Perpetual Linux Distro Thread

Discussion in 'Other Operating Systems' started by Geo, Mar 30, 2002.

  1. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    Why in the seven hells of bad naming ideas would you fork centos with the name Rocky Linux, when the very centos-based, very-long-existing, possibly most used cluster linux distribution on earth is called Rocks Cluster Distribution...
     
  2. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    Rocks has a completely different purpose. The closest analog was Scientific Linux, but SL also ended a couple years ago in favour of Centos.

    The key requirements will be build infrastructure and a testing community.
     
  3. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    First thing that came to mind for me too. But I also appreciate the gesture of naming a whole distro after someone you respect.

    Either way, a name is a name. Open source is merit based, and with any luck the sheer volume of angst over the CentOS Stream change generates people motivated to actually contribute, rather than just moan about it on the Internet.
     
  4. chip

    chip Member

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    Rocks Cluster hasn't had a new release in years, none of the HPC cluster admins I've talked to have used it in years.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2020
  5. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    Tools have moved on. Anaconda isn't the place to inject this stuff anymore.
     
  6. schnappy

    schnappy Member

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    Can anyone give me a reason to not use pfSense for a firewall appliance on a HP thin client? OPNsense worth considering?
     
  7. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    Netgate is beginning to close off pfSense development.
     
  8. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    https://www.netgate.com/blog/pfsense-plus-pfsense-ce-dev-insights-direction.html
    As we do the delicate work on transitioning towards Clixon as our middleware, that code, and the new GUI built on top of it, is only going to be in pfSense Plus. This keeps the disruption contained to a smaller set of our users that are more tightly coupled with the hardware, our appliances, that we know intimately. Simply put, we’ll be able to work faster and with more confidence in this environment. The good news is that we also plan to make pfSense Plus available to work on non-Netgate hardware in late 2021, not just our appliances, and we plan to make the licensing of pfSense Plus completely free for home, hobby, and lab use. This will overlap nicely with the planned pfSense CE releases, and we will be including a seamless transition mechanism to go from CE to Plus. In the end, we want to give our users a compelling reason to make the switch, but for those who can’t or won’t make the switch, there will still be future pfSense CE releases to look forward to. There will be CE releases after 2.6, but unlike Plus, they’ll be done when they’re ready, not on a regular cadence.

    Should be a non-issue for home users, in the immortal words of Public Enemy.
    hype.jpg
     
  9. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    I remember the whole Larry McVoy fiasco, and my Bitkeeper senses are tingling.

    It never hurts to examine your alternatives. I understand IPFire supports IS-IS.
     
  10. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Understand, but Netgate comes from a long commitment to open source, the issue is other hardware manufactures leverage off their work and not giving back appropriately based on the licensing. Pretty much no different to Redhat's current stance.

    https://github.com/pfsense/pfsense
    Ready for forking by the community.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2021
  11. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    This attitude really bothers me. The community doesn't owe them any more than what's specified in the license.

    RH's contributions to the code base are their advantage as it gives them an exceptional knowledge base from which to deliver support. Their subscribers don't pay for update packages so much as they pay for engineers who will open issue tickets to fix problems that affect them, even if it means bespoke patches which will then be kicked upstream. SUSE is the same, as is OEL (with the rancid, oily sheen of Larry Ellison as a bonus).

    Netgate can and seemingly do operate in that space with an additional hardware component. Their product has a solid reputation. Why do they endanger their professional image by behaving so childishly at times? They have no reason to complain if people fork their code and do what the ASL license (or BSD license for earlier states of the tree) entitles them to do.
     
  12. eixt

    eixt Member

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    I'm massively out of the loop here. Whats up with Netgate and pfSense?
    I'm a long time user from back in the m0n0wall days. I've found them to always be very reputable and they have replaced a couple of devices outside of warranty which they didn't really have to do. Whats the beef with them atm or historically?
     
  13. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    They are adding a new automated deployment layer using Clixon as part of https://www.tnsr.com/ and rewriting the interface away from PHP to Go, in the mean time they are releasing 2.5 and committed to 2.6 of pfSense CE. So in the future you will have to use pfSense+ to get the newer modified version after 2.6, which if for commercial use will require you to purchase licenses.

    After 2.6 that will be it for Netgate and pfSense CE as the newer product will diverge away from the old M0n0wall fork.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2021
  14. eixt

    eixt Member

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    Hmm that's a little shitty, just reading the FAQs and it doesn't take too much to read between the lines they won't be contributing to the open-source side of things anywhere near as much
     
  15. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    They also had a strange feud with OPNsense and have some weird rules for which Redmine tickets disappear. Some things going on which don't seem healthy.
    https://forums.servethehome.com/index.php?threads/pfsense-a-meltdown-of-a-different-sort.18438/

    I guess it may work out in the end, but it really does remind me of the Bitkeeper fiasco.
     
  16. schnappy

    schnappy Member

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    Thanks, seems home user nerds like me are preferencing OPNsense so I'll give that a go first and see if it works as well as I hope. It seems the go-to way for PI Hole like functionality is to run PI Hole in a VM, no big deal but a bit convoluted, whereas pfSense has pfBlockerNG.
     
  17. waltermitty

    waltermitty Member

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    lol netgate fucked up implementing wireguard for freebsd and lost their shit
     
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  18. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    As much as I'm the card carrying open source fanboi, I don't think it's shitty. I think it's just human nature, and open source overcomes that.

    pfSense would be the third or fourth popular firewall distro I've used. When they go, something will replace it. This is the nature of open source - change is constant, merit prevails.

    If you're old like me, you'll remember all the drama and infighting around the Smoothwall software firewall distribution, and the rather despicable CEO Richard "Dick" Morrell who was at the centre of it all. Nearly two decades later, that product has been replaced several times over as the popular tool, and Morrell has been long forgotten.

    This is pfSense's future, by their own hand. I'm not upset, because something else will fill the void, and likely improve on all the things pfSense struggled with (like pfSense improved on all the things other distros struggled with prior to its existence).

    A great example of something pfSense struggled with. In a world where most of my clients routinely have gigabit Internet, WireGuard as a site-to-site and site-to-cloud solution is now a mandatory tool, I feel.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2021
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  19. waltermitty

    waltermitty Member

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  20. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    That certainly makes sense for existing customers. I think the calculus is a little different for new users.

    Is pfSense sinking (i.e. rapidly becoming less suitable for any given user)? If it is, definitely don't jump on board.
     

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