NAS prebuilt vs custom media pc

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Hardware' started by rubber_pants, May 13, 2012.

  1. rubber_pants

    rubber_pants Member

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    Hi
    I currently have failing hard drives in my pc, that i use to store everything.. so I am taking the opportunity to move to a NAS style solution.

    What is your opinion on a custom built media/storage/server machine, vs a prebuilt NAS device that allows you to swap in/out hard drives?

    cost vs stability vs features vs etc.?

    I am steering towards a prebuilt NAS for around $700-$1000. this is also my first NAS buy and i have only done little research.
     
  2. Caffeine Dealer

    Caffeine Dealer Member

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    I would strongly suggest a home built NAS/Filer server.

    Intel G630 Pentium dual core
    Gigabyte/Asrock 1155 mobo
    4GB GSkills DDR3 RAM
    500w Silverstone Strider PSU
    Silverstone TJ08-E mATX case
    4 x Seagate 2TB Green hard drives
    Windows Home Server 2011
    $900.00(ish)


    This way you know exactly what is in there and that it is of decent quality.

    The above mentioned gear is almost identical to what i am using and it does a surprisingly good job of gaming when i add a 6950 2gb GPU to it for shits and giggles :thumbup:

    My 2c :Pirate:
     
  3. gaz.10

    gaz.10 Member

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    I too would go with home build over a nas mine is old socket 775 q8300 Windows home server 2011 and i stream hd to my tv play my music i get around 100MB's on cable and around 15MB's wireless transfer speeds and have acesess to my documents, photo's all over the world. You dont have to spend a lot of money i put mine together for $300 that was hdd prices i had the rest laying around even an old p4 would do. I have mine on a auto shut down and start up so it does not run 24/7 when i go away i run it 24/7 or you can set it to wake on lan but i tryed that it takes to long to start up.but it has been two years now and it has not missed a beet it doesnt even have a monitor hooked up i should hook one up and check it lol.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2012
  4. zero_velocity

    zero_velocity Member

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    Go for the lowest power consumption build you can do with as many SATA ports on board ;). Its what I am running and I prefer it over a prebuilt NAS as there is no real limitation to what I can do with it (Mine currently runs win 7 with a VM home server 2011 as a WSUS).

    Simply put, you can do a hell of a lot more than what you can do with a prebuilt system.

    Edit:
    1. In terms of cost, it will probably work out a far bit cheaper than the equivalent prebuilt alternative
    2. Limited features on a NAS, unlimited on a full fledged server
    3. Stability - use good quality parts and it will last a very long time. Prebuilt NAS's often use one or two crummy little fans to cool the entire system, and generally because of this run a bit hotter then they should, especially in summer.
    4. You will be able to expand your storage capabilities almost endlessly over a NAS
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2012
  5. MoultoMan

    MoultoMan Member

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    Another vote for home built server here. If you want hot-swappable drives there are plenty of 5.25" hotswap bays and even some nice cases with it built in.
     
  6. Gonadman2

    Gonadman2 Member

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    I have a little ReadyNAS NV+ which is quite old by current standards but performs its role perfectly. As much as having 100mb/s transfer speeds would be great, my 30mb/s read and 20mb/s write is fine. I personally wouldn't spend $1000 on a NAS, unless you really need those high transfer speeds. If its movies/pictures/music that you're storing then a NAS is fine.

    I also love that fact that I have spent zero time maintaining it, either having to do updates or restarting or anything of that sort that even the best setups still have to do from time to time. I like that I don't have to configure it, if I want more space I just whack another drive in and away it goes.

    I know this is a PC forum and people are going to hate NAS's because they aren't as versatile or configurable (as a PC/Server), but if you're after a rock solid and simple solution then I think they fit that bill perfectly.

    My ReadyNAS uses about 45W (measured) while running, I'd like to see a Server match that.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2012
  7. OP
    OP
    rubber_pants

    rubber_pants Member

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    hi all.
    after many many weeks and threads of trying to find a solution, I landed on a QNAP NAS.

    it cost $1100 for the machine, and I threw in 4x WD Black caviar drives ($800).
    I know that most people in the OCAU forum would be more keen on doing a custom build... and most the time I would agree. But I wanted to get the most power efficient and data reliable solution, that required the least maintenance.

    I question whether it was worth paying $1900. but the machine does have quite a few features straight out of the box. these features could be configured by any custom build too... but it seems like significantly less work. and the interface for the management of the services is good. highly recommend. any thoughts?

    update: the reason i chose overkill on the wd black caviars is because every single person I've seen use 'green' caviars has had horrible experiences, and they tend to die exactly a year after being purchased.. not sure why... but maybe it's just been a coincidence.
     
  8. X-ZemPt

    X-ZemPt Member

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    I've got a QNAP TS-410 for a backup device with 4x 1Tb drives in RAID 5.
    I've currently got another machine C2D machine with Windows Server 2008 installed for data/media storage running Plex media server.
    I'm wanting to downsize the C2D machine to a HP Microserver with 4x 2Tb drives for media storage.
    I've been very happy with my QNAP, I use them at work and also had a lot of experience with Synology boxes and have been good to use as well.
     
  9. stenchlord

    stenchlord Member

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    The savings in power efficiency would likely have been offset by the initial cost I'd have thought and if you want power efficiency why would you go with Caviar Black drives? You could have gone with some Caviar Blue drives and gotten similar speeds.
     
  10. Renban21

    Renban21 Member

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    I have both

    I have a home built server and a Synology NAS. The NAS is better in my opinion if you just want to plug and play. It also uses way less power even though the server sleeps more than the NAS.
     
  11. archie

    archie Member

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    I went with the hp microserver option with whs2011 when deciding between the same however i found I just don't have the time to setup whs properly.

    Now thinking of selling it off and changing over to a synology nas.

    Would love to stick to the hp solution however the time to set it up and tinker is the downfall for me... wish I was still a uni student, was easier to find time back then:p
     
  12. OP
    OP
    rubber_pants

    rubber_pants Member

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    from personal experience also, I've been deterred from blue caviar. I purchased 2x320gb blue caviars a few years back, and tried putting them into RAID0... just to check out the performance on a new build.
    every 2 weeks, the raid setup would become corrupt, and it was incredibly difficult to reformat the drives (the corruption was, in turn, causing an issue where the boot-from-cd option was ignoring keystrokes or skipping boot-from-cd altogether).
    after 4 or 5 corruptions, I was deterred from using blue caviar for reliability. but again, it could have been a bad batch, poor raid setup, bad motherboard, etc. etc.

    as for the NAS, i think the biggest factor steering towards prebuilt was the energy factor - I was scared that I'd build something that draws too much power and costs a lot to run constantly. i like that the prebuilts have everything managed for you.
     
  13. glasswindow

    glasswindow Member

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    IMO get a HP Micro server, they are about $250 ish. This way you get a branded product that you can either format with Free Nas or install Windows Home Server. From memory in the Microserver thread it has about 45w draw with 4 HD's, where as an old PC set up as a storage box will have a much larger draw.

    This way you have the best of both worlds
     
  14. Akh-Horus

    Akh-Horus Member

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    Never seen a HP micro server......please explain?
     
  15. glasswindow

    glasswindow Member

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  16. Damn_Good

    Damn_Good Member

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    I don't suppose anyone could tell me how easy it is to torrent to a pre-made NAS or WHS build?

    I currently have my workstation, gaming rig and server all as one win 7 box and therefore I'm running a big box 24/7 just because it's so easy to remote in to from the phone/laptop/htpc to start a torrent or whatever manually. I've tried rss style stuff in the past and it's just too much work and it's too unreliable.


    (Im aware of the stupidity in buying a NAS to save on power bills if the initial capital will need ten years of power saving to pay me back. Just curious.)
     
  17. GooSE

    GooSE New Member

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    Off-the-shelf NASes will have a torrent client with a web interface, so you just point your browser to it and off you go.

    With Win7 you have 2 choices. Either use a torrent client that provides a web interface (heaps do) or remote desktop into the PC and do things like you would on a normal PC.

    Just to add, I'm another happy HP MicroServer customer. I've had my N36L for over a year and it hasn't skipped a beat.
     
  18. Renban21

    Renban21 Member

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    Synology NAS has its own torrent search and download software with great control over download and upload rates, seeding etc. Leave it running needs no PC except to select your torrents accessing the NAS via web page. Very low power usage 68W when running, 6W when idle. I use it instead of the server I have for torrenting.
     
  19. renagade

    renagade Member

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    Was given an QNAP TS-219. Have it on 24x7 with 2x1TB drives torrenting the shit out of stuff. It's fun to play with and was a good couple of weeks setting up with FlexGet (RSS reader) and rutorrent.
    If I was going to get another device I might go custom depending on the size of the case. being able to run windows would be a big plus, but not essential.
     
  20. OP
    OP
    rubber_pants

    rubber_pants Member

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    qnap's torrenting system is great and easy to use. the only downside is the inability to put peer guardian /peer block etc.

    unless someone else knows how to configure this?
     

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