Programming Languages

Discussion in 'Programming & Software Development' started by Infest, Sep 3, 2004.

  1. Roscoe

    Roscoe Member

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    I'm a first time programmer, unless you call batch files and Windows scripts programming, I'm learning C# using two beginner books.

    One of the books is called "C# programming for the absolute beginner" from Premier Dev. Let me just say this book is not for the absolute beginner! The other book is "A true beginner’s guide to programming in C#" from Osborne (I think); This is a real beginner’s guide to C# programming.

    I'm using Visual Studio .Net C# 2003 that I purchased for $175; I thought that was pretty good for the standard version. I'm having fun and it's nice to look at some of our custom in house apps written in .Net and being able to pick through the code a little.

    I’m no where near a "real" programmer yet but I’ve written a few apps such as getting rid of KIXart scripting and moved to a GUI based C# “script” I guess you would say (it looks at the users domain membership and adds resources based on what groups the user is in).

    What I do is take what I learn each night from my C# books and applied it to an application I’m writing. As I learn I add the features to my application. It’s gone from a “Hello World” console screen to accepting input, writing the input to file and reading the file if it exists when starting up (and adds the entries to variables).

    C# looks like it will fit with my System/Network Admin job and might even make me a bit of money on the side down the track when I write applications for fun. But that’s a while away…
     
  2. k0ncept0ne

    k0ncept0ne Member

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    well I'm a bit of a Haskell fan, but more of a Python fan, so your last comment made me happy :)

    I won't try and argue with anyone about Haskell, but I'll just say one thing: why does everyone (and by everyone I mean most people :p) hate Haskell so much? sure it can be difficult to get your head around at first, but once you get used to some new conventions and learnt how to solve problems with it you've expanded your mind, and are a better problem solver as a consequence. Give it a chance, that's my opinion. :)
     
  3. adsta

    adsta Member

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    I can program in C, C++, Java, VB, x86 asm, and the very cool cosmac elf machine code (which I will never use, but it was still fun to learn).
     
  4. deepspring

    deepspring Member

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    When you've only just gotten used to coding in a particular way (ie: OOP), it's a little hard to switch over to somethin like Haskell (no loops or variables!?!?).
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2004
  5. GreenBeret

    GreenBeret Member

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    You'd probably hate Prolog way more than Haskell then...

    I did Haskell in first semester, first year at uni. Easy as piss. Got something like 95 or 97. I still think that it was a complete waste of time though, but apparently the lecturers believe that it's good for academic purpose...
     
  6. deepspring

    deepspring Member

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    Yup Prolog is ugly...

    I'll stick to stuff I can quickly read and understand to some extent (ie: Java, Python, PHP, etc).
     
  7. GreenBeret

    GreenBeret Member

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    I wouldn't say that it's ugly... It's academically beautiful :p but yeah it's not very useful. I hate the fact that you have to rely on linked lists 99% of the time. Very slow for many tasks. Just had to code one long arse AI project in Prolog...
     
  8. sm

    sm Member

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    The first programming I ever did was with Haskell as a 1st year student at Melb Uni. I struggled with it a bit at first but I found it a pretty good language to learn first up.

    Most of the code I'm working on at the moment is C++ with Qt and KDE, and Java for uni work.
     
  9. k0ncept0ne

    k0ncept0ne Member

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    Why is it hard? When you learn a paradigm, do you let it dominate your coding and the way you think? If you've just learnt Java and then have to learn Haskell, learning Java shouldn't really have any impact on how hard Haskell is. Sure you might have more work to do learning both languages, and maybe you use 'hard' meaning there's too much work to do, but just learning Java before switching to Haskell shouldn't make Haskell any harder (unless as I suggested before you've let the object oriented paradigm completely dominate your mind :p).
     
  10. deepspring

    deepspring Member

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    Meh... OOP just makes more sense to me.
     

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