Project Addison

Discussion in 'Modding Worklogs' started by slipperyskip, Aug 29, 2014.

  1. slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    Project goal is to design and build a powerful as possible gaming rig into a small as possible enclosure.

    Note: I place captions below photos.

    [​IMG]
    Start by building a temporary structure to help mock up equipment locations.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    This will be my first use of water cooling even though it is just an AIO unit.



    [​IMG]
    The key to this build is this Mini-ITX sized GTX 760 from MSI.



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Gigabyte has been a sponsor of mine since 2006. This is the WiFi version of their Z97 Mini-ITX gaming board. I chose this over their GA-Z97N-Gaming 5 board because I didn't need the onboard Killer NIC and liked the idea of having dual HDMI instead of just one.



    [​IMG]
    Gigabyte was also gracious enough to provide me with one of Hi Cookie's i7-4770K Intel Engineering Sample CPUs.



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Silverstone has been a sponsor of mine for over ten years.



    [​IMG]
    For this project I'm using the modular cable version of their 450W SFX PSU.



    [​IMG]
    Here it is sitting next to their hard wired version. Modular cables are awesome but for this design so are the fan and power cable connector locations.



    [​IMG]
    Kingston HyperX is a new sponsor. They provided me with this 480GB SSD which will be the system's only drive.



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    They also sent me this 8GB Fury kit rated at 1866MHz.



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    I found an old Silverstone PCIE riser card and thought this setup would demonstrate the size of the video card compared to the MB. I considered using this in a design idea but in the end passed on it.

    [​IMG]

    Thanks for looking.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2014
  2. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    [​IMG]
    Chopped up a bunch of 1/2" thick basswood sticks and glued them up into the matrix. Backing board is 1/16" aircraft grade birch plywood.

    Once after mentioning some Imperial measurements a friend in Europe sent me a link to a world map with the US highlighted. It was suppose to be nations in the world not on the metric system. I told him I thought is was nations who have walked on the moon. :)



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Carved out the openings with a razer knife and sandpaper.



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Glued up some offset spacers for the I/O plate mounting.



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    The thickness of the cases back plate is determined by the mounting tangs of the video card. I also need the thickness to provide extra support because this sucka is heavy.



    [​IMG]
    The project height will be determined by the 8-pin PCIE power connector on the video card. I have a low-profile version in the works. Until then the height of the back plate will remain "crazy tall".



    [​IMG]
    Assembled the components and tested by installing Windows 8.1. Microsoft has been a supporter of mine for the last four years by providing the OS for all projects. Photo can also be captioned "Ten pounds of sh*t to go into a five pound bag".

    Thanks for looking!
     
  3. Acesi7

    Acesi7 Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2009
    Messages:
    2,149
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Looking forward to seeing the new design SS.

    Any reason for the change?
     
  4. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    I try not to give up my design inspiration this early in a project. It is kinda my thing...I like the mystery. My last project (Flightline) I didn't give it up until post #46.

    For the record, this is my tenth project log here at OCAU. :D
     
  5. the3coopers

    the3coopers Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2012
    Messages:
    1,681
    Location:
    Sydney 2151
    The obvious solution is to take the power out the rear side of the PCB, then down over the RAM.

    You can re-use the existing socket and re-solder it on the other side of the PCB. But the PCIe cable would need to be re-wired because the pin assignments would be mirrored - might lead to confusion later.

    Better would be to notch the PCB and rotate the existing socket by 90 degrees so it lies sideways. Would only require custom-extended pins to arch them 180° and into the existing solder points.

    I guess that you could just make up a 90 degree female to male socket adaptor, but that would not be as low profile, nor as neat.
     
  6. Moptimus

    Moptimus Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2011
    Messages:
    1,094
    Location:
    Nambour-by-the-Sea
    Glad to see you back mate, this build looks promising.
     
  7. Sondrix

    Sondrix Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2014
    Messages:
    11
    What's the inspiration for the project name? I ask this because my name is Addison :)
     
  8. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    See update below for reply. :thumbup:

    Thanks mate! It should be alright if I can get it somewhere close to the image in my head.

    That's cool. Any family in Canada?

    ************************************

    [​IMG]
    Low-profile graphics card power connector will help keep down the overall height of the enclosure. I calculate about 10mm savings which translates to approximately .6 liters in my design.



    [​IMG]
    This is the cleat that will eventually hold the radiator mounting plate to the case. It needs to be removable so I'm using threaded wood inserts. First drill out pilot holes.



    [​IMG]
    An Allen wrench is used to set the insert into place.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    This is the radiator mounting plate with holes located for the four radiator mounts and two slots cut for the hoses. Opening for air flow is on the to-do list. This is 6-ply 1/8 inch aircraft grade birch plywood.



    [​IMG]
    Mounting the cleat using 8-32 screws.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    There will be an identical cleat mounted to the other end of the radiator plate. The cleats will be attached to the interior of the case so as to span the distance front to back.


    Thanks for looking.
     
  9. sjp770

    sjp770 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2009
    Messages:
    1,717
    Location:
    Sticks, NSW
    Another nice build :) Do you have a design for the outside in mind?
     
  10. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    Yes but I'm keeping it to myself for now.

    *****************************************

    [​IMG]
    Cut out the radiator opening and trimmed the plate length to size.



    [​IMG]
    I had to add some material for the video card mount in order to allow adequate depth for the wood insert. I also had to widen the face on one side in order to center the radiator fan (and opening).

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Wood insert and screw for the video card mount. I'll install another one next to it after adding more material to the area. I always use both screws in a two slot video card although some say that is overkill.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    The front plate is identical to the back plate dimension-wise. Same 1/16" birch plywood with 1/2" reinforcements.



    [​IMG]
    Here the two are back to back.



    [​IMG]
    Here they are stacked.



    [​IMG]
    Both face plates have the same 1/8" ledge to help align and fit them to the bottom plate.



    [​IMG]
    Something like this. The height will be trimmed down significantly as soon as I get comfortable with what it should be. Sits nicely until the wind blows.



    [​IMG]
    The radiator plate tossed on top. It will bridge the front and back plates eventually. I'm experimenting with 15mm thick radiator fans instead of the stock 25mm fans and that could greatly alter the radiator plate position.

    Important to note here that all of this is an internal structure that won't be seen when finished. There is a completely separate candy-coated outer shell that will slide down over the top of this inner structure.

    Thanks for looking!
     
  11. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    [​IMG]
    Attached the cleat to the front panel.



    [​IMG]
    Showing the embedded screw inserts.



    [​IMG]
    Attached the cleat to the back panel.



    [​IMG]
    Radiator mounting panel with attachment hardware ready to go.



    [​IMG]
    Most of the scribbling is just random thoughts from some previous project. I tend to write on wood instead of paper.



    [​IMG]
    Front and back panels bridged by the radiator mount.



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Added in the bottom panel. This will be glued together eventually but I still have significant work to do on the individual panels so this is just a photo op.




    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Framed in the PSU so it can only move one way...upward.



    [​IMG]
    Bought this mesh desk set at OfficeMax for cheap.



    [​IMG]
    Loads of high quality mesh that will take me years to use. Some brands are better than others. I like this variety because it is a tighter mesh.



    [​IMG]
    Finally after all these years I sprung for a crimper. This project hinges on reducing the mass of cables.



    [​IMG]
    Over the years I have amassed a virtual mountain of spare modular cables of all varieties. I feel comfortable that I can experiment and screw up on a grand scale without too much consequence.



    [​IMG]
    First up is the 12V EPS 4+4 cable. My board doesn't need the +4 so half of the cables disappear before it gets shortened. Before and after photo.



    [​IMG]
    Next up is the PCIE cable. Instead of the 6+2 connector nonsense I'm going with exactly what I need...8-pin. Before and after. Note: I'm not concerned with fancy sleeving or anything right now. I'm only concerned with proper length and whether it actually works or not. I assumed up front that I'll be making each cable twice before all the dust clears.



    [​IMG]
    SATA cable was a piece of cake because I have done them before. Before and after photo.



    [​IMG]
    I haven't tackled the 24-pin ATX cable yet because of a mystery. The cable included in the new power supply has an electronic component heat-shrinked into the cable bundle. I did a little research but came up with nothing.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    My best guess is it has something to do with backfitting PSUs with "Haswell compatibility" by using a special cable set. Does anyone know anything about this?

    Thanks for looking.
     
  12. Rezin

    Rezin Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2002
    Messages:
    9,488
    If it were anyone else I'd say.. be careful with those modular cables, and their custom wiring. But I don't really have to. I definitely do not have to.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    I have never crimped ATX connectors before and didn't want to learn on my hard-wired PSU. I've got enough spare modular cables to learn how to do it drunk.

    I think I'm sufficiently paranoid enough to get through this OK. I map out my own diagram and trace each wire hole to hole at least twice. I've read the horror stories too. :wired:
     
  14. sjp770

    sjp770 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2009
    Messages:
    1,717
    Location:
    Sticks, NSW
    Looks like a capacitor to smooth voltage? Cut that heat shrink off and have a look. Usually that trick is to make up for a poorly made PSU.
     
  15. Acesi7

    Acesi7 Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2009
    Messages:
    2,149
    Location:
    Melbourne
    +1, that's precisely what this is. Real pain in the neck...

    I have read about people removing them without too many headaches, but it does decrease the quality of delivered power, so I wouldn't recommend it. :tired:

    Possible to use a better quality PSU?
     
  16. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    It is a Gold rated 450W modular SFX from Silverstone. AFAIK it is the only one sold by anybody. I have the wired Silverstone 450W SFX as well but it is rated Bronze. They just came out with a 600W model.

    I haven't read any negative reviews or feedback other than cables being too short.
     
  17. Acesi7

    Acesi7 Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2009
    Messages:
    2,149
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I had a ST1500w from Silverstone which did the same thing. Silverstone appear to use caps on their cables pretty frequently regardless on line or model.

    Given that the cables will be hidden, might pay to shorten the PSU but keep the caps attached. Will that be a workable solution?
     
  18. Anteros

    Anteros Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    697
    Location:
    Penrith
    I thought Silverstone had Caps on their PCI-E cables too, but I can't see them in your photos. I was certain mine has them. It's what stopped me from sleeving mine.
     
  19. OP
    OP
    slipperyskip

    slipperyskip Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    520
    Location:
    Florida
    I have two other 24-pin ATX cables from other Silverstone models both without caps. My gameplan of being able to butcher a few without consequence could be in trouble if I have to use a "capped" version. Silverstone offered to send me one of their new slim cable sets to use with this model PSU. I wonder if they are capped as well?

    I have around 10 Silverstone PCI-E cables. None of them have caps.

    ***********************************

    I probably need to contact Silverstone about all this especially since there have been some disparaging remarks about their products. Something is still missing here.
     
  20. BlueRaven

    BlueRaven Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2010
    Messages:
    4,191
    Location:
    Sydney
    Given the application across a 3.3V line and the shape under the heatshrink, it'll just be a fairly-low-value axial electrolytic to smooth any transients which might upset the board when heavily OC'd.

    Not hard to find one to replace it if you do decide to attack it while drunk and mess it all up. :p
    At worst it will be a low-ESR type, which are still pretty easy to find these days.

    Moot point I guess, if the nice folks at SilverStone are offering to send you a cable set. :thumbup: (EDIT: Ah, but you'll still need to shorten it, right...)
    Interested to hear what they have to say about it, as it's the first time I've seen a 24-pin ATX with a smoothing cap built in... would be nice if someone could confirm/deny my assumptions re. stability while overclocking.
    Who knows, maybe they are ahead of the game here and we'll soon start to see other manufacturers copying the idea. Wouldn't be the first time...

    Good progress re. the project anyway mate, looking forward to seeing more. :D
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2014

Share This Page