Repair Dilemma

Discussion in 'Portable & Small Form Factor' started by bigheadache, Feb 6, 2015.

  1. bigheadache

    bigheadache Member

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    So my Alienware M14x R2 needs a new motherboard (out of warranty). it's going to cost $600-$700 for a new mobo to be installed. if I look on ebay, refurbed mobos are still $500+.

    Basic Specs:
    Intel i7-3610QM, 8gb RAM, 64gb mSATA SSD, 1tb HD, Nvidia GT 650M, 1600x900 screen, Blu-Ray drive.


    So my dillemma is:

    1. Pay the money and get it fixed
    OR
    2. Just pack it and buy a new laptop as $800-$1200 laptops are much better now.

    I've been told to do option 2, but honestly when I was at MLN, alot of the cheaper laptops, even if they had good specs, looked poorly made and you really had to pay $2k+ to get a decently put together unit.

    Now I use my desktop 80% of the time, and my laptop 20% of the time, but i'd still like to have a decent laptop.

    opinions?
     
  2. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    I don't think it's old enough to ditch and I don't think you'd get another laptop with those specs for 500/600. You could throw extra money to get new/"better" and that one might break in the same timeframe so you won't be "buying yourself out of trouble". If it's otherwise good to use, I'd keep it and have it fixed. (but I'd also be asking questions as to why it's packed up)
     
  3. Euphoreia

    Euphoreia Member

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    It's called Statuatory Warranty. You are 100% entitled to get that repaired under warranty.

    http://www.consumerlaw.gov.au/content/the_acl/downloads/consumer_guarantees_guide.pdf

    IT DOESN'T MATTER IF THEY STATE YOU ONLY GET 12 MONTHS WARRANTY

    " The consumer guarantees provide rights that exist despite anything the supplier or manufacturer may say or do."

    Long story short, if you paid $2500 for a laptop, and it's died in under 24 months, you have every right to force them to repair it (Pending it's nothing you've done).

    I mean shit, any reasonable person would expect at least 3 years out of that laptop, assuming it's been treated well. This is what Australian Law goes by, and it doesn't matter AT ALL what Dell say, they're bound by legal obligations. Use them.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2015
  4. mr626

    mr626 Member

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    Basically, what Euphoreia said. I've dealt with Dell in a similar circumstance (also with an Alienware laptop) and they repaired it.

    Don't let them fob you off- ask to speak to someone else if that is what is happening.
     
  5. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    I didn't know the age of it, but you are absolutely right - that's what I was referring to when I said I'd be asking questions as to why it's packed up. Even if it is older than 24 months, if the motherboard failed due to a defect then you'd still be able to ask for/require repair under the statutory warranty.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    bigheadache

    bigheadache Member

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    Ok thanks for the opinions. I'll give it a whirl and see what they say.

    Just for the record, this was a $2k machine that I bought as a factory refurb from the Dell outlet (Oct 2012) for $1k, which I got salary sacrificed so it only costed me $550 IIRC. Hence the initial hesistance to spend more on the repair than I did for the machine.
     
  7. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    hmmm, well you can only ask and they can only say "no", no harm in asking. They might say that you took the risk on a refurb, but it's still not a reasonable lifespan for a laptop IMO, refurbed or not. I'm still tapping away on my "ancient" HP.
     
  8. Kelvin

    Kelvin Member

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    Hmm I got Dell to repair my five year old Inspiron 9400 under statutory warranty at the five year mark for the nvidia issue.. With a single but firm phone call

    However as a refurb... Your legal rights may be significantly watered down as you paid a significant discount for something that is secondhand and consequently a likely shorter lifespan.

    Still it never hurts to ask and be firm about your rights... It may pay off..

    With my 9400,
    They claimed the machine was too old and they didn't have parts for it any more... Under Australian law, they need to stock parts for a reasonable time... I then told them I would be happy for a full refund instead... They miraculously found the part needed and fixed it in under a week....
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2015
  9. Grom Hellscream

    Grom Hellscream Member

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    Given it's close to 3 years old it could be argued that it's close to its "reasonable lifetime" being that IT gear seems to have a shorter lifespan than other goods.

    While you might be able to have a go at having it repaired, I do find all the muppets who automatically assume "IT MUST BE REPAIRED OMG STAT WARRANTY" to be rather funny. It must pass the "a reasonable person would expect it to last xx time" test and with IT gear it's really hard to qualify given so many people churn gear over every couple of years. Stuff like how much you paid for the product and how much useful life you've had out of it do come into it when a ruling is made by fair trading too - so yes you might have less of a leg to stand on when buying a cheap repaired (i.e. used) product.

    It could be argued that 3 years is reasonable (that's the ATO's definition for useful life on IT gear) but after that it's a bit 50/50 I reckon.
     

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