RAM... 20 years gone and 20 years from now

Discussion in 'Memory' started by grim72, Oct 12, 2017.

  1. BurningFeetMan

    BurningFeetMan Member

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    Got a link handy? Sounds very interesting!
     
  2. ^catalyst

    ^catalyst Member

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    breno and MusTangAu like this.
  3. flu!d

    flu!d Ubuntu Mate 16.04 LTS

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    I remember buying one of those for my A500 in the day. Cost me a fortune, my A500 always used to suffer from way more Guru Meditations than one would deem acceptable. It wasn't until my mates A500 died that he gave me his ram expansion and I decided to chuck it into my A500 to see how it went only to find that the Guru's had all but disappeared! My $300.00 ram expansion was faulty from new.

    The best thing about the ram expansion I got off my mate was that it used a socketed lithium coin battery, when I dug my A500 out of the garden shed after 15 years the memory expansion was in perfect nick! Popped a new battery in there and it runs in my A500 to this day.
     
  4. hawpinghaxbag

    hawpinghaxbag Member

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    Since DDR 1st came in, true latency for generic ram has been about the same, DDR1 333mhz cl2.5 = 15ns , ddr4 2133mhz cl15 = 14ns
     
  5. Ratzz

    Ratzz Member

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    IMHO in ten years time, there will be motherboards with multiple TB superfast 'drives' as part of the board, with some of it used as non volatile ram. Something like NVME drives, which are already approaching RAM speeds but cant compete on latency, but much higher capacity, much faster, insane latency, smaller and soldered. You'll see DIMM slots disappear altogether, and vastly more real estate for other, as yet uninvented goodies... or smaller boards.

    The other alternative might be new CPU's with multi TB L2 or L3 cache, again rendering DIMMs obsolete.

    Its hard to imagine just what we'll be using, the speed with which tech advances, but I don't believe RAM will exist as such, at least on high end gear, in ten years time.
     
  6. breno

    breno Member

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    20 years ago, what was I? 12. Yes, I remember glorying in our upgrade to a Pentium so I could run Mechwarrior 2 Pentium Edition.
     
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  7. adamsleath

    adamsleath Member

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    it wont matter. in 20 years the temperature in summer will be 45+ degrees in most capital cities of australia..:lol:

    and the limits of silicon will be exhausted...or just stuck; there will be something else. assuming there isnt some form of catastrophe involving sentient killer robots. and broken airconditioners. ..and runaway autonomous vehikkles.:D

    8086 crap..or x86 or x64 whatever u call it, will be left in the dust....of which there will be more.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2017
  8. ipv6ready

    ipv6ready Member

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    In 20 years there won’t be ram. Just data and compute. Ie storage will be so fast there won’t be a need for intermediary thing called ram.
     
  9. zero_velocity

    zero_velocity Member

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    While I tend to somewhat agree with this, I am a little torn as I would believe that as bulk storage speeds increase, processing power/speed and its associated memory would also increase.

    There would definitely be applications suited to remove discrete memory completely, typically in the SFF, ultra portable, consumer space, I would find it hard to believe that large scale datacentre, number crunching applications would be able to give the mickey up so quickly.

    There's also the problem that with whatever tech is used (assuming SSD technology) there (currently) are/could be limited writes available to the NAND that would prevent the removal of volatile, conventional RAM.

    TL;DR, in 20 years time, bulk storage speeds will dramatically increase, but so should volatile memory / CPU power, which may prevent widespread adoption for this kind of tech.

    Edit: I can also see a huge problem, if the OS doesn't allocate a fixed amount of solid state memory to dedicated RAM. Think of the case where old mate loads up his laptop with movies, games, music etc, and reduces his capability to actually play them outside of the requirements of the OS.

    I doubt any operating system will be able to forecast past its own minimum requirements and reserve memory for applications such as games, CAD, PS etc...
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2017
  10. ^catalyst

    ^catalyst Member

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    Yep.

    Nup. That problem already exists and is dealt with in the computer you're currently using.
     
  11. Doc-of-FC

    Doc-of-FC Member

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    memristors, ions instead of electrons and silicon photonics.

    personal devices will simply be compute nodes with limited storage for offline use, similar to how things are today although amped to the point where 100TB will fit in your pocket.
     

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