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Perpetual Linux Distro Thread

Discussion in 'Other Operating Systems' started by Geo, Mar 30, 2002.

  1. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    MB, Canada
    You had a bed?
     
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  2. z3099528

    z3099528 Member

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    Awesome Montypythonisms aside, I've finally re-installed a linux distro for my son's repurposed laptop after a hiatus since 2011 (I last used ubuntu 11.04, crunchbang! and a couple of livecds for rescue). wow how things have changed - no need for fglrx, but the hoops to install a new os using efi was painful! I'm currently running lubuntu 21.04 with cinnamon as the main ide. Anyone running debian unstable[stable today] (bullseye)? I'd like to wack it on but I've forgotten if I need to enable non-free repos for the intel and amd firmwares.
     
  3. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    https://wiki.debian.org/NvidiaGraphicsDrivers#Debian_11_.22Bullseye.22

    AMD replace buster with bullseye
    https://linuxconfig.org/how-to-install-the-latest-amd-drivers-on-debian-10-buster

    PS - just use Ubuntu or Mint unless you want to learn some stuff.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2021
    z3099528 likes this.
  4. kogi

    kogi Member

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    Because of steam deck hype decided to try arch today.

    Install has come a long way, now it's just archinstall for a guided installed, quick & simple

    6700xt still isn't working at the moment, investigation on how to update firmware & mesa on arch
     
  5. mjunek

    mjunek Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2003
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    1,146
    Location:
    Western Sydney
    Thursday night I dropped OpenSUSE on my desktop. Ran it all of Friday; but today I've rebooted into Windows as there are just too many niggly issues to make it productive for work. I'm quite disappointed, as I want to break the cycle with using Windows but the issues just hurt too much.

    These are mostly related to the way connectivity into work is set up, and Linux support from vendors sadly; so there's not much I can do about it.
    * No display scaling in Citrix Receiver. I can set the scaling once inside the VDI, but any resolution changes (such as resizing the window) causes the VDI to switch back to 100%
    * Evolution cannot connect to O365 as we've blocked all Non-Microsoft apps from connecting. A real PITA seeing 'email' is no longer standards based. So productivity hurts with OWA.
    * MS Teams Linux client is around a year behind on development, and misses key features - background blur, noise suppression, meetings in separate windows to main client.

    There are a few other bits and bobs I need to sort out too, which should be possible with more time:
    * Disabling Turbo Boost- this is to prevent the fans from spinning up in the little machine, they get loud (also needed given no noise suppression in Teams!)
    * Logitech keyboard illumination - I might just need to switch it off if the software is not available as it does it's annoying startup wave continuously.
    * Figuring out better video hardware acceleration - I'm only on the inbuilt Intel UHD 630 graphics; I feel that the display could be a bit smoother sometimes.
    * Display scaling not quite right - some apps look a big wonky - although I'm almost there getting it sorted - mostly getting the fonts configured.

    That said, despite the Teams limitations, I really like the fact that Microsoft have gone ahead and produced a Teams Client, and MS Edge for Linux. It's a good start down the right road, and I really hope that there is more development effort put into this path.

    I might end up get around some of the deal-breakers by running a Win10 VM and running some of the MS Apps (Outlook I'm looking at you) inside it and see how that goes.
     
  6. Slug69

    Slug69 Member

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    1F224F6A-9521-4916-90FA-CC448B70D25C.jpeg 50 years old.
     
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  7. Bern

    Bern I knew this would happen one day...

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    When I was at school, we didn't even have calculators, Abacus Rules!
     
  8. Blinky

    Blinky Member

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    School? School? Ha Luxury! We didn’t have time for school what with the work’s at coal mine & then off to Mill to push the grinder stone around.

    … and you tell that to kids today and they wooon’t believe ya!
     
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  9. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Pfft when I was a lad we didn't have Tik Tok and our family only had 1 television, and when we wanted to watch a show we had to be free at specific time of the day.

    Try and tell kids today and they don't believe you.
     
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  10. Blinky

    Blinky Member

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    Has anyone tried the latest Deepin release, thoughts on the DDE?
     
  11. StevOz

    StevOz Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Quindalup, W.A.
    Windows install finally killed my old SSD to an unrecoverable state, so Manjaro and my old Nokia 7 plus to the rescue. I had a 32 GB USB stick with micro USB C to USB3, and was able to create a bootable image with this Android app.

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=eu.depau.etchdroid

    A great app, simple and worked great, thankfully as a longtime Firefox user, I recovered all my links and passwords, got a full install now running a treat from an external USB3 portable Samsung SSD T5 1TB drive I got on special.

    PC specs in attachment. New OS install is running great, no issues and a few improvements I might add.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 20, 2022
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  12. VirtualNinja

    VirtualNinja Member

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    Can I get a recommendation for a linux distro, for someone who is a PC noob but is kind of familiar with windows but is paranoid AF. Usage browsing, music ripping and playing and office document stuff.
     
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  13. t0mmy44

    t0mmy44 Member

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    Melburbia, VIC
    Linux Mint for Windows familiarity, from all accounts I've received.
     
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  14. konholyoh

    konholyoh Member

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    Melb
    Linux Mint Cinnamon.
    Latest version is 20.3 Una.

    https://linuxmint.com/
     
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  15. Blinky

    Blinky Member

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    Choose something on a live USB stick at first. :)
     
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  16. RnR

    RnR Member

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    3rd recommendation for Mint Linux... even my parents grok it. I use it as my daily dev machine.
     
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  17. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    I like MX
     
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  18. HobartTas

    HobartTas Member

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    It seems like Mint is the best choice also according to the author of this article Why the Linux desktop is the best desktop which is an interesting read as well as the comments posted.
     
  19. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Best choice for who/what exactly?
    • ALL versions of Mint are downstream versions of Ubuntu LTS which is downstream versions of Debian.
    • Basically Mint doesn't write software (limited knowledge as I don't use Mint) it packages software making "opinionated" decisions on what the OS is to the end user.
    • One mans opinion of good is another mans opinion of appalling, but unlike other OS's available you have 100s of choices as a end-user.
    Mint is a good choice for the novice user who doesn't understand how software is distributed inside the Linux eco system, nor understands what makes a Linux distribution and how ANY Linux distribution can use the same software as any other distribution within the same package manager branch of the Linux family tree.

    Not sure Mint still publishes this file but look in.
    Code:
    cat /etc/upstream-release/lsb-release
    or
    Code:
    cat /etc/os-release
    Code:
    Version  Codename   Package base
    20          Ulyana         Ubuntu Focal
    19.3       Tricia            Ubuntu Bionic
    19.2       Tina              Ubuntu Bionic
    19.1       Tessa           Ubuntu Bionic
    Source: https://frameboxxindore.com/linux/what-version-of-ubuntu-is-linux-mint-20-based-on.html
     
  20. elvis

    elvis OCAU's most famous and arrogant know-it-all

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    I continue to recommend Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Support). Why?

    * Desktop focussed. Ubuntu itself is based on Debian, which is an excellent, stable, and long term active distro (began life in 1993, and is constantly update and improved to this day). However despite Debian's tried and true stability, their efforts are more generic, and things like desktop tools are very default. Ubuntu puts a lot of effort into ensuring their desktop experience is great, and especially targets users who might not be familiar with Linux.

    * Huge community. Mint, Pop_OS, Cinnamon - these are all "downstream" releases of Ubuntu. And while they aim to make things a little "better" (typically prettier), their glaring downside is their smaller communities. It's almost impossible to count Linux users (Linux's commitment to privacy means that you can't find user numbers like you can with other OSes that identify their users easily online, or companies that track their user's purchases). But Ubuntu is estimated to have somewhere between 50-80 million users, and 95% of the Linux desktop market. Why does that matter? Because if you've got a problem and something breaks, the more users there are with the same distro as you, the more likely someone's found a solution to your bug.

    * Stable. Ubuntu comes in two flavours - a regular release, and an LTS release. Release numbers are formatted in YY.MM - so "21.10" was released in the 10th month (October) of 2021. What Ubuntu does is, every 2 years, release an LTS (Long Term Support) release, typically on the XX.04 (April) month of every even year. 20.04 (April 2020) was the last LTS release, and 22.04 (April 2022) is due for release very soon (currently in final release candidate mode). Regular releases only get 18 months of support before being discarded, whereas LTS releases see 5 years of dedicated security patching and driver updates.

    * Great third party support. Right now in 2022, Ubuntu is still the ONLY desktop Linux officially supported by Valve / Steam:
    https://help.steampowered.com/en/faqs/view/1114-3F74-0B8A-B784
    https://github.com/ValveSoftware/steam-for-linux
    https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Valve

    Yes, Steam can run on almost any distro. But we can all show you some pretty hilarious events that have happened where less-than-expert users have attempted to use Steam against their recommended client, and disaster struck. You too can be smarter than an idiot YouTuber, and follow best practices.

    While 22.04 isn't at full public release today (full release is due within a week or two), you can still install it now, and just via the simple GUI package manage / app store, update it to the final release when that arrives (no need to reinstall).

    22.04 has been codenamed "Jammy Jellyfish", because Ubuntu like to name their releases alphabetically and with a cute African animal name to match.

    Ultimately, you can do whatever you want. Try any distro you want. But the above are the things that, for me, make a good distro.

    People like to point to boutique distros because "they look nicer", but I think that's pointless. You can change desktops and skin Ubuntu to look like anything you want (don't like the default GNOME3 desktop? Change it to KDE or Cinnamon or LXQt or XFCE or whatever the hell you want - failing that, just play with themes. There's thousands of skins and wallpapers and themes to choose from). All of what Mint and Cinnamon and Pop_OS offer, you can add with the click of a button, without needing to switch to a distro that has a fraction of the userbase or development guarantee behind it.

    People like to distro hop because of pre-bundled apps. Again, pointless, when Ubuntu provides a 100% GUI app store packed full of open source software you can install, for free, with a single click. No scary command line needed.

    Ubuntu LTS specifically keeps you going for at least 2 years, and with their 5 year commitment means you don't have to upgrade to the next release straight away if you don't want to. They also put a lot of effort into their upgrade tools, meaning that upgrades from an old LTS (18.04, 20.04, etc) to a current LTS (22.04) are also 100% GUI driven, and can be done with the click of a button.

    What matters to me are the above points. How reliable is it (including how long has the company making it been around, and are they likely to vanish tomorrow?). How large is the community (more people using it means more support, and more people who are likely to have the same hardware configurations as me), and how stable is it - am I going to get a solid core that won't break, but also good quality driver updates for modern hardware? How long can I run the distro before I'm forced to upgrade?

    Ubuntu ticks all of these boxes for me, and provides a user-focussed desktop system that isn't propeller-head territory, is fully customisable, and is supported for a good chunk of time. Boutique distros might look nice at a skin-deep level, but everything they offer is a mouse-click away, so I just don't see the point for someone who is new to Linux to bother with.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2022
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