Nooby router/switch question

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by ya3, Oct 21, 2012.

  1. ya3

    ya3 Member

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    Ok, so consider this:
    [​IMG]

    Basically, I've got a 4 port modem/router and I'll eventually run out of ports, so I'm assuming I can simply connect something like this to my router in order to add ports.

    Will the router still assign addresses to devices connected to the switch? How does that work? Does the switch itself get an IP address? Do switches normally have web interfaces, assign addresses, etc, etc, like a router? I is noob.

    And what about the wireless clients? Would they be on the same subnet as the wired ones?

    I did some googling but am still confused.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2012
  2. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    yes same subnet and how the picture has it is how you want it..
     
  3. evilasdeath

    evilasdeath Member

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    Will the router still assign addresses to devices connected to the switch?

    Yes

    How does that work?

    The switch is just an extension of the layer 2 domain, a consumer router is just a router + a switch joined together.

    Does the switch itself get an IP address? Do switches normally have web interfaces, assign addresses, etc, etc, like a router?

    Depends how much you pay, simple dumb switches do not since they have no configuration items. More expensive switches do but just about any switch out of the box will do what you require to do with/without config



    The only thing i will say, depending on the router and the switch that you buy, you may be required to join them with a cross over cable (usually bright red)
     
  4. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    Domestic routers and Switches havn't required crossover cables for a long time it is all done internally now... please don't confuse the noob
     
  5. OP
    OP
    ya3

    ya3 Member

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    Easy! Thanks. Makes sense.

    So the router would still "see" each individual client connected via the switch, assign it an IP and be able to forward ports to it?

    Ya, I believe most routers have a designated 'uplink' port for this purpose.
     
  6. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    no any port on a Modem-router can be used (bar the phone point der...)

    you need to manually forward any special ports tot he device needing it


    Code:
    Modem/Router: Billion BiPac 7404VNPX  
    Output 1) My PC (via Cat5e)
    Output 2)
    Output 3) Wife’s PC (via Cat5e)
    Output 4) Cat5e to TP-Link 5port switch
    VoIP 1) 
    Wi-Fi
    -------My Asus Eeepc
    -------Wii
    -------MY HTC Desire HD
    ------ Wife’s Nokia N8
    ------ 
    
    TP-Link Switch
    Port 1) NoonTek Media player in Bedroom
    Port 2) HTPC
    Port 3) HFS (via Cat5e)
    Port 4) HFS (via Cat5e)
    Port 5) Output from 7404
    
    Like this but to do with your hardware..
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2012
  7. trackhappy

    trackhappy Member

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    A dumb switch will just work. It has no bearing on what the router does, the router doesn't even see it. All it sees is more devices to assign addresses to, and since the switch does not have an IP address nor does it need one, it'll just work without any configuration.

    About the only bloody thing in the world of networking that (generally) "just works".
     
  8. Hive

    Hive Member

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    True, but then you come across managed switches ;)
     

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