"My God, it's full of stars."

Discussion in 'The Gallery' started by ASIGN_Baz, Mar 14, 2010.

  1. ASIGN_Baz

    ASIGN_Baz "Maker of awesome stuff"

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    I spent last night and the wee hours of this morning doing a wide-field shoot on the Southern Cross between breaks in the horrible sodium-lit orange clouds of Canberra.

    This time I took the camera out of the telescope and just used the standard 70-300 kit lens on the Canon 400D. I set the F stop for 4.5 and the Focal length at 130mm.

    I piggy backed the camera on top of my telescope mount to track the stars.

    After 24 x 60 second exposures (darks subtracted) I am STUNNED at how FULL of stars the Southern Cross is! To think our Sun is just one of four hundred billion stars in our galaxy, let alone the infinite galaxies in the universe! What magnificence! There's a lot more going on in the universe than most of us know!

    The main Stars of the constellation also known as Crux, (Latin for cross) are Alpha, Bata, Delta, Gamma and Epsilon Crux. Alpha Crux is a binary star (Two stars orbiting each other around a common centre of gravity. These five stars are within ten parsecs or 32.62 light years.

    The dark cloudy looking object in the right hand corner is one edge of the Coal Sack, a dark nebula of stellar dust around 700 light years away, blocking the light of the stars behind it.

    The object at the bottom centre is the Jewel Box, 6440 light years away and containing about 100 stars.

    Higher Resolution image near the bottom of my page under widefields.

    Not bad for a kit lens and no telescope!

    Baz.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2010
  2. jonsey32

    jonsey32 Member

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    Wow, it's amazing how much you don't see when you look at the sky at night. Cool photo.
     
  3. Dropbear

    Dropbear Member

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    Our sun is just one of approx 100-200 billion stars in our galaxy ;)
     
  4. OP
    OP
    ASIGN_Baz

    ASIGN_Baz "Maker of awesome stuff"

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    That depends on how up-to-date your references are. Scientists are now suggesting the initial mathematics may need adjusting, that the weight (Mass) of our galaxy may actually be nearly twice that originally estimated.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_Way
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2010
  5. kwax

    kwax Member

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    i rekon we turn into stars when we die.
     
  6. dir

    dir Member

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    I reckon from a star's perspective, we're already dead. We are what stars turn into when they die.

    Think about it.
     
  7. kwax

    kwax Member

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    oOoooOOo i see what you did there thats deep.
     
  8. OP
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    ASIGN_Baz

    ASIGN_Baz "Maker of awesome stuff"

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    I reckon you're a star now...;)

    Right on mate!

    To expand on this, the great factories that stars are, they process light elements like hydrogen into a heavier element like helium through fusion. As the molecules fuse and become heavier they give off massive amounts of energy in the form of heat, light, radiation etc.

    As a star runs out of hydrogen, (Our sun converting 600000000 tons per second, now do you want to re-think how big it is?) it will have to start a secondary reaction after a few violent tantrums and convert helium into the next heaviest element.

    Every molecule in your body, on the screen in front of you, in the air you breathe, in the plastic of your keyboard is an element that was churned out of a star at some point.

    How this process was started and the time-frame is debatable between theory, fact, theology etc, but this much I know...It is an amazingly complex machine running perfectly and we are a conscious being as an end result! Unfathomable to us mere mortals who think we have the answers...

    my philosophy, never think you know for sure and QUESTION EVERYTHING you are told and taught. Don't be a robot stretching for popularity...
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2010
  9. lukera

    lukera Member

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    You are the sensei of stars :shock: Its awe-some how much came up in that shot. What I find really crazy is thinking of the angles involved in a photo like this, you're taking a small patch of the sky, from 1 position in the universe, and have exposed a countless number of stars. Imagine that 360 degrees all around us.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2010
  10. GDavid

    GDavid Member

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    Great picture, thankyou...

    It's only a few K's to Tidbinbilla though...
     
  11. NismoR31

    NismoR31 Member

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    thinking about the size of the known universe never fails to do my head in.
     
  12. Dropbear

    Dropbear Member

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    So you meant to say four hundred billion? not four billion? which is way too low??

    :)
     
  13. OP
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    ASIGN_Baz

    ASIGN_Baz "Maker of awesome stuff"

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    Correct. Thanks for picking up my type-o there!:thumbup:

    I stand corrected of my carelessness....:cool:

    edited and fixed.

    Cheers,

    Baz.
     
  14. Dropbear

    Dropbear Member

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    great photo regardless :)


    (cosmology is a bit of a amateur interest of mine)
     
  15. dir

    dir Member

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    Back in 1996, astronomers pointed the Hubble telescope at a fairly boring patch of sky that allowed them to look very far, very deep into the universe. What seemed initially to be a boring blank bit of nothing turned into what's today considered one of the most profound pictures ever taken.

    Considering that, generally speaking, the universe is evenly distributed and no one area is any more or less dense than any other, the photo reveals just how alone we are... NOT.

    http://imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hu/db/images/hs-1996-01-a-full_jpg.jpg

    Every single object in the photo is a galaxy. About 1,500 galaxies are visible in this deep view of the universe, taken by allowing the Hubble Space Telescope to stare at the same tiny patch of sky for 10 consecutive days in 1995. The image covers an area of sky only about width of a dime viewed from 75 feet away.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2010
  16. OP
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    ASIGN_Baz

    ASIGN_Baz "Maker of awesome stuff"

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    Yes the famous Hubble Deep Field.

    The objects with the diffraction spikes are a few stars of our own galaxy in the foreground.
     
  17. Paronga

    Paronga Member

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    you are by far one of my favourite members on OCAU. Not like "Haha" favourite, but up there mate.

    Great work. :thumbup:
     
  18. lukera

    lukera Member

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    Mind = blown :shock:
     
  19. Jarwedy

    Jarwedy Member

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    Agreed. Seen that pic before and its amazing to think back in 1995 Hubble only just caught "first light".

    Loving the photo ASIGN_Baz :).
     
  20. OP
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    ASIGN_Baz

    ASIGN_Baz "Maker of awesome stuff"

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    Thanks again all! I'm glad it is provoking some deeper thought and realisations!

    Cheers,

    Baz.
     

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