1. If you're receiving a message that you are banned from the Current Events or Politics forums, it's not you specifically: those forums have been hidden for all users. For more info, see here.
    Dismiss Notice

Non responsiver or "laggy" (graphical) user interfaces. (Rant thread)

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Hardware' started by Bladen, Jun 12, 2011.

  1. Bladen

    Bladen Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2004
    Messages:
    995
    Location:
    Crazytown, pop 6 bil.
    I believe this is the most appropriate forum as it is about all technological devices that have some form of user interface.

    I am tired of devices that are slow or unresponsive to user input. I don't understand that new technology always gets bogged down with "prettyness" of user interfaces, instead of being sped up.

    My workplace just had a multifunction device upgraded. It was a fujixerox ApeosPort 450I, and it has been replaced with an ApeosPort-II 3000. It is a similar looking machine, but the new one has a bigger screen. The old one was not as responsive as it could have been, so I thought the new one would be better. It isn't, in fact it is slower. How is that an upgrade?

    My TV has always been extremely unresponsive to the remote when accessing the menu (it is not a flat battery), but every TV that I ever recall using has had an unresponsive menu GUI.

    My iRiver mp3 player is an absolute joke. It can't even scroll through a list of of songs (I have 530 on it atm), without the scrolling stopping for 1 to 2 seconds every 10 or 15 songs. When you choose to play a song, it takes 2 seconds to start. You can't change the volume in that time it takes to change the song.

    I am sure other people are annoyed at these issues too, why can't ODM's create something that isn't a chore to use?
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2011
  2. Reaper

    Reaper Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    12,159
    Location:
    Brisbane, Qld, Australia
    la la la-la LA LA LA la-la la la la boom-a-de-boom boom!

    Is is faster now?
     
  3. Sven76

    Sven76 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2002
    Messages:
    1,460
    Location:
    Bundaberg
    lol i got it :)
     
  4. SupremeMoFo

    SupremeMoFo Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2007
    Messages:
    5,008
    Location:
    Adelaide
    +1. good call.
     
  5. Andres

    Andres Motor Admin

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2004
    Messages:
    8,231
    Location:
    Adelaide
    Hundred percent agree!

    If your old enough to have experienced the user interface on phones like the old Nokia 8210, it was almost instantaneous. And infact you could have little shortcuts, by pressing 'menu', '2,2,1' and you'd instantly be typing a new message. My current phone (granted ageing) Moto Milestone is a test of patience everytime I use it...

    Thankfully my laptop with Win7 is very very snappy (and includes eyecandy too!)
     
  6. Hyram

    Hyram Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2009
    Messages:
    820
    One company does -- Apple.

    (And I'm pleased to see someone else use the term ODM -- good work :))

    Apple's core philosophy is "Interface first," and (as I ranted at length about over here) are about the only IT company that has figured out what it is that people don't want. Their first generation iPhone was lauded for its typically-Apple ease of use, but the geek-cursed bogosphere [1] derided the iPhone for its inability to multitask like other smartphones. Being geeks, of course, they could not understand why Apple intentionally denied multitasking in favour of keeping the UI responsive.

    It's taken Microsoft over twenty five years to finally catch on to what Apple were doing and why it made them so successful, and their turnabout to ease of use and responsive, intuitive interfaces can be seen in Windows 7 (they admitted they 'borrowed' a lot of Apple's UI ideas), the sadly short-lived Courier, and the brilliant Surface, with their Metro tile interface in the forthcoming Windows 8 an almost direct rip of Apple's iOS, which will replace OSX in two years.

    Until tech companies do something about excising the cancer of geekdom, and re-employ usability experts who actually know what they're doing, they are forever going to be dishing out problem-plagued products that's going to drive people into the greedy arms of the Church of Jobs.

    [1] Mis-spelling intentional; geeks inevitably get bogged down in the small stuff
     
  7. SLATYE

    SLATYE SLATYE, not SLAYTE

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2002
    Messages:
    26,857
    Location:
    Canberra
    I must agree with the above. While I don't like Apple as a company, getting a slick UI going is something that they're very, very good at.

    The lack of multitasking is still annoying, of course. I refuse to believe that when the CPU is executing well over ten billion instructions per second, it's not possible to have both good performance and multitasking. I'm sure that with a suitable RTOS and somewhat more deterministic hardware it'd be very possible to make guarantees about performance (ie "if the user clicks on an icon, the relevant program will get 10ms of CPU time immediately after that, and in that time it must display the complete GUI") but that sort of thing is difficult to do.

    One thing that particularly annoys me with most fancy UIs is the fading/sliding menus. Presumably they do take a fair bit of CPU time, since the manufacturer normally recommends disabling them on slower systems. What is the point of them? When I click on a menu, I want to see the menu. Preferably immediately. Not after five seconds of fading/sliding and eating CPU time.

    It's especially bad when the device isn't actually fast enough to do this and it pauses/jerks half way through the transition. The result looks far, far worse than if it had just displayed the new menu immediately. Even the iPad does this sometimes, although I've only seen it in non-Apple applications.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2011
  8. OP
    OP
    Bladen

    Bladen Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2004
    Messages:
    995
    Location:
    Crazytown, pop 6 bil.
    I don't get the "la la la-la LA LA LA la-la la la la boom-a-de-boom boom!" reference.

    The thing about Windows PCs, and to an extent Apple computers, is that the CPU, RAM, and HDD's can be upgraded, which will increase the responsiveness of the systems UI. Other products like MP3 players and TV's cannot have the same done.

    Some people like basic-ness, other's don't. I like my consumer electronic devices to be fairly customisable, particularly computers and phones. I don't see the harm in having the option of a decent level of customisability, if the device does not need to be customised for the it to completely carry out it's core functions properly.

    Yes another thing I don't like are those things. Even when they do work without pausing or jerking, it's basically enforced and intentional unresponsiveness. Madness!

    I think that manufactures/creators prioritise prettiness at the expense of usability. I don't think that doing so is a logical choice.
     
  9. SLATYE

    SLATYE SLATYE, not SLAYTE

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2002
    Messages:
    26,857
    Location:
    Canberra
    I think it is logical from their point of view. Pretty UI = pretty in-store demos = more sales.

    It may lower end-user productivity, but MS and Apple don't care about that.

    I'm pretty sure it's just because the OP wrote "choir" when he meant "chore".


    Upgrading the system will obviously help with responsiveness, but it shouldn't be necessary! You probably won't notice a 100ms delay in opening a menu; in that time the CPU has done upwards of 200,000,000 clock cycles (with many operations per cycle on modern CPUs) and the RAM can transfer more than one billion bytes of data. The HDD would have been able to seek to the right position and then read several million bytes of data, assuming it's not too badly fragmented. Surely any well-written software should be able to get to a usable state with those resources? But they very rarely do manage it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2011
  10. ^catalyst

    ^catalyst Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    11,978
    Location:
    melbourne
    So true,

    The Nokia phone example is perfect, I've got a 6700 that replaced a 6600 I dropped.

    I've never forgiven myself for dropping that phone. The OS was so simple and fast, amazing.

    New model, shit slow and complicated to use. Does nothing well.
     

Share This Page

Advertisement: