New Rad fans

Discussion in 'Extreme and Water Cooling' started by thedirkdiggler, Feb 5, 2019.

  1. thedirkdiggler

    thedirkdiggler Member

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    Upgrading parts of pc.

    I have 2 rads

    120x2 rad
    140x2 rad

    At the moment I think I have these style of fans.

    https://www.pccasegear.com/products/20514/corsair-air-series-af120-quiet-edition-case-fan-twin-pack
    which is 40cfm @ 21dB
    1 is dead, the other is on its way.

    So I was looking at
    https://www.pccasegear.com/products/37647/be-quiet-silent-wings-3-120mm-fan
    which is 50cfm @ 17dB
    or
    https://www.pccasegear.com/products/37646/be-quiet-silent-wings-3-120mm-fan-high-speed-edition
    which is 73fcm @ 28dB

    I was looking at up using them at max speed all the time. My pc is on 24/7

    is 28dB loud, I think it would be the best, but I sort of like a lower noise computer.

    any other options?

    I haven't used a PWM fan at all yet.
     
  2. tunksy

    tunksy Member

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    What rads do you you have (brand/model)? Are they low fpi or high fpi? (Fins per inch)

    If they're lower fpi youll get away with slower quieter fans

    If its high fpi you need faster /high static pressure fans which will be louder.
     
  3. Ratzz

    Ratzz Member

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    Looking at the 3 fans you've linked:

    Your existing Corsair fans have a static pressure of .5mm H2O. These are case fans and not really suited to radiators unless they are very low fins per inch, ie. a very open radiator with lots of space between the fins and very little air resistance. They are designed to move a lot of air with relative silence provided there is little resistance (pressure).

    The low speed BeQuiet's have a static pressure of 1.7mm H2O, which means they are more capable of forcing the air through a narrow space, hence higher pressure, due to their fan blade design.

    The high speed BeQuiet's have a static pressure of 3.37mm H2O, which means they use both a fan blade design which provides high pressure and a higher fan speed to double down on the cooling effect, at the cost of higher noise.

    As Tunski has pointed out, your choice of fans will depend on what radiators you are using. You may find that one of your rads has low fins per inch and would be perfectly happy with the slower, quieter, BeQuiet, but the other has higher fins per inch and better results would be obtained by using the faster, louder, NotSoQuiet.

    Either fan is likely to be a vast improvement over the Corsair case fans you've been using. Its not so much about CFM with rads, its about static pressure. A higher CFM is useless to you unless you can push that amount of air through small holes. It doesn't matter how big your bucket is if the drain is blocked :D

    Honestly, if the Corsair fans were doing the job, then the low speed BeQuiet fans would do the job better and should be ample.



    How loud is 28db? How long is a piece of string? Its not just decibels which are a factor when it comes to noise, it's also about the pitch. A lower pitch will usually be less annoying at the same volume than a higher pitch (although some low pitched noises can be annoying too). BeQuiet make their name (literally) about being as unobtrusive as possible, no BeQuiet fan should ever be annoying.

    Generally speaking though, assuming the pitch is not annoying, you could consider 20db to be a secret whisper in your ear meant for only you to hear, and 30db to be a louder whisper from a few metres away designed not to disturb the sleeping kids. 30db doesn't sound like much when described like that, but if your machine is next to you for long periods of time, you'll get sick of it eventually, unless you are constantly gaming with headphones on in which case only any other people in the house will give a shit.



    Another thing to remember is that you shouldn't need your fans running at max speed all the time anyway. If you need your fans running at full speed under light loads, you have a different cooling problem which needs to be sorted first.

    You could use the high speed version and control the fan speed with your motherboard to go faster when needed (when temps are higher), and slower (and therefore quieter) when temps are lower, using the BIOS or even software provided with your motherboard.

    PWM (4 pin) or DC (3 pin) fans are both speed controllable via the motherboard or an aftermarket controller. The 3 pin fan won't report its fan speed back in RPM like the 4 pin, so the motherboard simply allocates the speed as a percentage of max power, rather than a particular rpm, but the end result is the same. That's what the 4th pin is for on a PWM fan, it reports the current fan speed. Its a tachometer, that's all.



    Post which model of rads you have if you can, and you'll get better advice on fan choice.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2019
    juzz86 likes this.
  4. OP
    OP
    thedirkdiggler

    thedirkdiggler Member

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    Thanks for that info.
    My rads are a higher fpi, so I and going to buy the louder bequiet ones ( as also getting a new gpu card , more than likey a 2080 ). See how that goes.
    Time has moved on in the fan business. I don't know how old they are 4 or 5 years maybe.
    I have a :
    GA-z270x gaming K5 motherboard
    with a
    phanteks case with a fan splitter board on it.
    So to achieve what I want , plug the fan board into the cpu fan port on the motherboard?
     
  5. juzz86

    juzz86 Member

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    Yep. The fan splitter board takes a SATA for power and gives you a 4-pin PWM output. Plug that into your CPU_FAN header, and it'll ramp all your fans based on your CPU temperature - it'll essentially treat every fan you connect to it as a CPU fan.

    For alternate control, or to gain more granular control on older boards, plug the 4-pin into an OPT_FAN or SYS_FAN header. Where the CPU fans are often controlled from the CPU thermoprobe on older boards, the system fan headers usually gave you either a manual duty cycle or PWM factor selection, or a 'Silent', 'Standard' or 'Performance' set duty cycle.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    thedirkdiggler

    thedirkdiggler Member

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