Naked servers

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by Java Head, Jun 12, 2009.

  1. Java Head

    Java Head Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2008
    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Brisbane
    http://tinyurl.com/mwrpz6 (slashdot article)

    http://tinyurl.com/mh6rpy (Data-Centre article on HP)


    Click to view full size!


    Spotted this on /.
    HP says it solves the issue of weight and shipping these machines.
    What about the rest of the servers working life? Cooling? I understand most server rooms have
    dedicated air-con, but not all! Looking at the pic I don't see
    A fan ANYWHERE on the machine (cpu fan not included).

    IMO I don't see this catching on ...discuss!
     
  2. TMM

    TMM Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Messages:
    7,487
    bizarre, i can't imagine a couple of fans and heatsinks would add much to shipping given it already has some heavy harddrives in it.
     
  3. ewok85

    ewok85 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2002
    Messages:
    8,074
    Location:
    Tokyo, Japan
    Looks good!!

    There is no need for a massive metal case than could withstand an attack by an angry drunk engineer in the early hours of Monday morning. It reminds me much of the Google approach to servers - http://news.cnet.com/8301-1001_3-10209580-92.html

    As for cooling a server doesn't really need that much - proper airflow through and around the rack means you need far less on the server itself, Cloudrack have already shown that.

    Edit: they probably have shaved anywhere from 5-15kg by shipping a server like that, and theres easily a saving of $500 for an end customer.

    Edit2: Reading into this deeper it is a VERY Google inspired line of products, with a twist. It is very similar to Blade servers of old - you have a standardised chassis of 2U which has fans on the back for cooling and handles the power. Each server is 1U and pushed into the chassis. Inputs are on the aisle side (which is almost always the cooler side) so airflow is optimal.

    HP is using this as part of their new "POD" datacenter idea, basically airconditioned shipping containers like Google has been doing for a very long time now. This gives you a very flexible, high end, cost effective way to have a massive number of servers, but not much use to us plebs at the bottom.

    Still, I'd far prefer to use these over "traditional" servers - feels very much like a position between blades and standalone servers. Would make for great VM hosts I think.

    More on POD: http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2008/12/09/the-hp-pod-90-degrees-in-the-cold-aisle/

    Image of the chassis:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2009
  4. Crusher

    Crusher Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2001
    Messages:
    3,069
    Location:
    Sydney & Adelaide
    I can understand the need for weight reduction - some of the companies I do work for need structual engineers to approve rack placement due to floor slab load bearing maximums being reached, particularly in high rise computer rooms.

    A decent server weighs 20-30kg or so. Put 15 of those in a rack and you have 400 or so kg of vertical pressure on the slab. Multiply by 10 racks and you have a slab thats got an extra 4 tonnes of load in a concentrated area. Makes for some fun.

    The trouble I see with lack of fans is heat wont be drawn out into hot rows in the data centre. Instead it will become convection heat and sit inside the rack and be transferred vertically to the chassis above
     
  5. ltd73

    ltd73 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2005
    Messages:
    1,724
    you could not use this in a conventional datacenter with hot-isle/cold-isle layout unless you augmented it with large blowers on the racks for positive air pressure.

    its really just something for the likes of container-based DCs.

    the less weight is a bit of a selling point. but not much.
     
  6. Rass

    Rass Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    2,935
    Location:
    Brizbekistan
    These kinds of servers are great. You do really need to design the datacentre around this kind of innovation though.

    My work has a floor of datacentre designed for this - it's all NAS/SAN and specialised racks, these babies just slot in and the racks take care of the cooling and power.
     
  7. dink

    dink Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2002
    Messages:
    7,480
    Location:
    Brisneyland
    Sounds a bit like a blade server with the PSU and Cooling in the rack. Only difference being that these servers have the HDD's on board, rather than in a dedicated chassis.
     
  8. ewok85

    ewok85 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2002
    Messages:
    8,074
    Location:
    Tokyo, Japan
    My only issue with these ideas is 'how long will it be supported?'

    Can I buy the next gen hardware on a board that'll fit into the same basic chassis? Or will I need to buy another chassis in 3 years time?

    I can think of it working fairly well in many of the datacenters I've been in recently (including the one I'm sitting in now), price would be very important. I'd love to have a spare ready to go incase of hardware failure...
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Java Head

    Java Head Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2008
    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Brisbane
    I was hoping to spark an argument, Cooling: Naked Vs. Enclosed
    :p
     
  10. ewok85

    ewok85 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2002
    Messages:
    8,074
    Location:
    Tokyo, Japan
    There is nothing to debate, ultimately the servers are used in an enclosure. They are just marketed/sold/delivered naked.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    Java Head

    Java Head Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2008
    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Brisbane
    .......oh :(
     
  12. dink

    dink Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2002
    Messages:
    7,480
    Location:
    Brisneyland
    All the money and weight you save on the servers needs to be spent on the rack. Net difference: fuckall.
     
  13. looktall

    looktall Working Class Doughnut

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2001
    Messages:
    24,713
    the fans would be located on the chassis.
    think of these like blades.
    they're very basic as all of the cooling and power requirements are handled by the chassis that they're installed in to.
     
  14. Whisper

    Whisper Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    8,297
    Location:
    Sydney
    I'm sure since it is HP, they will manage to make the weight up in the packaging. :lol:
     
  15. Fitzi

    Fitzi Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    519
    Location:
    Central Coast, NSW
    Amen to that! LOL
     

Share This Page

Advertisement: