Programming - Where to start?

Discussion in 'Programming & Software Development' started by samsino, Sep 18, 2008.

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  1. samsino

    samsino Member

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    hey guys, recently i've been looking into C++ as i'm thinking of learning a programming language. I've had experience with actionscript within flash MX, but that's about it.

    could anyone recommend a good place to start? - books, internet tutorials, dvds?

    and what program to use?

    thanks for any help you can give me
     
  2. Elyzion

    Elyzion Member

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    Is this as a hobby or do you want a career doing programming?
     
  3. m0zzie

    m0zzie Member

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    as Elyzion asked, you'll need to tell us whether you're looking to do this just for a hobby, or for a career. and if you're looking to make it your career, it will depend what industry you're wanting to go into also.

    if you were looking to take on a career in big business corporations etc, i'd probably suggest learning C#, simply because .NET has such a rapid development process and it has become the industry standard.
    if you were looking at something like game programming, or anything scientific or physics related, then i'd suggest C++ for its power and speed of processing.

    if you want to do it just as a hobby then i guess you could choose almost anything. i started when i was quite young as a hobby, something i'd do after school (instead of homework!), and i started on object pascal (Delphi) which i found relatively easy to pick up. from there i moved onto C++ and then also learned VB a few years later once i was in highschool and doing Software Dev as a subject.

    the choice is yours :)
     
  4. prezident doom

    prezident doom Member

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    Seriously if you are new to it i would pick up a Dummies guide to C++/C#/VB ... etc. The books lay things out in simple terms and will give you a good grounding in the fundamentals of the language. As you read through it complete all of the programming exercises.

    After that pick up a more advanced book on the language and keep going from there.
     
  5. yihfeng

    yihfeng Member

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    The last time I read Java for Dummies (which was years ago), it spent exactly half of the book telling you how great Java is, and the other half showing you websites to download free java applets and then how to embed those applets into your HTML web pages.

    Arguably one of the most useless book ever written!
     
  6. trickma

    trickma Member

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    Click this link: http://www.3dbuzz.com on the menu on the left go to C++ and click on the first "Introductory level" they provide plenty of free videos that a beginner in programming would find incredibly useful without boring the hell out of you.

    Enjoy :thumbup:
     
  7. vtekyo

    vtekyo New Member

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    c++ will make you a stronger programmer but it is the long road no doubt. The price-benefit may not be there. Have a look at Ruby On Rails as well, It is one of the newest and friendly languages, while still being powerful.
     
  8. Elyzion

    Elyzion Member

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    Right after being as useless as Java...

    I've looked at some java books, the syntax is so horrible.

    Such as opening a bracket on the same line as the method like

    public void methodname() {

    }

    BAD BAD BAD!!!! ARG.
     
  9. domlebo

    domlebo Member

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    Python if you're new to functional programming. Spend 1 month on it, and then progress to C# imo.
     
  10. swipe

    swipe (Banned or Deleted)

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    Ruby on Rails is a web-framework built-on top of the Ruby language.
    Python isn't a functional programming language.


    To the op, I'd suggest having a browse around on Wikipedia - have a read about Ruby, Scala, Python, Perl, Java, etc. Alternatively, post something you'd like to make here and see the recommendations flow as to what language/framework, etc to use.
     
  11. domlebo

    domlebo Member

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    Python CAN be used in a functional way, rather then it's usual OO or Procedural form. See http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-prog.html
     
  12. swipe

    swipe (Banned or Deleted)

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    Yes - but it is not a functional programming language. Used in a functional way != functional programming language.
     
  13. Elyzion

    Elyzion Member

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    Glad not everyone here is an idiot.

    Theres nothing worse than people who learn ruby on rails and then whinge cos when they need to develop outside the norm of what the framework does, they cant because they never took the time to learn ruby in the beginning.
     
  14. Landless

    Landless New Member

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    C++ is a pretty big dive into object oriented programming. Its like running with knives.

    If you want to do win32 interfaces, guis and stuff, use C# or VB.net.

    If you want to do web based stuff, try PHP / mySQL is great fun.

    If you want to do hobby level "understanding programming structure", learning about ways to run algorithms and store data, i recommend Java, very similar to C++ and C# without all the nasty stuff. Its bad at GUI's though.


    I personally am a java developer for a living, although i have developed in C++ / C# / PHP and some others before.

    L.
     
  15. Phreeky

    Phreeky Member

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    PHP / mySQL would be good for web, its cheap (free) and pretty widely used

    I am a AS3 man myself ( Flash CS3 / Flex / Air ) so I'm biased towards that ;)
     
  16. stmok

    stmok Member

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    IF you're starting to learn C++, one of the books to get is:
    => C++ Primer Plus (5th Edition, by Stephen Prata)

    The real question is what you want to do with a computer language you're planning to learn? Which platform do you want to specifically code for? (Windows? Linux? BSD? OSX?...It doesn't matter? => Multi-platform). Will this be a hobby or are you planning to turn this into a career?

    To learn C++, you'll need (bare essentials): a text editor and a compiler. Both are typically free.

    If you want an IDE, something like Visual C++ Express Edition, Code::Blocks, etc is all you need. (They're free as well...Just remember to keep in mind of the possible limitations to some of these free products).
     
  17. Punch Bunny

    Punch Bunny Member

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    In Java there's nothing stopping you from using:

    public void methodname()
    {

    }

    I actually learnt C using the syntax style that you don't like, and have always used Java in the manner I just described (which is now how I also use C++). But nothing is stopping you from using either one the other way around, it's just personal preference.

    To the OP: if you want to learn a good language that can easily get you commercial work and also give you some headway into learning the "harder" stuff, I'd recommend both Java and C#. Both have C-style syntax, which means learning C or C++ will be less alienating, but their managed runtime environments are much more forgiving than C/C++. Both also have lots of jobs available to them should you be seeking future work in the industry.

    I'm sure people will argue that some other language is better - and the argument will have merit. However, I doubt too many people can argue about how prolific Java and C# are in the industry, nor can they argue the long-term usefulness and power of C/C++.

    Good luck! Programming is fun, I couldn't imagine using computers without being able to make them dance to your own tune :)

    Edit:
    For books, I quite like:
    C++ How to Program, and
    Beginning Visual C++ (if you will be using C++ under Windows)
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2008
  18. OP
    OP
    samsino

    samsino Member

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    I'm looking at doing it as a hobby, but might pick it up as a career (I'm only in year 10, so I've got some time to think about it).

    I think I'll look into Java and C# then I'll probably progress into C++, thanks for the advice guys

    edit: could anyone recommend some good books for Java programming? also which program should i use?
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2008
  19. prezident doom

    prezident doom Member

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    public void methodname() {

    }

    public void methodname()
    {

    }

    public void methodname() { }


    its all the same
     
  20. Deltoid

    Deltoid Member

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    Don't worry about Java programming for now. I suggest learning C# to start with.

    Why? Because it is very similar to Java (I was taught Java at uni and was able to work out C# from there). C# has a fantastic IDE (Visual Studio) and you can draw GUIs really easy.

    I suggest downloading C# Express (it is a free download from microsoft) then look up a "C# Hello World" tutorial and that will get you started.
     

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