New invention to generate household electricity

Discussion in 'Science' started by sml_nail, Jul 4, 2007.

  1. sml_nail

    sml_nail Member

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    Looks interesting and even better it might be available locally :)
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2007/06/27/1963676.htm

     
  2. scon

    scon Member

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    That's pretty cool... wonder how much electricity exactly that it generates. Pretty good for people wanting to live off the grid.

    Hm... isn't Perth something like the second windiest city in the world?
     
  3. WestCoast

    WestCoast Member

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    Dunno, but we must be close. It's always freakin' windy!

    I think the biggest factor in favour of harnessing wind power here in Perth is the strength and consistency of the sea breeze we get. The "Fremantle Doctor" is as reliable as clockwork and quite strong too, so using wind (as well as solar) would be a good option for us sandgropers.
     
  4. CD

    CD Member

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    turbines like these should make them much easier to deploy in residential areas where a vertical turbine is likely to attract complaints from neighbours. put some solar panels beside this and it'll look like a hot solar waster system! if the government can get its act together and come up with an attractive rebate scheme, this (combined with solar & hydro) will go a long way in reducing our emissions.

    good on him :thumbup:
     
  5. Arch-Angel

    Arch-Angel Member

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    Government is already offering pretty massive rebates at the moment for solar panels.
    For around $10,000 you can get a panel large enough to cover the standard home's power usage AND pump some back into the grid.

    They come with a 25 year warranty, and I guess the best thing is that they are silent and mostly out of site.
    I would personally be worried that a wind turbine would get squeeky over a few years and drive me mad.

    I guess my opinion is "Why bother?" when solar power is such an untapped option?
     
  6. noboundaries-au

    noboundaries-au Member

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    I dare say you would be able to oil them
     
  7. kombiman

    kombiman Dis-Member

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    Source for that? Would pay for itself in power bills long before 25 yrs.

    Besides in 25 yrs my watch will generate power, gps, phone, pc and be my public transport


     
  8. thebranded

    thebranded Member

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    wont this only generate power if the wind comes from one direction?
     
  9. noboundaries-au

    noboundaries-au Member

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    Nope.

    If one of the blade-majigs at the top faces > then ones at the bottom will face <. Thus allowing it to harvest wind energy from either direction

    Code:
    [COLOR="Blue"]Wind>[/COLOR] >
    
    |\    o    \|
    
          < [COLOR="Blue"]<Wind[/COLOR]
    
    
    Blue shows either direction pushing against turbine
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2007
  10. scon

    scon Member

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    For somewhere like perth where they allways get the wind come in from the ocean it wouldn't matter so much.
     
  11. taztassio

    taztassio Member

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    we are talking average house here, i cant see dinos, evas etc being run by a wind generator (q6800's fuking shit up!)
     
  12. CD

    CD Member

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  13. andrew_bg

    andrew_bg Member

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    *when it is windy.

    no wind = no power

    that is why these technologies are not suitable for baseline load

    Good on the guy it is a good interpretation of existing technology, ie it is far from an invention, but all the video that i have seen of this is a free running, not generating product.

    You dont go showing mockups that dont make power if there is no good reason for that.
    I think that you will find that his calculations or mechanical aspirations are less than desirable.
     
  14. noboundaries-au

    noboundaries-au Member

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    Perth has a fairly consistent wind. Pretty much a continuance of the roaring forties which blew various Euro ships onto the west coast pre-Cook.

    I dare say itd be coupled with solar. But even without, you charge a supply with the electricity you arent using. This supply powers you when it isnt windy, or with solar, at night.


    Why would he show the power side, for one its a big bulk, thats not new. And two hes showing his design. Given the way i think the turbine will generate power, (spin magnets inside coils), the axle of his design wont touch the power equipment therefore having negligable effect on power generation capacity
     
  15. andrew_bg

    andrew_bg Member

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    DOnt get me wrong, good on the guy for pushing the idea and the concept is good, but the general misinterpretation from all the articles the the press that he has released is saying that JUST 5 of these on your roof will power your house.

    That in itself is incorrect.

    You need battery storage as the system cant be run live off the generators and the house is powered by the batteries all the time.

    All I am saying is that the way that these types of things are promoted to the public is in fantasy land. He might have well have been flogging hydrogen generators for cars as they are about as close to reality as the general picture that he is pushing.:D
     
  16. shift

    shift Member

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    I wouldn't take any prevailing weather condition for granted the way we're screwing things up.

    It'd be grid tied in most applications.
     
  17. Smegger

    Smegger Member

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    Fantasy land?
    There is a perfectly good storage bank attached to almost every home in the country - it's called the electricity grid. You upload that which is not used and are credited for it on a 1:1 basis.
    What's wrong with taking advantage of an infrastructure that is already there?
     
  18. andrew_bg

    andrew_bg Member

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    Because in that scenario you have a situation where if enough people take up the product and install it that the infrastructure that you are using as your buffer and backup power has no-one paying for it.

    Windy days everyone feeds back into the grid and no-one generated load ont he grid. So where does the power go?

    Feeding power into the grid only works whilst there are enough consumers for this power.

    What happens when you get to the point where more people feed than the grid than are extracting power from it?
    Power stations ramp down product that is what.

    Then you get a period of low to no wind and there isnt enough power to go around.

    I agree with little grass roots initiatives like this, i really do, but no one should think that they are a solution for the population.

    Once you get more people feeding the grid than taking from it you have >50% or so of the population that is going to have change their infrastructure as they no longer have an adequate buffer.

    Any proposal that uses the grid as a storage mechanism will only work in very small numbers
     
  19. shift

    shift Member

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    Turn off hydro plants.
    Back off production on the peaking power plants.
    Activate the off-peak supply.
    Pump water uphill.
    Power up your desalination plants.
    Electrolize water to produce hydrogen for cars.
    Smelt some more aluminium.

    Most of these things can be switched on an off, within seconds, minutes or hours, to track supply/demand.
    It's damn near impossible for all of Australia's populated regions to be completely wind-free at the same time. There will always be a certain percentage of these things going.
    Plus you combine it with the output of solar and other renewables and you reduce the amount of reserve capacity you need a lot.

    You still do need reserve capacity, but that's nothing new. We already need reserve capacity to cover failures and maintenance downtime.
    They won't be able to produce these things fast enough to cause a significant impact in the near future.
     
  20. CD

    CD Member

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    here's where hydro and gas fired stations are useful as they can ramp production relatively quickly and easily (much quicker than coal).

    that said, if wind power is going to generation > 20% of our electricity (long way away i think), then we probably need local storage. PV panels in this regard is pretty good in that you know it will generate power within a certain range during the day (peak usage as well!), with zero output at night (the grid will at least know when to ramp up).

    for those interested in wind power, there's another discussion going on here:
    http://forums.overclockers.com.au/showthread.php?t=589312
     

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