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Retro consoles on CRT Television: Exactly which brand/model?

Discussion in 'Retro & Arcade' started by layzee, Nov 3, 2012.

?

My "retro" console (the ones I have fond childhood memories of) was: (guess my age)

  1. Pre-Nintendo era (e.g. I'm approaching my death bed)

    27.5%
  2. Nintendo NES / Sega Master System era

    21.3%
  3. Nintendo SNES / Sega Mega Drive era

    27.5%
  4. Nintendo 64 / Sony PlayStation 1 / Sega Saturn era

    16.3%
  5. Nintendo GameCube / Sony PlayStation 2 / Sega Dreamcast / Microsoft Xbox era

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  6. Nintendo Wii / Sony PlayStation 3 / Microsoft Xbox 360 era (i.e. I came out of a vagina not too long

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. Nintendo Puu / Sony PlayStation 4 / Microsoft Xbox 1080 era (i.e. I'm still in the fetus/semen/super

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  8. PC era (e.g. to me, the concept of time is just a blur with no defining lines)

    6.3%
  9. I don't play video games at all (e.g. I prefer more mature activities like achieving the dead-drunk

    1.3%
  1. layzee

    layzee Member

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    Based on my readings, I have decided that properly connecting retro consoles to modern LCD/Plasma/LED televisions is too much trouble (e.g. I don't have the technical capability to install RGB on retro consoles, etc). The easier option is to simply hook up retro consoles to what they are meant to be connected to: fat CRTs.

    I would like a single big CRT to do the job. But which brand and which model? There are two important factors determining suitability of retro console connectage:

    1. Types of video ports available
    2. Number of video ports available
    3. Location of video ports (front, rear, side)
    4. Size of screen

    To make sure everyone is on the same page, here's a quick refresher on common video port types:

    RCA: Red/white/yellow. The most common video type for retro consoles. Also the worst quality, or the second worst if you include the even older "antenna" type connection.
    S-Video: Good quality, but the availability is rarer in both consoles and TVs.
    Component: Even better than S-Video.
    HDMI: Best video quality currently available.

    And here's a quick summary of the rarer and weirder video port types. For all intents and purposes, these are mostly irrelevant but are presented here for posterity.

    SCART: Mostly for Europeans.
    D-Terminal: Mostly for Japanese.
    VGA: Mostly for computer monitors.
    RGB: Possibly the best quality for retro consoles, as well as maximising compatibility with modern televisions. However, relatively expensive and relatively difficult to install.

    I already have a "Sharp" 68cm CRT which I will use as a benchmark. Here are the specifications:

    68cm screen size
    Front ports: 1x S-Video, 1x RCA
    Back ports: 1x S-Video, 1x or 2x of RCA, 1x or 2x of Component.

    So basically what I'm asking is, are there any CRTs that have better specifications? In particular, I am looking for a bigger screen size, as well as more frontal video ports, and a full range of frontal video ports (including component). The number of video ports isn't too important; I'd usually only be playing one game on one system at a time but a full feature of front video ports is definitely preferred. I heard the Sony Trinitron or Bravia or whatever series, or the Panasonic ones are the last best CRT TVs.

    And if anyone is in Melbourne and is willing to give away what I'm after, I'll gladly take it. ;)

    My plan is for every current generation console (PS3/HDMI, Xbox 360/HDMI, Wii/Component, PSP/Component) to be used with current generation televisions. The PS1/Component and PS2/Component will be used with current generation televisions or if the results are less than satisfactory, on CRTs. Consoles that are capable of S-Video will be used on current generation televisions that have S-Video (tough ask?) or if the results are less than satisfactory, on CRTs. Everything else will be connected to CRTs (via RCA, S-Video, Component).
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2012
  2. trackhappy

    trackhappy Member

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    I liked my old Philips 109P. It had RGB which people seemed to like for this exact thing. It also had a Trinitron tube which were the best of the best. But the fact that it took up about 20x more desk space than my LCDs combined with the additional fact that it was fucked, saw it retired to the skip a few months ago. :upset:

    Oh well, those were the days.

    But to answer your question as far as retro gear goes; if you can find a 109P, get it. Those were the bomb. (Weighed as much as one, too.)
     
  3. kingjam

    kingjam Member

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    When I was using Panasonic and Sony plasma displays at home 2002-2008 say. They had slots you could plug a variety of different video connectors into. Each card would cost somewhere in the order of $50-100.

    Could be another option for you to consider. 50+ inches of multi use plasma sounds better than a honking great CRT.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    layzee

    layzee Member

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    I just did a quick Google search but isn't the 109P a computer monitor? I need a TV. ;) On that note, I noticed that I forgot to add TV to the thread topic title so exactly what CRT is referring to might have been ambiguous (I was referring to big TVs).

    I didn't consider those things, but I think the problem is that, even if an old game console can be connected to a modern TV, the TV will be bad at displaying the pictures of old consoles, and the only way to counter this is using RGB and/or upscalers. Perhaps others can comment on how successful they were using this method.
     
  5. Mau1wurf1977

    Mau1wurf1977 (Banned or Deleted)

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    There is no way around RGB Scart and a decent Sony Trinitron TV. It's simply the best solution.

    If you don't mind a small screen a Philips CM8833 Amiga monitor is my personal number one choice.

    Either one of these options or just go with emulation. Once you go down the path of scalers you will never be 100% satisfied and your wallet a lot lighter.
     
  6. schnappy

    schnappy Member

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    RE Poll: The reason why I've gotten so into collecting game consoles is because 'my' console was the PS, and I felt I missed out a lot on the others as I got a bit older.

    RE OP: I'm going to go on a limb here and suggest emulation? Good emulators with nice graphics filters can give you a fairly authentic look. I like to use the settings that make it look better myself, I like the games not the graphics :) Just my 2c.
     
  7. flugle

    flugle Member

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    Newcastle, NSW
    This. I see enough Sonys given away on Freecycle now it shouldn't be hard to find one.

    I've got a 68cm one (paid $2k for it in 2001 - ouch). It still serves me well for all my consoles.

    It's the only one I could reliably get to display a proper image on my NTSC Atari 5200s - I tried Panasonics, a Loewe and I cant remember what else but they all failed to tune in properly, but the Sony handles everything I chuck at it.
     
  8. frankgobbo

    frankgobbo Member

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    Re poll: Had to be option 1 for me.

    We got a ColecoVision in my house when I was around 3.

    Man I loved that thing.. but hardly approaching my death bed!

    & if you want a CRT, you can't beat a Trinitron if you can find one.
     
  9. darkmenace

    darkmenace Member

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    Sega Master System 2 for me. Bought it from Kmart for $88 in 1992 and it still works fine to this day :)

    Had countless hours of enjoyment out of it!
     
  10. SchRAMBO

    SchRAMBO Member

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    Option 2 for me.

    Only getting back into retro gaming just very recently but now I play my SNES / Famicom systems on a Sony 51cm Triniton flat screen. I will also be playing House of the Dead 2 for the Dreamcast when I get round to it but I normally play the DC on one of my Dell U2311H monitors.

    Just the other week I put an advert up on Perth's Gumtree selling a low end Yamaha AV receiver and that I was looking for a CRT TV / monitor that'll support NTSC. First call I got was this dude wanting the receiver and had a few CRTs he was trying to get rid of including the above mentioned rig. I was so stoked when he rocked up with the thing in the back seat. It's condition is like new and makes playing the old systems so much more enjoyable and nostalgic. It was a bit of a reshuffle and re-organize in my room but I found a perfect spot for it :D
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2012
    Vanne likes this.
  11. Mau1wurf1977

    Mau1wurf1977 (Banned or Deleted)

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    SCANLINES :thumbup:
     
  12. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    1) RGB on CRT or go home

    2) Gynoug for the mother flipping win! :thumbup:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2012
  13. OP
    OP
    layzee

    layzee Member

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    If I wasn't me, this would be how I would have replied to my thread:

    KVHR36M31
     
  14. Rhimes

    Rhimes Member

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    This is the one you want. I've still got my old KVHR32M31 here to hook up for an old console machine, IMO, the best commonly available CRT produced.
     
  15. OP
    OP
    layzee

    layzee Member

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    Actually, I don't want it, because I got it (now). ;)

    KVHR36M31 Pros:

    • Large 36"/90cm screen size (for a CRT).
    • Latest and most mature CRT technology (about 2006) before being phased out by Plasmas/LCDs.
    • Good variety and amount of audio/video ports on both front and rear.
    • "Video quality that can rival even contemporary televisions" (based on Internet opinions). I can't personally confirm the validity of this statement but I'm sure it's got the best blacks.
    • Will never be stolen (see below) and will survive natural disasters.
    • Perfect for pre-PS3/Xbox360 generation consoles. Old consoles were designed for CRT.

    KVHR36M31 Cons:

    • Heaviest. Thing. Ever. The weight of this TV is well known on the Internet. However, comments alone does not do it justice. It has to be seen (felt) to be believed. The TV requires three average men to carry (as evident from the handholds available in three separate locations) or two above-average strength men. My hand/arm was still sore one or two days after carrying it.
    • Largest. Thing. Ever. You need ample space for behind in order to plug the cables etc, otherwise you need a torch to illuminate the black cavern that the back of the TV creates. How does the quote go? When you stare into the back of the Sony KVHR36M31, the abyss stares back into you...
    • Not light and thin like today's televisions. Needless to say. The above points means that no thief (or rather, thieves) will ever consider ever stealing it.
    • No HDMI port. This TV would be even better if it had.
    • No 1080p. Who cares I guess, not a dealbreaker.
    • No component ports on the front. Not that I've ever seen a TV with component ports on the front but it would be nice.
    • Not optimum for PS3-generation consoles and understandably so.

    All I need to do now is to wait for contemporary TV technology to mature...
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  16. MillenniumPanda

    MillenniumPanda Member

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    I've got a 68cm flat screen CRT from 1999 that I used to use for my retro consoles. However, I just now hook them up to my plasma as the size difference outweighs any image advantage of the old CRTs.

    Now, if I could source an 80cm+ Sony Trinitron CRT, that would be a different story!
     
  17. Draxx

    Draxx Member

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    I use an 80CM LG CRT identical to this (not my ad), with a couple of switch boxes hooked to the AV ports. We bought it new about 11-12 years ago and it still works great for me
     
  18. OP
    OP
    layzee

    layzee Member

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    It's alright, I don't need any TV recommendations any more since I got the objectively best one now (see my previous post).

    Unless you just feel like throwing your 2 cents, then go ahead I guess.
     
  19. Urbansprawl

    Urbansprawl Member

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    I'm looking a round for a good CRT for retro consoles - looking at 8 and 16 bit games mostly. As such I'd prefer a 4:3 TV - is there a 4:3 contemporary of the KVHR36M31 that is well regarded?
     
  20. OP
    OP
    layzee

    layzee Member

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    I still think the Nintendo Puu is a good and clever name. Like the Nintendo Wii, it references bodily waste excretions (urine for the Wii, feces for the Puu). Puu also rhymes with "two", the two referring to the dual orifices with which one utilises to expel said waste matter, whether it in liquid, solid, or even gas form (in the case of flatulence).

    I don't know but if there is one, it's most likely a Sony.
     

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