Real Ethernet over Power (EoP) speeds?

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by theSeekerr, Aug 11, 2020.

  1. caspian

    caspian Member

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    I would not be writing off EoP without trialling, but as you've isolated the wifi performance issue to the Chromecast hardware, then putting in a local AP sounds like a solution.

    WDS is not something I recommend based on personal experience. I found it fragile and very hardware-specific to get going.
     
  2. power

    power Member

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    has it got a decent length HDMI cable, maybe it's in a deadspot?
     
  3. OP
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    theSeekerr

    theSeekerr Member

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    Yeah, I ran it for 5 years in previous rentals before splitting up the pair of APs recently...worked great when it was working, but only dark rituals would get both ends talking again after a blackout.
     
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  4. caspian

    caspian Member

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    I'm aware of the rituals required to communicate with the dimension where the deities that control WDS live, but with current COVID restrictions it can be hard to locate the right species of goat.

    these are $78 and should be Homeplug AV2, but I am guessing not the MIMO variant due to the rated bandwidth. if they do a quarter of their claimed speed they meet your bandwidth requirements.

    https://www.officeworks.com.au/shop...ine-adaptor-starter-kit-tl-pa411kit-tptlpa411
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2020
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  5. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    Coax is also an attractive option if it's available as impedance is usually more consistent. I'm guessing it's not applicable in this case, but I think worth mentioning for completeness. Latest gen MOCA devices spec 2.5gbps aggregate with 2ghz compliant wire, TDMA and OFDM so speeds don't degrade as devices are added to the net.
     
  6. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    Except no one sells them off the shelf here in Australia.

    They aren't A-ticked.

    Twisted pair (Cat5e and above) is more prevalent as a better option.. and or has been used for phone cabling and if people are lucky it has been at least run in the daisy chained way. Which can be altered for data use.

    And even if one would contemplate running Co-ax as a alternative why would you bother??
     
  7. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    You wouldn't, at least not for data cabling. I'm not sure how prevalent coax is in Aus, but it's pretty common legacy hardware in this neck of the woods. If using coax would mean opening up walls, obviously it doesn't make sense. I'm only suggesting it as an option if you can use existing coax to form the bridge.
     
  8. BuuBox

    BuuBox Member

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    I use Netcomm EoP adaptors in a similar scenario where running ethernet is a pain. Allegedly rated for 500Mb but is more like 50Mb. Reliable though.

    Useless anecdote aside, still worth a try if you buy from somewhere with a generous returns policy. :)
     
  9. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    It isn't really... due to the only in recent years of Foxtel and the like.. in terms when compared with its prevalence in North America
     
  10. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    I wonder how much is due to regulation. LV wiring like coax, telco, bell wire, audio, and so forth doesn't need to be pulled by an electrician in NA.
     
  11. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    Probably most of it...
     
  12. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    On the plus side, you may not see so many rats nests of crufted up comms cabling shoved into ceiling and wall spaces.
     
  13. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    If you plan on being in the place a few years ask permission of the landlord and get a cable installed properly. they're unlikely to kick in for the cost (doesn't add any value to the property), but shouldn't mind letting you get it done professionally. i.e. being professionally done by a licensed cabler doesn't affect their insurance, and it should be done in an aesthetically pleasing way.

    nothing like a proper cabled connection for reliability, speed, and latency.
     
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  14. Mace

    Mace Member

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    theSeekerr

    theSeekerr Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions everyone.

    To be honest it seems this thread was premature - my Chromecast Ultra is actually working just fine on WiFi, it's Disney Plus that's trash. Streaming from my own server / netflix / youtube are fine, I'm getting perfectly OK speeds, but D+ buffers even on 1080p material. I'll just work with the WiFi for now.
     
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  16. the_antipop

    the_antipop Member

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    Hey theSeekerr - I'm in the same predicament, but rather that renting, I'm in a house that has limited roof cavities (raised ceilings for sky lights), plus it's been extended, so some internal walls are brick. Therefore, according to a cabler and electrician, getting data points where I wanted them would be an expensive job.

    So, I went the powerline adapter route. So far it's okay. I'm getting about 75-80mbps down, and 35mbps up on my 100/40 ABB plan. As a comparison, my server (which is hardwired to the router - which is in my main bedroom cupboard, which is where the NBN NTD is [don't ask...]) is getting 108mbps down, 38mbps up.
    It's not terrible, but there is some degradation in performance. I'm leaning toward switching to Wifi 6 - that definitely feels like the future. I think I'll keep my plex server hardwired in, but move all my TVs, PS4(5) and PC to Wifi6.
     
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  17. callan

    callan Member

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    I've tried EoP at 3 locations. At TWO of them it was unusable, but here I got a solid 110mbit connection. VERY occasionally there would be a momentary glitch, but it was quite usable to connect our den/computer room to the Internet. As others have said, success is entirely dependent on location, and circuit specifics.The units I used were a pair of Netcomm 600mbit devices.
    If you're going to try it, buy the EoP devices from somewhere like OfficeWorks, as they have an excellent return policy. Just be courteous to the next guy, keep all the packaging and return it in good order if it's not going to work for you.

    Eventually I had the house professionally wired with cat6 to a comms cabinet, and that was absolutely money well spent. The network has been absolutely rock-solid ever since.

    There is one last suggestion. Some plugin WiFi repeaters (but not all!) have an Ethernet port. You can use these then as Access points - run an Ethernet cable part-way to the destination, then just have one of these sitting close to where you need it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2020
  18. Butcher9_9

    Butcher9_9 Member

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    Sorry if this has already been said but if the WIfi in that spot is good (for some devices) , you could still and AP there in bridge mode and then connect that to a switch to which all of the devices connect.
    The AP should have better signal straight ect than whatever shitty antennas are in a chrome cast.
     
  19. OP
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    theSeekerr

    theSeekerr Member

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    Yeah, that digression exists in the middle of this thread somewhere.

    As I said a few posts up, I was mistaken about the issue I was experiencing - it was down to a new streaming service that happened to be the one I was using most frequently right after I moved, the WiFi is good enough.
     
  20. callan

    callan Member

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    Probably won't work. Most "bridges" sold in the retail space aren't - they work on the wrong layer of the OSI model (or at least that's my bitter experience).
    REAL bridges work at layer 2, maintaining MAC tables of the devices at each end and spoofing the MAC address of the originating packet all the way through.
    Most wireless "Bridges" sold are little-more than a client/AP pair, and the client NATs the devices (Layer 3) it's connecting to, which means no broadcast traffic will make it through to the Chromecast.


    The Chromecast won't be discoverable to your Android devices.

    Callan
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2020

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