programming career == bad choice?

Discussion in 'Programming & Software Development' started by MotorAce, Jan 11, 2003.

  1. Shado

    Shado Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    3,580
    Location:
    Brisbane, QLD, Australia
    QUT huh?

    It's ridiculous having lecturers that just read the notes in broken english...

    The only lectures I've shown upto in the last 2 years I've regretted.
     
  2. mark|

    mark| Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    1,701
    Every now and then you'll land an awesome lecturer at uni. Damian Conway comes to mind (monash comp sci pre last year). His lecturers were always full 5 minutes before they started, and anyone who did that course not only knows how to program but also enjoyed their time.

    Then you get the bad ones. We had one guy who was an absolute nut. He kept telling people off for things that should let slide (i.e drinking water in the back row of a 300 seat lecture room on a 35 degree day)
     
  3. VapourTrail

    VapourTrail Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2002
    Messages:
    254
    Location:
    WOW!! My very own walrus!
    Look people if you are like me and absolutely love programming then you havent made the wrong choice. I cant comment on the availability of jobs but let me must say I go to work all day and program, I love it. Id much rather be doing something I love then something I hate for twice the money. Im one of the few ppl in this world who can honestly say I enjoy my work. If you think this would be you then stick at it, once you do eventually get a job you will be set.
     
  4. mortal

    mortal Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2001
    Messages:
    8,393
    Location:
    Sydney
    So what kind of job could you get with a Computer Engineering degree? lol, I'm starting my comp eng degree in a months time, the only reason I chose it was because I love computers, and I heard that 98% of engineers are employed.. :)
     
  5. saba

    saba Evil Vizier

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2001
    Messages:
    2,710
    Location:
    Melbourne
    You would design things like motherboards and CPU's, for example.
     
  6. mortal

    mortal Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2001
    Messages:
    8,393
    Location:
    Sydney
    That wouldnt bother me :D
    But I haven't seen any ad's or anything for "Motherboard/CPU designers"..
     
  7. Bone

    Bone Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2001
    Messages:
    1,112
    Location:
    Sydney
    mmm designing CPU's for amd :D Wonder how 1 could get a job like that?
     
  8. phreeky82

    phreeky82 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2002
    Messages:
    9,679
    Location:
    Qld
    computer systems engineering is more like hardware interfacing, probably a fair bit of assembly coding etc.

    specifically learning a lot of electrical engineering, adding microchips and coding them for interfacing for example with a HDD, parallel port, modem, and the list goes on.

    i dunno about CPUs, but motherboard manufacturers would generally develop all sorts of computer and electrical components, and those starting at the bottom (maybe SOME graduates, more probably those in the industry with a bit of experience) would work on these kinds of products and possibly work their way up. of course, that's just my guess :)

    i started a Computer Science/Computer Systems Engineering degree, but changed to IT because i didn't realise how much Electrical Engineering was involved. never be afraid to change course, but more importantly ensure you'll end up doing what u enjoy. i'm now in my final year :)

    EDIT: typos
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2003
  9. mortal

    mortal Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2001
    Messages:
    8,393
    Location:
    Sydney
    http://www.uow.edu.au/discover/courses/yr2003/cour725.html
    Thats the course I'm doing.
    Some subjects involve: Computer science, maths, physics, electrical engineering, java/c/c++/unix etc, electronics etc. I think in final year you can choose a few of your own which is pretty cool, might go with telecommunications or networking.
     
  10. FlameHead

    FlameHead Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2001
    Messages:
    2,072
    Location:
    Sydney
    Damn, I'm in 2nd year CSE/CS and didn't realise that it ramps into all that electonic stuff. I love programming but only want to move into robots later in life. My end goal by the way is to make androids that can either be slaves and/or infantry replacement. I'd arm them with nun chucks for fun and have them beat the enemy to death. Right now I'd have them on Saddam search & kill mode.
     
  11. Kermalius

    Kermalius Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2002
    Messages:
    870
    Try thinking embeded.

    There are probably more microprocessors siting in the room with you than you'd car to think and they all need somone to design their logic circuits, interfaces, code them up and stamp them for approval etc.

    Of course, thats in a very "pure" sense of computer engineering. With such a degree (assuming you have a little flexibility and enjoy a little variety), you should be able to cover most topics in the EE through SEng spectrum. You may just miss some of the hardcore crap like power electronics (evil), or (some of) software quality/process management/formal analysis & design.

    This is ofcoruse, speculation without having looked up a CEng degree structure for a while. However the general rules hold - You'll learn very little in uni except how to learn and some Elect/Mech/Mangement/Whatever basics. You'll learn more area specific material & methodologies on the job and through experiance.
     
  12. phreeky82

    phreeky82 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2002
    Messages:
    9,679
    Location:
    Qld
    well that was the course at my uni, but every uni is different and their courses differ also

    for me, first yr involved engineering ethics etc, computers and logic (a fair bit of matlab), chemical, electrical, maths, maths, intro to comp sci 1, intro to comp sci 2.

    can't remember exact subject names, but something like those

    from there, second yr had mainly electrical and maths. i know someone in there final year of this double degree, and it has remained like this throughout. after first year i got my course change.
     

Share This Page

Advertisement: