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Philips Noodle and Pasta Maker (RICE NOODLES)

Discussion in 'Geek Food' started by Stonewall, Jul 18, 2016.

  1. Stonewall

    Stonewall Member

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    Anyone here got one of these machines?

    Thinking about getting one mainly to make rice noodle though.

    They go have a receipe for it but it uses Xanthum Gum, not sure how that would help/change the texture.

    Anyone here made it before?

     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2016
  2. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    I have the machine but I've never made that yet.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Stonewall

    Stonewall Member

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    How do you find the machine?


    For me the rice noodles would be the big star as fresh rice noodles can transform dishes. Just curious what the gum would do the taste/texture?
     
  4. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    I find it in the cupboard..... I haven't used it yet. My kitchen has been a disaster area, but I plan to get the stuff back in the cupboards soon and to start using it. I mainly plan on using it for egg noodles because I've got chooks and need to use eggs.

    I've no clue what rice noodles are made from. What do the bought ones have in them? Maybe that's a necessary ingredient?
     
  5. Lucifers Mentor

    Lucifers Mentor Member

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    I haven't made rice noodles yet, but I've seen a few recipes with Xanthum Gum or agar agar in them - so it seems to be a common way of approaching rice noodles.
     
  6. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    agar agar is like gelatin, I didn't really know what xanthum gum is. It's probably to bind the noodles. Pasta/egg noodles have the egg as the binding agent. Rice/water (what's in rice noodles, anything else?) wouldn't stick together, you'd need something to make it stick. That's what it'd be for, I reckon. It's the "egg-equivalent".
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Stonewall

    Stonewall Member

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    Looks like the "normal" way to make rice noodles is to cook them in a sheet then slice. So your right I guess just wondering if it will change the texture of the rice noodle. Normal recipes have no binder. I guess to use this machine you need to replace that cooked method with a binder.

    Just that with rice noodles especially some dishes the "freshness" of the rice noodles makes a radical difference. Grew up with eating dry rice noodles and compared to fresh it's like chalk to cheese.
     
  8. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    same with egg pasta, different kettle of fish entirely.

    I've never had fresh rice noodles (not that I know of, anyway) so I wouldn't be able to give you a comparison if I made them in the machine (which I'm now keen on doing, BTW). I expect they'd be nicer than dried ones, even if they aren't as nice as the fresh ones you are used to.
     
  9. ck_psy

    ck_psy Member

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    do you mean fresh as in not dried or frozen?

    I see fresh rice noodles all the time in asian grocery shops.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Stonewall

    Stonewall Member

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    Its completely different. You can buy fresh ones in the shops. Especially fried.

    If you do make it try this receipe.
    http://www.thaitable.com/thai/recipe/noodles-in-gravy

    Don't forget the vinegar and chili sauce and white pepper. I use the shoulder pork or scotch cut. Cook it for a few hours at low temp to get the meat nice and juicy.

    Thick wide noodles go great with this dish.

    Yea Fresh, the dried ones are terrible.


    I do buy fresh ones normally. A few reasons to make them myself.
    1. Looks like they don't get stuck together like the store bought ones. Can spend 5-10 minutes getting them unstuck with varying degrees of success.
    2. Can make them wider which suits certain dishes.
    3. Can be hard to get, (run out of stock or almost near use by date).
     
  11. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    That looks awesome, didn't even know you could get those. Will have to do some research tonight.
     
  12. sormuijai

    sormuijai Member

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    We have one of these. Was easy to use and simple to clean. Pasta / noodles turned out quite nice. This is good for simple egg noodles or wheat noodles.

    For rice noodles, this won't work. If you are after thick flat rice noodles like your recipe, it is actually made using a rice water / paste mixture which you pour onto a flat surface and steam (kinda like crepes). You can then slice to whatever width you want.

    For the thicker rice noodles (like udon), you use a much thicker dough and CAN use this machine but could get messy. We make our own using a potato press and press the noodles directly into a pot of boiling water. I don't know how well it will hold up being handled as its quite a sticky/wet texture.
     
  13. lithos

    lithos Member

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    Gluten is what sticks pasta and wheat noodles together, and rice has none.

    The traditional way to make rice noodles is to beat it, quite literally, into submission.
     
  14. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    The recipe says to stand there and add flour if it gets too sticky, so it seems like it is quite messy to do. The recipes they have are for laksa and for pad thai. I'm not sure what the noodles used in those are like, I've never made them at home.
     
  15. sormuijai

    sormuijai Member

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    It gets messy because there is no gluten holding the noodles together. They are fragile if you are man handling them, hence why we press the noodles directly into boiling water.

    Laksa generally uses dried rice vermicelli and Pad thai usually uses a dry rice noodle that's been rehydrated.

    I wouldn't use the pasta maker for either of these. Easier to just buy from the shops. We actually have a rice noodle steamer imported from China. Lets just say, we're still buying our rice noodles from the shops :) Its ok for making steamed rice noodles with prawns etc like yum cha. But if you want to make enough rice noodles to do a stir fry, just go buy it.

    The noodle maker is good for pasta and normal noodles. The recipes they provide are quite spot on, only slight adjustments depending on weather and humidity.
     
  16. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    that's what the gum is for, I suppose.... to hold it together? I just want to have a go at it to see what happens.... :lol:

    EDIT: They don't look sticky at all....
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1YeJhBGOQc
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2016
  17. OP
    OP
    Stonewall

    Stonewall Member

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    I assume that is why you need the xanthum gum. To hold it together till you cook it.

    It does say to boil the noodles before using them.
     
  18. OP
    OP
    Stonewall

    Stonewall Member

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    Pad Thai with a fresh noodle is a lot better, but harder to keep the noodles from breaking.

    Just debating is it worth getting just for the pasta/noodles, if it does a half decent rice noodle, then it is definitely worth it.
     
  19. doug81

    doug81 Member

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    xanthan gum is a thickener, use it in icecream making at home as it thickens/sets when heat is applied. It's like an extreme cornstarch, I use 1/4 tsp in a 1.5l icecream mix and it sets like a thick custard/marshmallow. Check the health food bit in coles/woolies and you'll find it...
     

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