagate also, just need to trim them and keep them managed because they can get out of control. They look good too.
     

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