Modem straight into switch

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by miicah, Oct 19, 2018.

  1. miicah

    miicah Member

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    Currently my setup is this:

    Telstra fiber NTD -> Telstra Modem (broadcasting 5ghz WiFi) -> Switch

    Everything else I have (Ubiquity AP, HP Microserver, Desktop PC) is plugged into the switch. This gives me 2.4GHz/5GHz WiFi and internet access to every device in the house. The Telstra modem provides the routing/DHCP features that I need.

    What I'd like to do is remove the Telstra modem. My plan is to install some sort of hypervisor on the Microsever and starting using a router OS to manage the internet.

    Will I need 3 ports on the Microserver (1 for the modem, 1 for the pfsense VM and 1 for all other VMs)? Or is two going to be enough?

    The switch is managed, but I haven't investigated yet as to whether it has a password or not (bought it from an office that was moving). It's a Cisco 24 port GBE switch.
     
  2. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    Where is the advantage of using a VM over the Telstra modem?

    In terms of cost you are probably best to just purchase a MicroTik if you want a router OS to play with otherwise you would need 2 Nic ports on your microserver. One for internal traffic and the other for your connection to the NTD
     
  3. OP
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    miicah

    miicah Member

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    Slightly less power usage, one less thing to restart (or no longer need to do that).

    The Microserver has two NICs. One to go to the NTD and one to my switch?
     
  4. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    What model micro server are you looking at and what cost? If you are doing it to learn, good idea however I think it's the expensive option.

    A Microtik can be had for around $150 or if you want 4G fail over go the RB201 and follow this
     
  5. OP
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    miicah

    miicah Member

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    Oh sorry, I already own a Microserver. The Gen8
     
  6. callan

    callan Member

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    No telstra modem, no landline. Telstra don't release their VoIP info.

    Callan
     
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  7. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    I'd be curious to know what the land lines numbers on Nbn actually are now that most people have mobiles
     
  8. callan

    callan Member

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    The ability to have a telephone connection that can be rooted to an entire household, and not associated with one person only. A number that doesn't disappear when the owner leave the house.
    It's a number where multiple phones can ring in the same house, where their locations are known, and can be easily conferenced if needed.

    The landline telephone has evolved way beyond where once there was a single rotary dial phone in the hallway, with a quaint "telephone stool" and side table from Copperart with the white, and pink pages in it's own dedicated cavity.
    Telephone use and functionality has extended and changed massively - but it still had a role to play in many households.

    My wife and I regularly debate the worth of a landline, and the reliability of the NBN in our case (and we have it lucky being on HFC) frankly makes it not fit for purpose.. but for now it remains.


    Callan
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2018
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  9. Dr Evil

    Dr Evil Member

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    Sounds like you essentially want a speaker that plays a tune to alert that person their phone is ringing & if your a bit clumsy on where you had left your devices.

    Considering that generally everyone has their mobile phone on them the landline telephone is just another nostalgic moment we all had to use, especially in the Dial-up days ;)
     
  10. callan

    callan Member

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    Personally I find the "business case" if you will for a domestic landline marginal but a valid case can still be mounted. Your perfunctory dismissal displays an assumption that all people use the phone the same way you do, and that any other way of using the phone is somehow inferior. I prefer to keep the phone a little at arms length. It should be the servant after all, not the master and having lived long enough to remember when one had to "Book" overseas calls overseas days in advance, I have come to recognise the value of communication MORE but the immediacy - but the omnipresence of "always on, mobile telepresence" of the mobile phone somewhat less.

    In no way am I nostalgic for those days: $8.00 -$16.00 per minute for an echo-y international line that sometimes worked and sometimes didn't. 300BAUD acoustic couplers and ONE monopolistic Telco answerable to no-one. No means of contacting a loved one once they left the house. No, I don't miss those times at all.

    But to imply that there is nothing that can be learned from those times is perhaps a trifle shallow.

    Callan

    (And yes I know I sound like the old fart I actually aspire to be :lol: )
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2018
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  11. OP
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    miicah

    miicah Member

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    lol like I have a landline connected anyway, is it 2004?
     
  12. caspian

    caspian Member

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    if you mean the volumes - a lot more than you might think. people cling to the things.
     
  13. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    We have one still, the only reason being is the wife is home with the kids so in an emergency it's an available option. Once the kids are at school, its gone!
     
  14. Hive

    Hive Member

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    Get one of the serial USB 4G modems ZTE E3372 in Stick mode to be exact.

    HiLink is fairly restricting.. plus this way you can do all sorts of things, inbound NAT rules, IPSEC, etc. :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2018
  15. caspian

    caspian Member

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    my mother kept hers.

    FTTB connection with a micronode, batteries are good for maybe 8 hours max in a power-off scenario, she lives in a cyclone prone area so if there's a good gully washer then the local mains could be down for days. energy provider figures tell me that typical urban outages are either 4 hours or less outside force majeure event, or over a day following one. so the upshot is at least one of the dozen local cell towers stays up way beyond what the simulated "landline" will, and you can always make 112 emergency calls even if the one remaining tower isn't owned by your network carrier.

    inside she's got an RSP-supplied router modem with VoIP connected to a cordless phone, neither of which has battery backup, so they're both dead the instant the power goes out regardless of how long the node stays up. for alternative communications she's got a cell phone and an iPad, both of which will be fully charged before a storm, plus she's got a 20 amp USB battery pack, and car charger too. the car will be fully fuelled.

    she lost the old PSTN number during the connection process (RSP staff were morons) so there was nobody still trying to contact her on the old details.

    she might be 70 but she's still working and maintains her technical qualifications, she still has most of the marbles she ever had.

    and despite having all of the above explained to her, she still insisted on keeping the "landline", and pays extra for the facility. /head asplodes...
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2018
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  16. ir0nhide

    ir0nhide Member

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    My folks have a landline so the grandma can use it to call. They operate off the RSP-supplied modem with a DECT handset plugged in and everything runs via a UPS.
    Is there a reason you can't just port-forward everything from the Telstra router to your internal server thingy?
     

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