New apartment, no phone sockets? How to internet?

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by shiny1, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    no it is the standard for a structured cabling system.. has nothing to do with the NBN that is just an added bonus

    the whole point of cabling up with rj45's or the correct name 8Postions 8Conectors aka 8P8C's is so you have a non specific data point that can be used for phones or what ever via the right accessory cable, if you have peopel wiring them up with 8P4C it looses the whole point of being structured
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2013
  2. kronikabis

    kronikabis Member

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    This... I'd go with this... get a handset and check for dial tone if a phone line is connected
     
  3. OAG

    OAG Member

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    From the guys that run the line in, we previous had problems with some estates that don't provide info on NBN so when we order our standard telephone run-in, we get extras, it may not be a common practice for other builders, but we do it this way so just to be safe, rather than redo the job again, i've been out of engineering for a while since uni so i'm not entirely sure, can you confirm?
     
  4. martino

    martino Member

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    +1

    It could be a serviced apartment where the building owner provides LAN connection points to the apartment and provides an internet connection on demand (at a hefty price usually).

    More than likely its simply an apartment with structured cabling going back to a central point with patch panel and incoming phone line though.

    OP needs to provide more info and do some exploring.
     
  5. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    extras let alone any type of "smart wiring" is barely done in new units hopefully now the nbn is gathering steam and peopel are either retro fitting or doing it right from the start. but i was a newish block awhile ago to do a mdf jumpering all they had where daisey chained cat3 (two pair) telephone cabling it would handle the nbn poorly imo I'd put that down to poor design of the building if anything no propper comms room mdf at the main entery of the building and poorly protected.. new place and the mdf cover is already falling off

    good thread on WP about MDU's and the NBN http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum-replies.cfm?t=1772145
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2013
  6. redex

    redex Member

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    Defiantly call

    Deff Call up the Landlord,

    There is probably one phone line active somewhere in the house and a cabinet where all those cables pictured lead to, the advantage of that is you can have as many phone lines as you like by just patching them in (4-5 is really the max).

    I wish my house was set up like this,
     
  7. OP
    OP
    shiny1

    shiny1 Member

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    Thanks guys. I called up the landlord 2 days ago and it seems to be a common problem among residents. TPG has confirmed there is internet going to the apartment but something's missing between the apartment and the unit. I'll see what the landlord says.
     
  8. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    carefully remove the wall plate and see if any of the cables are of a different colour/ type then if ther eis one different colour/ type that would be the phone line
     
  9. Heist

    Heist Member

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    This is a very normal situation in an apartment?

    TPG (or any DSL based ISP) would terminate the service in the MDF, you (i.e. customer being landlord or renter) are responsible for the jumpering that goes on in the MDF to the correct point.

    The three sockets you see are likely structured cabling direct to the MDF (if it's a small apartment), or an IDF (if it's a lot larger).

    A few cablers moonlight just to do this jumpering for about $60-70 if you can confirm ADSL has been installed somewhere.

    http://www.adsldoctor.com.au/

    This is of course, assuming you have just ordered DSL for the apartment - if it was already in the place from the landlord then it's easier to look for a dialtone (if there's a phone line), or the voltage across the pins if it's naked DSL.
     
  10. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    try like $90 - 120 fyi we don't moonlight. we do or do not... i know guys who don't do CF's let alone mdf jumpering
     
  11. Heist

    Heist Member

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    Sorry that wasn't meant to be offensive in any way? I had similar company/guy come do my place, day job was a full time cabler in the industry, at night he did this (that's when most people in apartments need them to come out), making use of his access keys (to multiple MDF types) and license to do so.

    Sounded like a great idea to me.

    I just noticed the price too, when I had it done last year (must have been a different company) it was $70.
     
  12. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    none taken but just saying
     
  13. callan

    callan Member

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    Only one's I could find at short notice. Sorry, not terribly informative.
    The black thing on the right is the crappy Telstra cable router.
    [​IMG]


    And during the wiring phase:
    [​IMG]

    Sneak peek of the reno:
    Kitchen before:
    [​IMG]

    Kitchen After:
    [​IMG]


    Callan
     
  14. AgB deano

    AgB deano Member

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    Unplug all of your LAN devices, get a RJ45>RJ12 cable and a multimeter, plug the RJ45>RJ12 cable into each port and test the voltage on the two pins. You'll soon work out which one (if any) of the ports is your phone line as you'll see ~48V DC. Do ensure that you DO NOT short these pins and keep your fingers off the metal probes. If you don't have a multimeter and don't mind stuffing around a bit, unplug all LAN devices then plug your ADSL modem into each socket and check the line stats. Cycle the router each time and you'll eventually find the correct socket if it is there.

    As mentioned though, if it has not been connected then you'll need to pay someone to connect the copper pair that TPG have used in the buildings MDF/IDF to your apartment.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2013
  15. Quick Reply

    Quick Reply Member

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    Firstly, go with Cable if it is possible, much better than ADSL. I noticed some F-type sockets usually used for HFC. Can you tell if this is connected to Foxtel Satellite or Cable? If it is Cable, then you can use Cable Internet. Congrats.

    If you don't already have Cable, have a look to see if you can get Optus Cable installed if possible. Optus have plans which include installation, which is not bad value considering that with Telstra there are a lot of fees just to get everything connected.

    I'm not sure where you are located, TransACT might be another option. I assume you are not in an Velocity/Opticomm estate or have NBN.

    Second, if cable is out of the question do this.
    Look around the home, through all the cupboards, etc. and see if you can find any connections that might be relevant. If you have multiple sockets, there must be a patch panel somewhere (unless that is the patch panel, then you should have some sockets elsewhere in the home leading back to there)

    Whichever sockets you find, the safest way to test if it is Phone or Internet is to get an ordinary telephone handset (which is NOT externally powered) and plug it in to see if you get a dial tone. Phone lines run at 50V, Network cables run at 5V.

    It doesn't make sense to run around with an ADSL modem, because the ADSL modem won't be configured for the connection, making it a useless test.

    If you plugged a phone line into the LAN port of a router it will blow up the router, but if you plugged a unpowered telephone handset into a LAN port, it will simply not work, and won't cause any damage.

    Test all the ports you can find and see if you get a dial tone. Even Naked and unprovisioned phone lines have tones on the line. It is perfectly safe to plug an RJ11 into an RJ45 jack.

    If you truly don't have a phone line anywhere (no dial tones) in the home and you have found the other 3 ends to rule them out as being for phone, have a walk around the shared areas of the property and see if you can locate the MDF somewhere. The MDF will have a lot of wires. If cable is not an option, you will need a licensed private cabler to install a telephone line from the MDF to your home.
     
  16. KonMan

    KonMan Member

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    shiny1 - Consider doing a door knock to a few apartments and ask if they are connected to the Internet... Im sure that they would be in the same boat as your sis.

    K.
     
  17. mshagg

    mshagg Politburo

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    I had a brand new apartment wired up about 2 years ago.

    From the MDF in the basement (well, not an MDF in my case but for the purposes of this discussion that'll do lol), it needed patching to my apartment. Once it was patched to my apartment, they asked me which socket I wanted it wired to. There's a little patching board in the bedroom's built in robe, where they patched it through to the nominated socket.

    I was lucky as the ISP has an exclusive deal with the building and takes care of everything from sales to cabling as part of the install. In your case I'd just get my wallet out and call a cabler. Sort stuff out with building manager so they can get access to the areas they need to.
     
  18. AgB deano

    AgB deano Member

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    Nice kitchen. I see catfood and the bowl but no obligatory cat photo?!

    Unpowered handset is definitely a better idea but all routers will attempt to sync on an active pair. You're not going to see net until it's configured but with decent routers ADSL modems you will see line stats as soon as the connection is negotiated (<30 secs) in either the logs or connection stats page of the router (depending on model).
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2013
  19. EEPROMS

    EEPROMS Member

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    First of most analogue business lines are not RJ12 any more but RJ45. In fact the cables supplied with the telephones our company sells are dual mode ie will fit RJ12 and RJ45. I suspect the phone line enters the house via the cupboard with the router/modem in it. Unplug the router and just plug a stock telephone with a RJ45 plug on one end into everything until you get audio.
     
  20. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    Last edited: Jan 19, 2013

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