[PROJECT] Ariston LBF51 X AUS.R Dishwasher Arduino conversion

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by /invariance\, Jan 3, 2015.

  1. /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    808
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Went to use our dishwasher one evening and it was absolutely dead.

    After some investigation found the main controller board was dead. In actual fact there is a small daughter board switchmode psu with blown components on it. As there are a number of 12v relays on the controller board, reason would dictate that the psu was 12v, hence I soldered up a 12v reg plugpack but it didn't work; there was life but it was giving some error code with the leds which I couldn't find on the web.

    This is the unit (Ariston also known as Hotpoint and Indesit):

    Click to view full size!


    The offending part was a psu daughterboard on the main controller board (which has already been removed in the below photo: the slots top centre). This part is about $280, then if I interpreted the information correctly, a smart card reader ($300) and a smart card are required to program the controller board, so I am pretty much at the cost of a new dishwasher.

    Click to view full size!

    PN 1661245, EV 2270320 #15 Module DEA 602 Synchronous

    Here is a link to one very similar, also blown: http://monitor.net.ru/forum/indesit-iwsb-5085-info-381720.html

    Besides the calcification inside the dishwasher, the unit otherwise looks new and the really annoying thing is we are still paying it off. Hence why I am going to attempt to create a new controller with an Arduino.


    I will start this off with investigating the components to gain some understanding of them and to work out how many inputs/outputs, etc.
     
  2. maddhatter

    maddhatter Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    4,798
    Location:
    Mackay, QLD.
    I have no experience with dishwashers, I'd assume your looking at a PTC or NTC thermistor, a heater output, solenoid actuation for the water inlet and a pump to circulate the water / drain the water. Maybe a water level sensor / switch too?

    Should be fairly easily accomplished with an Arduino, relay board, a few resistors and a bit of code.

    Good luck, subscribed :thumbup:
     
  3. kombiman

    kombiman Dis-Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2006
    Messages:
    11,477
    Location:
    viva brisvegas
    Be keen to see how you go :thumbup:
     
  4. OP
    OP
    /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    808
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Thanks guys, I'll be interested to see too :p

    There doesn't appear to be many documented conversions, so I thought the purpose of posting this project could be twofold:
    1) add to the knowledgebase, and
    2) make me see it through to the end and I don't go "f*$k it!" half way.
     
  5. HSV_Enigma

    HSV_Enigma Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2003
    Messages:
    434
    Location:
    Adelaide
  6. HeXa

    HeXa Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2001
    Messages:
    10,216
    Location:
    Canberra, ACT
  7. OP
    OP
    /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    808
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Sources and Resources

    I had found neonsquirts conversion also but mine won't be anywhere near as 'polished' with an lcd display, although I would like to build in a child lock and a delayed start so the washing will be finished closer to when we get up in the morning.

    I have mainly been using Big Warehouse Spares for the parts info, but there is also Ariston itself.

    Below are the exploded diagrams which I will be referencing throughout:

    EV2270140

    Click to view full size!

    http://spares.bigwarehouse.com.au/images/files/21505_29d7f75bc34575d7d356fdac9db07c11.pdf

    EV2270210

    Click to view full size!

    http://spares.bigwarehouse.com.au/images/files/21506_20e06164ba6853cdc092d9c18a4c77cc.pdf

    EV2270320

    Click to view full size!

    http://spares.bigwarehouse.com.au/images/files/21504_ff793823f2d324f6e41008eb42a39931.pdf

    Legend: PN = manufacturer part number, EV = exploded view diagram (bottom right corner), # = the exploded view reference number.

    Water comes in via the Inlet Valve (240v solenoid)[PN 1661147, EV 2270210 #037], into the Air Break + Turbine [PN 1661090, EV 2270210 #033] in which is housed a flow sensor (2 wire n/o?) which might be the Turbine. I expect the Turbine is there to ensure the tap is open and prevent the Inlet Valve from burning out.


    Click to view full size!

    PN 1661147, EV 2270210 #037 Electrovalve 1E 1U


    Click to view full size!

    PN 1661090, EV 2270210 #033 Air Break + Turbine


    Click to view full size!

    Turbine

    The water flows past the Turbine (which appears to use a reed switch) up through the right hand side of the Air Break to the hook at the top, then going by the rust marks, it loops back on itself and down to a solenoid below.

    Going by some of the videos online, water is supposed to enter the washing compartment via that large opening in the Air Break but the rust mark doesn't exactly indicate such.


    Looks like I will have to move it near a tap and hook up some power.


    Now that sounds like fun: water and 240v.

    Thinking about this "Air Break", I guess it is to allow for expansion and contraction of the air inside the dishwasher as it heats up, so it doesn't force past the seals.

    That will do me for the moment....
     
  8. OP
    OP
    /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    808
    Location:
    Brisbane
    I have a question I hope someone (or everyone) can help me with.

    I am thinking that there must be some sort of feedback for water temperature as it wouldn't be timer based for heating, because the variance in the cold water temperature will effect the final temp.

    The only device that I can't account for is this on the side of the sump:

    Click to view full size!

    Apologies for not checking the picture and noticing that the camera focused on the cable instead of the device before uploading.

    Here is the device removed from the sump mounting point:

    Click to view full size!


    Disassembled, showing the possible sensor:

    Click to view full size!


    Not much to go by is there?

    Here is the supporting circuitry:

    Click to view full size!


    The 'sensor' has a resistance of 16k @ 22degC and there is no voltage.
    Initially I thought it could be using a P-N junction so I performed a diode test which gave .83v in one direction and .53 in the opposite direction but it is in situ so it is probably reading the supporting circuit.

    So, any ideas anyone????
     
  9. HSV_Enigma

    HSV_Enigma Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2003
    Messages:
    434
    Location:
    Adelaide
    Probably a thermister, try measuring the resistance while heating it gently
     
  10. HeXa

    HeXa Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2001
    Messages:
    10,216
    Location:
    Canberra, ACT
    and unplug it first......
     
  11. OP
    OP
    /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    808
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Thanks, I'll desolder it from the board and warm it between my fingers, maybe even put it in the fridge first for a greater delta.
     
  12. HeXa

    HeXa Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2001
    Messages:
    10,216
    Location:
    Canberra, ACT
    why would you desolder it? :confused:

    just unplug it from the PCB.....
     
  13. OP
    OP
    /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    808
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Everything else is plugged in except that. :confused::confused:

    It's just a strain relief on the pcb. :mad:


    EDIT:
    So, put it in the fridge and when I pulled it out and measured the resistance it dropped from around 50k to 36k.
    Put my finger on it, then removed, and it went from 34k back up to the 36k.

    Appears to be an NTC Thermistor, and I have only played with PTC thermistors for speaker protection consequently didn't think of one for temp sensing.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2015
  14. OP
    OP
    /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    808
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Got a feelin' in me waters

    The dishwasher is under the house, so I moved it to the laundry section (think of a 1960's 2 story on a big slab of concrete and the walls are 6" x 1" slats of timber with a 2" gap between each, between the concrete poles).

    With the mozzie plague at the moment, have to bathe in mozzie repellant before going downstairs. :mad::mad::mad::mad: (Around our house at least).

    Hooked up the water, poked the drain out the side of the house and used a terminal strip to do some testing.

    Found that the water does flow up and around through the "hook" in the Air Break and back down to the solenoid on the Water Softener [PN 1661088, EV 2270210 #031].

    Click to view full size!

    No water flows out of the side vent in the Air Break

    When the solenoid is active the water flows through the Water Softener and fills via the sump.

    When the solenoid is inactive (no power applied) the water flows straight into the sump.

    So when it fills for a wash, it will flow through the Water Softener (maybe for the whole fill), and on prewash/rinse it will bypass the salt tank.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2015
  15. kombiman

    kombiman Dis-Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2006
    Messages:
    11,477
    Location:
    viva brisvegas
    Lol gotta love the Queenslander. We have so many mozzies I'e put a weight vest on the pug so they don't carry him away... I've not seen them this bad for about 15 years! To make you jealous I have after much effort, faffing about and redoing many previous bodges lined our laundry to make it swish!



    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2015
  16. OP
    OP
    /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    808
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Well all I can say is

    [​IMG]
     
  17. OP
    OP
    /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    808
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Wow, made it to the News feed. Pressure's on to finish it now. :lol:

    OK, so I think I have most of the main components under the dishwasher sorted with the I/O requirements:

    • Inlet Valve - 240Vac - digital o/p via relay
    • Water Softener solenoid - 240Vac - digital o/p via relay
    • Main Pump - 240Vac - digital o/p via relay (future option to go SCR and control speed)
    • Heating Element - 240Vac - digital o/p via relay
    • Drain Pump - 240Vac - digital o/p via relay


    • Turbine - n/o mag reed - digital i/p
    • NTC Thermistor - guessing 40k @20*C - analogue i/p
    • Pressure Switch - n/o - digital i/p
    • Float Overflow Unit - n/c - digital i/p
    • Salt level sensor - haven't yet investigated as I'm sure if I will use it yet
    Making 4 digital outputs and for the inputs 3 digital (with an optional 4th), 1 analogue.

    I have been casting my attention to the 'Select Wash Cycle Knob' up on the control panel and it is an Alps variable resistor of a taper I (not surprisingly) have not come across.
    At 0deg (or 360deg) the resistance is about 97k, turning it clockwise few deg and it drops to ~60R.
    As it is rotated clockwise to 180deg the resistance rises (what appears to be) linearly to 2k8.
    Turning from 180deg to ~358deg the resistance falls to about 600R.

    As yet I haven't found anything on it with Google but the only other marking on it is '036'. Probably not really important as the mechanism sets the pot to specific positions so the resistances will be known and just need to be buffered and fed to 1 analogue input on the Arduino.

    I'm at work at the moment, so I will have to tease you with the story until I can get some pics up.

    Edit 22/01: Some more testing and some lovely pics.

    This is the Control Panel (which is referred to as the Console [PN 1661226, EV 2270320 #6])

    Click to view full size!


    And the cycle selector pcb which is part of the Interface With Knob [PN

    1661194 EV2270320 #7]

    Click to view full size!



    A little picture I made up of the resistances at the various positions.

    Click to view full size!


    I am relieved that it is only a pot as I was fearing it to be an encoder/bcd/'something like that' switch.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2015
  18. OP
    OP
    /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    808
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Finally got around to ordering and receiving the major components of this project; the arduino and relay card.


    Click to view full size!


    I have been occasionally attempting a bit of coding for it, but if I wasn't spending so much time washing up I would be able to do more :lol:

    I have been a bit distracted going through a collection of old laptops that I would like to shift instead of doing what i should be.
    Also the last time I did any programming was back in '93, so it's not something that I can just bang out.
    Well, time to stop making excuses and get back into this......
     
  19. rainwulf

    rainwulf Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2002
    Messages:
    4,213
    Location:
    bris.qld.aus
    Is that relay card daisy chainable?

    edit: crap its not. its not even "smart" and just replicates the inputs.
    I need to control at least 50 outputs.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2015
  20. OP
    OP
    /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    808
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Yes Rainwulf, a nice and basic optoisolated relay card.
    (Just like me) :)

    Without thinking about it too much, would using a matrix work? Like the reverse of a keyboard? Or a demux? Never used or looked at one though.
    Just some random ideas.


    Put my other brain cell to work and realised how much that wouldn't work.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2015

Share This Page