Pork ribs on the Weber disaster

Discussion in 'Geek Food' started by ricee007, Jan 2, 2021.

  1. ricee007

    ricee007 Member

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    Hiya,

    I have a Weber Q, so thought I would cook two racks of pork ribs on there - I normally use an oven.

    I patted them down with paper towel, then rubbed a mix of about 10 herbs and spices on them, left them in the fridge for a few hours.

    Then put the WeberQ on high, then made a mop sauce - red wine vinegar, worsetechire, brown sugar, salt, dijon mustard, etc.

    I then put the ribs on, and immediately turned the weberq down to low.

    I basted it woth the mop sauce 3 times over the hour.

    After an hour, they were burnt to a crisp. I had intended on cooking for two hours on low. When i took it off, the temperature on the weberq thermometer was 200degrees.

    I clearly cooked them too hot, but given the weberq was on as absolute low as it can go for the entire time the ribs were on, i dont really understand.

    Should i have not started the weberq on high (i wanted to sear / burn off the rubbish from the previous bbq)?

    Should i have cooked with the lid open? If so, still on low? Or medium? I think the temperature drops to like 70degrees with the lid open, but thats not a reliable measure as the temperature probe is then in the air. Should i have just not used a weberq at all? Did i need to use a rack - i just put them on the grill plates?

    Thanks
     
  2. darknebula

    darknebula Member

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    Something like that I’d usually have on the roasting trivet so they are not making direct contact with the grill. Under the trivet you would have either a roasting tray or perforated foil. You can still sear them first and then move them onto the trivet. Normally if I turn mine down it hovers around 150-160
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2021
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  3. Benno1988

    Benno1988 Member

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    Need to use a rack. You cant put anything on the hotplate or grill and it not be burnt after an hour. You can lay foil under the rack too to further protect from flames. You basically want to roast them in there, and maybe finish them with a bit of direct hotplate time.
     
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  4. guy.incogneto

    guy.incogneto Member

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    Slow cooking is cooking at 80 to 100 degrees for a few hours. Which on a bbq can only be done with offset type cooking. Burners on at one end of the bbq and the meat sitting on the other end.

    Your best bet would be in the oven for a few hours. Would come out much the same, using a gas bbq without grilling is only heat as well so no char taste benefit.
     
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  5. Revenge

    Revenge Member

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    Weber Q isn't the best for that sort of BBQ'ing. If I am trying to do anything like that in mine I normally make a mat out of a few layers of foil and place it on top of the grill to insulate the food from direct heat exposure.
     
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  6. Squatting_Tiger

    Squatting_Tiger Member

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    Buy a Weber charcoal bbq
     
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  7. OP
    OP
    ricee007

    ricee007 Member

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    Thanks all.

    Ive had pretty good success with the oven, but i think i'll try off-set bbq on my 6-burner next. If that doesnt work, I will give up and go back to the oven!

    Ive got a weber vegie roasting plate - which ive never used - but, ill start using it for some other things, based on the above feedbackm

    Unfortunately, i cant justify a charcol weber, given i have a 6 burner and the weberq already! Becoming a smoke pro is tempting, but that might have to wait til the next house!
     
  8. guy.incogneto

    guy.incogneto Member

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    Sell everything and get a Weber kettle :leet:

    Nothing beats coal grill
     
  9. fnp

    fnp Member

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    I have a $20 generic charcoal kettle from Bunnings that works very well. I start it going as hot as it can get (pointing a fan at the coals gets it really hot) to sear off the ribs with the lid open. Drizzle a bit of oil onto the ribs before you put them on the grill can help. Once both sides of the ribs have bit of a char they go onto the elevated rack with the lid closed but propped open about an inch to let the smoke out. Close the air intake vents. Adjust the lid opening to maintain the temperature around 140° or so. Let them go like that until the meat is tender enough to fall off the bones (you'll be able to feel if you gently try to pick them up or move them). A container of water helps to keep the temperature even, I usually use an empty soup can or an alfoil container. Same technique can be used for roasts with appropriate adjustment of cooking times.

    IMO no need for a Weber. They're better insulated and use a bit less fuel but you can get very good results out of any charcoal barbeque. It's mostly a matter of practice and a few test runs until you understand how your particular BBQ behaves with certain meats and cooking methods. Don't be discouraged if your first try was no good. There's a bit of experimentation and practice involved in charcoal BBQs. Do a few test runs until you're confident before you try cooking for a big party.

    Unfortunately I don't think Bunnings sell the $20 one any more but it's similar to this. I've had it about three years now and it's gotten a lot of use. Hard to argue for the cost. I also like that it's portable and so easy to clean, I just use a wirebrush to scrape off all the shit and let it burn off in the coals. Next time I fire it up it burns off any remaining stuff, I've never done any more cleaning than that. Turning it off is as simple as closing the vents and closing the lid and clipping the handle in place.

    [​IMG]
    https://www.shaokoo.com/pt-br/products/foldable-kettle-mini-charcoal-bbq-grill

    I have an charcoal offset smoker I also really like but really I only use that if I need to cook a fair bit of food either grilling or smoking, the little kettle is just easier, more convenient and sufficient for a small smoke, a couple of large steaks or a butterflied whole chicken. I also have a conventional gas BBQ which I like for the instant on ability but that's about all I really use it for or if I have lots of people and got all the BBQs going at once. Fourth BBQ is a Bunnings charcoal spit roaster which was $79 which can also double as a grill. That thing is awesome.

    Yes, I have lots of BBQs but they're all cheap ones and it gives you so much versatility and the ability to cook an absolute shedload of meats with differing methods if you so wish. I urge you to get into the world of charcoal BBQs :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2021
  10. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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  11. Schred

    Schred Member

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    Exactly. Everything like this that I’ve ever cooked on my Weber Q has been done with a double layer of foil and a roasting trivet on top. It works beautifully.

    Not sure if he’s still active, but there was a prolific poster named “Captain Cook” on an Aus BBQ forum who used to demonstrate Weber Qs and was something of an enthusiast. He had a PDF cook book that was awesome. A quick Google search turned this up:

    https://aussiecue.freeforums.net/thread/181/captains-weber-recipe-useful-hints
     
  12. Stooge007

    Stooge007 Member

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    i thought on the Weber Qs, you could wrap foil around the gas jets to effectively block off say 50% of the flame (to reduce the overall temp)?

    and the thermometer on your Weber is likely to be out by 0-20*C
     
  13. newynut

    newynut Member

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    They are usually spot on. Weber do make good gear.
     
  14. Radley

    Radley Member

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    Agree with others you need indirect heat which is achieved by offsetting the meat to the flame, or by covering one side of the bby and putting the meat on a rack.

    Except the effort and pre-planning required to just cook a steak. Not worth it. Can't beat it for roats meat and potatoes though.
     
  15. KANNIS

    KANNIS Member

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    Weber kettle will work, move the coals to one side and make a hot side. Leave the other side with no coals which is the cold side. Cook with a rack over the cold side, low and slow.

    What effort? Buy a coal starter, fill the top up, light the bottom and off you go.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 10, 2021
  16. Cryogenic

    Cryogenic News Monkey

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    I think they are quite accurate but I think it depends on where the gauge is located relative to the heat? I did a slow brisket on the weekend over 12 hours and the gauge was reading 130 average for the whole cook. But I had the briquettes around the outside of the kettle and wanted the smoke to flow over the meat so the vent was opposite to the fire. The meat came out wonderful. Certainly not overcooked so I reckon that the comment about it being out is probably right, depending on where the gauge is relative to the fire... maybe.

    I only just got a Weber Kettle for Christmas and love it. Use any excuse to cook on it now.
     
  17. Stooge007

    Stooge007 Member

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    the main issue with the hood mounted temp probes is that it's measuring the temp at the top of your BBQ, whilst the temp at meat level is often different (by a little or sometimes a lot)

    it's definitely also worth periodically removing and testing the thermometer against boiling/ice water to make sure it's accurate
     
  18. Radley

    Radley Member

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    We're talking about a gas Weber here.

    I've got a chimey. It uses far too much coal for just 1 or 2 steaks. I can cook a killer steak on a gas bbq just fine. It helps if you don't clean the shit out of your grill every time and let the food season the cast iron.
    I mounted a Weber temperature probe on my kettle and as long as you practice then it's easy to manage. The number the temp gauge reads isn't really important, it's more of an indication to whether the bbq is the ideal heat or not.
     
  19. tm_007

    tm_007 Member

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    I end up slow cooking the ribs in the oven for a few hours - then using the BBQ to char them for about 10-15 mins at the end to get the caramelisation. Nice! Best of both worlds.
     
  20. Revenge

    Revenge Member

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    This is the way I generally do ribs, either oven or slow cooker (or sous vide) for several hours at low temp, chill them to firm them back up a bit and then get a bit of crust happening over some charcoal.

    Not as good as a long slow smoke... but easily more consistent and repeatable.
     

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