Mac Vs PC

Discussion in 'Graphic Design & Digital Art' started by Squidy, Nov 30, 2016.

  1. Squidy

    Squidy Member

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    hi all,

    I was just wondering what everyone's preference is for graphic design? I've got a desktop and also a MacBook Pro and looking to get rid of one for a bit of extra cash so I'm wondering which one everyone prefers? I mainly use the Adobe CC suite but looking to branch out to 3d animation later.
     
  2. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I do large scale IT for creatives as a living. Our process:

    1) First and foremost, let your application requirements guide you. If your desired list of applications only suit a particular platform, then question answered.

    2) If all your applications are cross platform, look at your budget, and what that gives you for reliability. Which vendor gives you the best support (including on site versus return to base for failed hardware)? Which vendor offers you the most in terms of how you connect to other people and/or harware? Which has the best options for connecting to high speed storage, backup/versioning systems, cloud vendors, etc?

    Those two questions are going to be as unique as you. It will change depending if you're a hobbyist, student or professional. It will change depending if you need to work solo, remote, or in a large team. It will change depending if you need to be mobile frequently with your editing tools, or whether you can deal with lightweight phone/tablet options on the road, and invest in a beefier system back at home/office.

    Once you're in a full screen creative application, the operating system is moot. For what it's worth, in the creative business I work for, over half our workstations run Linux (and the applications we use prefer Linux as a platform for a bunch of industry-specific reasons). As a desktop/OS, it's irrelevant to larger issues like rapid deployment, automation, ability to deploy many versions of applications in parallel and access them over high speed network instead of local installs, etc. From the artists' point of view, opening the app up and using it full screen makes no difference if it's on Windows, Linux or Mac once they're doing their work.

    So consider your individual needs from a workflow/business/interaction point of view first, and that will answer your question.
     
  3. Ezlock

    Ezlock Member

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    I recomend you to stay with pc;)
     
  4. Foolio

    Foolio Member

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    Most creative programs work on both platforms except for FCP but if you're with Adobe CC then you might as well stay all Adobe and use Premiere plus you get good intergration with After Effects. CGI and 3D modelling is popular programs are cross platform as well.

    PC will give you better bang for the buck and ability to run hardware RAID within the box unlike the new Mac Pro where you need to run backup via Lightning port. Apple products do have the aesthetic appeal though and makes your 'creative studio' look the part.

    I have friends who do CGI and when rendering you need as much performance possible. So PC will work out the cheapest and better to upgrade down the line.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Squidy

    Squidy Member

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    Awesome, thanks everyone :)
     
  6. kogi

    kogi Member

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    Whatever you are using you will need to make sure your monitor is color accurate.
     
  7. giles666

    giles666 Member

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    If you are heading the 3d route. I use a new MacBook Pro with Maya, ZBrush and Substance and it runs everything perfectly well for me.

    I'd also recommend looking at Affinity Designer/Photo as a replacemnet ofr Adobe apps, they run better on the Mac.
     
  8. mesaoz

    mesaoz Member

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    Desktop PC should give a fair bit more flexibility than a laptop (whether or not it has apple tax). Ultimately depends on the workload and how long you're prepared to wait for renders.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017
  9. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    We have non-stop crashes with Macs running Maya and ZBrush on large scenes. We've engaged both vendors, and they've confirmed the issues, but have no solutions.

    Maya on Linux is much more stable for us, and we're looking at Windows for ZBrush. As it stands, if you're doing large scale work, MacOSX is not a business-viable option for large teams.

    If you're just doing solo work, or learning, it's probably fine.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017
  10. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Let your talent be on display not some technical requirement as program/computer is just a tool.
     
  11. power

    power Member

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    Whatever you use get well versed with backup and recovery just as much as the applications. Whatever you get don't skimp but don't go balls out. Grab something solid and reliable with emphasis on the things that help you work most effectively.
     
  12. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I can't second this enough. This forum is littered with people who have lost data, and paid dearly for it.

    If you don't have two separate copies of your work (an no, RAID is not two separate copies), you're putting it at risk.
     
  13. giles666

    giles666 Member

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    I haven't had any issues, but then I am making individual assets for Unity/Unreal, so large scenes aren't really something I've encountered. Highest I've gone is about 25 million polys in Zbrush.
     
  14. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Game dev is always a few orders of magnitude lower than film or TV requirements. By definition you're creating things optimised for realitime engines.

    We have scenes that can take upwards of 16 hours per frame to render (and simple maths - at 24 frames per second for film, that's 16 CPU-days to render 1 second of footage). Although most average around the 3-4 hour mark. Not just high polycounts there, but enormous particle volumes (water/cloud/smoke/fire simulations), crowd simulations, and realistic lighting effects on top of all of those things. It's also very unusual for us to render anything in one pass, with several layers required to be rendered and composited later in even more software that specialises in that task.

    That is not to say that game dev is necessarily easier on the human side of things. But on the machine side of things, we break OSes and hardware a lot more, as the end goal is always one of a minimum acceptable visual quality, versus game dev which certainly combines a visual quality, but always emphasises the ability to run realtime at a given frames-per-second.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017
  15. Hater

    Hater Member

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    It all became moot in 2006 once Apple changed architectures, still one of the stupidest decisions they ever made. Canned their professional market almost overnight. Why people still think, 11 years later, that they're still better for professional scene crunching is beyond me. Even OS X has been found to run better on certain HP workstations than Apple's own Mac Pro :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017
  16. OP
    OP
    Squidy

    Squidy Member

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    Hi all,

    Thanks for all the great replies. I'm only a hobbyist at this stage but plan on getting better. Photography is my main target at this point but I'd like to get more into video later. As for backing up, I've got 2 NAS systems for backups, an external hard drive and also a cloud account just in case.
     
  17. T3X45

    T3X45 Member

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    I would say Mac for design work. Only because having worked on both systems in a professional environment, the Mac interface is so much more welcoming to the tasks you often have to do as a designer. Splitting the screen into 4 even panes, running separate desktops, previewing files within a folder. All work better on Mac
     
  18. giles666

    giles666 Member

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    For photos Lightroom + Affinity Photo is a good combo that runs really well on the MacBook. I find Photoshop runs rather poorly and gets really bad battery life at the moment.

    For video, if you're on the Mac use Final Cut, it runs far better than anything else on Mac. If you don't like Final Cut, maybe buy a PC.

    If you go PC, you can still use the Lightroom + Affinity combo (although Affinity doesn't run as well) or use Photoshop.

    I don't know anything about video on Windows.

    Also, Sketch is Mac only.
     
  19. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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  20. Admiral

    Admiral Member

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    I've been using a 2010 iMac at home for nearly seven years now (obvs.), and was working in a full time design/photography position on a Windows machine. This gave me a great ability to compare and contrast the two systems every day.

    In the end, if I were to upgrade the machine at home (and I'm going to have to fairly soon), I'd buy another Mac. The main reason for this is I really love the workflow and general feel of the OS on Mac than on Windows. The experience for me is a much smoother one.

    The PC I was using was an absolute powerhouse, and absolutely crushed my aging Mac in performance, but for a "daily driver" I prefer the Mac and would go Mac again.

    Just something to consider perhaps.
     

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