My Sour Dough Bread Journey.

Discussion in 'Geek Food' started by 1shot1kill, Jun 28, 2015.

  1. 1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    Well, I'm 45 this year and I realised that I've never even tasted sour dough bread. But I wanted to taste authentic sour dough bread and I figured that the only way to be sure that it is authentic is to make it myself.

    So I went and bought some organic, stone ground, unbleached flour and set about getting a starter going. I did a fair bit of research and for a while I was fairly confused about all the different ways of going about it. Then it dawned on me...If there are so many different ways to do it, there are very few ways to stuff it up.

    I started off with about 100 grams of flour and about 100ml of water. I mixed it into a thick batter and left it for a day. Then I discarded half and mixed in more flour and water. I kept doing this and got impatient, so I tried my first loaf.

    I took some of the starter and mixed it with some flour and a bit of water and set it to rise for about 12 hours.

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    Once it had risen, I kneaded the dough again and let it rise a second time, then I turned the dough out onto a baking tray.

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    It looked pretty impressive when it was baked.

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    But I was disappointed when I cut it open. It was very dense. And man, the taste was fairly sour. I still managed to eat it, however. I even took that first loaf to work and it disappeared in pretty short order.

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    So I went off to do some more research using a few of the groups that I'm a member of on Facebook. I found out that I really didn't knead the bread enough and that if you're kneading it by hand, it's pretty much impossible to knead it too much; your arms will fall off first. One guy, who bakes sour dough bread commercially, told me to switch to white bread flour, which I did. And that made the world of difference!

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  2. OP
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    1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    It's almost 10pm and I've just set the alarm for 5am so that I can add some flour to this sour dough starter and knead it, then set it to rise during the day while I'm at work. When I get home from work, I'll knock it down, then set it to rise again and bake a couple of loaves.

    There's about a litre of starter here. I'll use most of it for the loaves, then I'll feed what's left and that'll be it until Thursday night, when I'll start preparing to bake again on Friday afternoon for the weekend. As if life wasn't busy enough already!

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  3. dillusional

    dillusional Member

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    Thanks for sharing this mate, I love sourdough but have never gotten around to making it! Looks like a fair bit of fun, but a lot of work too. Good luck with it, looking forward to seeing what else you come up with :)
     
  4. OldnBold

    OldnBold Member

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    Looks great :thumbup:
     
  5. OP
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    1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    There really isn't all that much work to it. It takes maybe 10 minutes to get the starter started, then about 5-10 minutes every day for a week.

    To make a loaf of bread, I spent five minutes last night preparing the sponge, then 20 minutes this morning preparing and kneading the dough. I spent five minutes tonight knocking down the dough, kneading it and setting it aside to prove.

    Later on tonight I'll bake it for 45 minutes, which only takes about five minutes of actual effort.
     
  6. Daft_Munt

    Daft_Munt Member

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    The only issue I have is keeping alive (weekly feed) and I dont eat that much bread. Also have a good producer of sour dough that sells in many shops. For something different try adding less than 40% spelt flour, adds a nutty flavour but can turn into a brick if not eaten in a few days.
     
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    1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    From what I've read, you can freeze the starter or keep it in the fridge. If you're going with weekly feedings, then you have the starter more as a dough and less as a batter. :thumbup:
     
  8. Daft_Munt

    Daft_Munt Member

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    That was pretty much the case, stored in the fridge. Freezing it probably kill the yeast.
     
  9. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    I'm actually not even sure I've ever had sourdough, but heard lots about it. Going to have to finally try it one day.
     
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    1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    This morning I added some flour and water to my sour dough starter to create the sponge.

    Tonight, I took most of that sponge and added it to a mixing bowl. The remaining starter, I added some flour to to make stiff batter and then put it in the fridge until next Thursday.

    I added some flour to the sponge and folded it in until I had a goopy dough, which I turned out onto my well-floured table top.

    Then I set to kneading the bread for about a quarter of an hour, shaped it into a ball-ish shape, coated it in olive oil, put it in a bowl and covered it with cling wrap.

    It'll stay in the heated lounge room until the morning, when I'll knock it down, knead it some more and then set it to rise until I get home from work tomorrow afternoon, when I'll bake it.

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  11. OP
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    1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    Getting baked right now...

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  12. psychobunny

    psychobunny Member

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    Is it done yet? I'm hungry
     
  13. OP
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    1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    Yep, it's about done now.

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  14. OP
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    1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    Toasted, with Vegemite and grilled cheese.

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  15. Turnip Dude

    Turnip Dude Member

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    So how does the sourdough taste and texture relate to the average loaf of Helga's white or wholegrain bread you get from the supermarket? I've experimented with homemade breads before but without much luck, I'm keen to try again but am loath to spend time and effort on another failure. If you value your time at $ per hour, is it worth making or buying?
     
  16. Daft_Munt

    Daft_Munt Member

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    You wont find sourdough bread in most supermarkets! As for taste and texture they are different, it has a decent, hard crust. Try a local bakery that does a sourdough before you start making your own. As I previously said I cannot be stuffed as I dont eat enough bread in a week to make my own.
     
  17. OP
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    1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    The texture is a lot different from store bought bread. The taste really isn't all that different. The bread I'm making no longer has a 'sour' taste to it.

    It's not worth making it if you put a dollar value on your time. I saw 700g sour dough loaves at the market yesterday for $4. I probably put about 45 minutes of effort into each loaf and I'm currently getting paid about $43/hr at work.

    Is it worth having the knowledge of how to make my own bread with nothing more than flour, water and a bit of salt? Hell, yes! :thumbup:
     
  18. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    It's a lot heavier bread I assume?
     
  19. OP
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    1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    Yes, heavier as well.
     
  20. OldnBold

    OldnBold Member

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    I have it at my local Coles and the Woolworths, in Grafton. I think you have to have a bakery section though. It is found in the bakery section.
     

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