Perpetual Linux Distro Thread

Discussion in 'Other Operating Systems' started by Geo, Mar 30, 2002.

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  1. waltermitty

    waltermitty Member

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    Probably none
     
  2. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Seconded.

    IBM have been doing Linux and open source for a long time. Don't forget they're the ones who footed the billions of dollars of lawyers fees to protect Linux from SCO (and their "mysterious backer"), not to mention they've been buying up stupid patents just to protect open source for decades.

    IBM are good folk when it comes to open source. They're interested in milking governments for lucrative service contracts, not destroying software ecosystems.
     
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  3. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    People with existing RHEL service contracts might see a change in their price structures when it comes time to renegotiate. IBM is seldom the least expensive option, although I'm not truly aware of how Redhat compares price-wise.
     
  4. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Might go up, might go down, might stay the same. Pointless to speculate or fear monger this early on.
     
  5. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    *hopefully* wireguard is going to get merged this merge window, ready for 4.20 or 5.0 depending on what linus ends up naming it...
     
  6. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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  7. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    I'm not advocating panic, but I hope we can speculate without working ourselves up into a frenzy.
     
  8. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    *sigh*
    https://github.com/Microsoft/ProcDump-for-Linux

    Because we didn't know gcore or kill -ABRT exist!
    http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man1/gcore.1.html
    Granted they added metrics to crash on, but would it have hurt them to add functionality to gcore rather ten wrap it in bastardized Windows command fuctionality!
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2018
  9. kogi

    kogi Member

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    Looking at a graphics card update soon. nVidia or ATI? I exclusively use mint, and I don't see it changing any time in the future
     
  10. RnR

    RnR Member

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    Doesn't really matter for Mint from what I understand. Mainly depends if you like your drivers to open sourced, or closed sourced. Or if you have specific workloads... I think nVidia still has an advantage when it comes to gpu accelerated AI work.

    Just had a quick look at Ubuntu Budgie... very tidy stuff. Anyone using it for their daily? Been using Mint for a while and feel like a change :)
     
  11. waltermitty

    waltermitty Member

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    Don't give nVidia your money!
     
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  12. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    Bit of a challenge when you need to be able to test CUDA code :p

    EDIT - Plus, last I checked their video decoding is still way better
     
  13. self_slaughter

    self_slaughter Member

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    AMD cards are comparatively slow, but cheap and their open source drivers are quite good, so the out of the box experience is flawless as it just works.

    Nvidias a lot faster (and pricier), but their open source drivers suck and you need to use their closed source drivers, which have some quirks. So long as you use your distros package manager to look after the nvidia drivers, it's not that big of a deal for the main part. Although don't touch SLI with a 10 ft pole. What a nightmare that was on linux. lol
     
  14. kogi

    kogi Member

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  15. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    I'm *almost* tempted to start a Great Python 2 EOL Thread, but for those of you on various other distros, how's everyone handling the deprecation of python 2.7 in a year? I'm vaguely tempted to try completely getting rid of python2 now just to find out what is still entirely borken on gentoo, but curious how other distros are going. I'm guessing treating it just like they've treated the GCC4.x deprecation though :p
     
  16. lazjen

    lazjen Member

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    Save me the effort - let me know how it goes. :)
     
  17. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    Just looking at available PYTHON_TARGETS for the packages I have installed, the red flags I see are:

    yasm - problematic cause there's quite a few things that depend on it including ffmpeg and chromium
    dia
    calibre
    virtualbox (!)

    Dia and calibre are just annoying rather than a major problem. Searching calibre's bug history the maintainer's shown zero interest in porting to python3, so that'll be interesting. I'm not sure how hard the virtualbox dep is, but that's a bigish issue if it's a real dependancy. Yasm appears to be being actively ported right now.

    The rest of the packages I'm seeing with no python3 support are just backports to python2 that dont matter
     
  18. BelowAverageIQ

    BelowAverageIQ Member

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    Not sure if the correct thread, didnt really want to start my own (actually I do have one for my "server").

    Setting up a server for the first time. Primarily for hosting game files/games such as DayZ, Rust, etc. Nothing fancy, just using spare parts I have left over, so not a dedicated hardware server machine. (Intel 6700K, HDD, M.2 16GB memory, all in a 2RU chassis).

    I was "going" to use Windows Server........... until I looked at the cost :wired:

    Obviously now going to use a Linux based distro. I have NEVER even looked at Linux before. Been reading through some of the sticky's and other threads and will probably install Ubuntu. Do I install the regular Ubuntu or "server" version?

    Not had much experience with command line, so would prefer a GUI if possible?

    Cheers

    BIQ
     
  19. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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  20. HyRax1

    HyRax1 ¡Viva la Resolutión!

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    Server and Desktop are the same. They just have slightly different kernels that prioritise background or foreground tasks, and the server version doesn't install a GUI by default (but you can if you want).

    Build two machines, one server, one desktop, so you can get a proper feel for both without deliberately installing a GUI on the server. You are actually better off installing something like Webmin on the server so you can manage it through a web browser on your Desktop. And many server services (such as web server, DNS server, SQL server, etc) is already conveniently packaged up for you. At the terminal prompt, just type in "sudo tasksel", hit enter and choose what functionality you want to be installed/removed (you can also do this on the Desktop version).

    After that, it's then a case of understanding where configuration files are and their syntax. Again, this is where Webmin can help you because it edits those files for you in a funky GUI and tells you which file it is editing - you can even directly edit the file via Webmin's own text editor in your web browser if you want.

    You can also run GUI apps on the Server without needing an actual GUI installed on the server too! But you don't really need that anymore these days.
     

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