Retro Let's Play: "Monster World IV" (1994)

Discussion in 'Retro & Arcade' started by Grant, Jun 1, 2019.

  1. Grant

    Grant Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Messages:
    1,313
    Location:
    Wollongong
    Community Retro Let's Play for early June 2019.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monster_World_IV
    HG101: http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/monster-world-iv/

    The Wonder Boy/Monster World series have been revived in the last couple of years with two excellent modern indie titles released for PC OSes and console platforms:
    • Wonder Boy: The Dragon's Trap is a remake of the Sega Master System tile Wonder Boy 3: The Dragon's Trap, recreating the gameplay and mechanics with pixel-perfect accuracy, but adding new graphics, audio, and optional additions to the gameplay.
    • Monster Boy and the Cursed Kingdom is more of a sequel, an all-new entry maintaining the style and world elements of the previous games.
    Both are excellent games, highly recommended for new and experienced WB/MW fans alike.

    The various games bearing the names "Wonder Boy" and "Monster World" have various numbers associated with them, it's best not to think too hard about these numbers as some were plain mistakes made during localisation, and defining what games fit in what series and in what order can get confusing very quickly. The best explanation for the modern interpretation of numbers that I've found is here, which uses a citation from the SEGA AGES 2500 collection describing The Dragon's Trap as a "Monster World gaiden", or "side-story", rather than it having its own number in the series.

    Anyway, the two series contain games that can be roughly divided into "action" (scrolling arcade action), and "action-adventure" (adding inventory, character progression and exploration elements shared with metroidvanias). The three action-adventure games available to English-speaking markets on Sega consoles were:
    • Wonder Boy in Monster Land (this originated as an arcade title, but the Sega Master System version was the only official English port).
    • Wonder Boy 3: The Dragon's Trap (SMS/Game Gear).
    • Wonder Boy in Monster World (Sega Mega Drive/Genesis).
    The "Sega consoles" bit is notable because all of these games were reskinned and ported to different consoles in various markets. Greg Sewart did a pretty good dive into it in his review of WB3: Monster Lair:

    Anyway after all of this, one more game was made for the Mega Drive which never made it to English-speaking markets during the 16-bit era: Monster World IV.

    Dropping the "Wonder Boy" side of the dual series made way for a female protagonist, Asha, with her sidekick Pepelogoo. The game features some new mechanics over the previous entries in the series, and apparently dials back on some of the RPG elements to focus a little more on platforming action, but apart from that I'm going in fairly blind to this game, having never played it before. I've played through "Monster Boy and the Cursed Kingdom" though, which lovingly references all of the games that came before it, so beyond the existence of Pepelogoo I expect to see some "reverse references" playing through this.

    Versions of the game
    Currently for sale, your options are Playstation 3 and Xbox 360/Xbox One digital downloads:
    https://store.playstation.com/en-us/product/UP0177-NPUB30324_00-MNSTRWRLD4PSNUS1
    https://www.microsoft.com/en-au/p/s...orld/brl4twknvt82?activetab=pivot:overviewtab

    This version was also available on the Wii, but the Shop Channel is now closed. SEGA AGES titles are making their way to the Switch though, so hopefully the Monster World series will be available again soon.

    The Sega Mega Drive Mini will include the game, and is scheduled for worldwide release on September 19 2019.

    All previous versions were released in Japanese language only:

    SEGA AGES Vol. 29 for the Playstation 2: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sega_Ages#Sega_Ages_2500_(PlayStation_2)

    And the original Mega Drive version, which is playable at the Internet Archive:
    https://archive.org/details/sg_Monster_World_IV_1994_Sega_JP

    It also appears to be in an Internet Archive collection of Mega Drive ROM dumps, if you need an implicitly legal way of getting the original version to patch with a translation.
    https://archive.org/details/SegaGenesisCollection

    But as usual, be sure to get legal advice before clicking on any links on the Web.

    Fan translations
    The Mega Drive version was fan-translated twice, as far as I can tell. The first time was by "demiforce" (this name appears in some pre-patched versions of the game I've seen referenced in ROM collection databases), and demi's translation was used as the basis for an improved translation patch by Di Somma Michele:
    https://www.romhacking.net/translations/1276/

    If you need any help getting the Mega Drive version or applying a translation patch, send me a PM and I'll be able to help.

    Playing the Mega Drive version
    As usual, elvis has you covered with an excellent overview of the Mega Drive and its current retro options: https://forums.overclockers.com.au/threads/retro-faq-sega-megadrive-sega-genesis.1255735/

    Emulation is the easiest option for most people, and the tl;dr there is any emulator setup with RetroArch (eg. RetroPie) should have PicoDrive and Gens Plus, which both do a decent job (PicoDrive has higher performance but reduced accuracy). If you're on a modern PC with a fast CPU, use BlastEm as a standalone emulator. I haven't tried a range of emulators with this game so if there's any feedback about accuracy please post here.

    If you want to run the game on a CRT TV, the cheapest way is via emulation with a Wii or PS3, or a MiSTER with analogue output if you have one. The next level of authenticity is a real Mega Drive with the patched ROM image on a flash cartridge.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2019
    MrMaestro, Agg, Vanne and 2 others like this.
  2. shredder

    shredder Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2001
    Messages:
    11,694
    Location:
    Dec 27, 1991
    I asked my lawyer.
    He said, whats the problem.
    I said, need legal advice.
    He said, what for.
    Grant, I said.
    Whats the grant for, he asked.
    Old games, I say.
    Gays can be any age, he states.
    No GAMES, I exclaimed.
    Sir I'm not playing games with you, he assures.
    Yes you bloody well are, I said.
    He responds Yes, I'll Grant you that.
     
    MrMaestro, WuZMoT, Vanne and 2 others like this.
  3. OP
    OP
    Grant

    Grant Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Messages:
    1,313
    Location:
    Wollongong
    Playing the Mega Drive version - the slightly harder way

    Flash carts are a great way to get ROM data from a PC running on real Mega Drive hardware, but just like people enjoy the aesthetics of having their favourite albums on vinyl records, there's an aesthetic to the "one game per cartridge" format from this era of consoles.

    Most cartridges consist of just a ROM chip (with the game data physically etched onto it at the factory), so in the early days of ROM hacking and amateur development, people would use "donor carts", desolder the game ROM chip, put their code on a user-programmable ROM chip, and put that in the donor cart.

    Games such as Monster World IV have an on-cartridge save functionality, which involves a couple of other chips: some Static RAM (SRAM), a chip to work as a UPS, powering the RAM with a coin battery when it's not plugged in, and some generic logic chips that control whether the RAM or ROM is active as needed. Fortunately, the "yearly American sport" games (think NHL '95) frequently had save functionality, so donor carts with these chips are relatively easy to come by.

    Even better than that, I came across a place called Second Dimension that designed a generic Mega Drive cartridge PCB and sell the boards:
    [​IMG]

    I'm all out of new SRAM chips at the moment though, so I'll start playing MW4 on my socketed board, and transfer the ROM to a new board when I get it populated (the ROM chip in a socket makes it too tall to fit in a plastic cartridge shell).
    [​IMG]

    To get the game onto the chip, I'm using a minipro TL866A which is the fairly common USB replacement for the Willem series of chip programmers I've previously used. This variant has support from some open-source tools so you don't have to use the dodgy-looking Chinese software to use it, but you need an adapter board for the 42-pin EPROM chips used by Mega Drive carts.
    [​IMG]
     
    Vanne and elvis like this.
  4. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    37,448
    Location:
    Brisbane
    This is a cracking game. Huge sprawling adventure with quite a lot of emotion in it (you'll laugh, you'll cry, but you probably won't hurl).

    I've twice played this *almost* to the end, then real life took me away from it. I need to fire it up again and finish it for proper for reals.

    I also definitely recommend people play the prequel (two games before, actually) [Dragon's Trap] and sequel [Monster Boy] (OP links to both). A brilliant series from start to finish.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2019
  5. OP
    OP
    Grant

    Grant Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Messages:
    1,313
    Location:
    Wollongong
    I've spent my last few week's worth of retro gaming time on the Mega Drive prequel, Wonder Boy in Monster World. It plays very much like The Dragon's Trap in that there's a central town that you travel out into the other levels from (and many of the levels/themes from previous games are recreated), but rather than metamorphosing into characters with different abilities, you access new areas via equipment that has different abilities.

    The difficulty was a fair bit higher than The Dragon's Trap though, especially in NTSC mode. The final boss was pretty much impossible, I still don't know how I managed to clear it. About as hard as Super Metroid from memory. I managed to avoid save-scumming via an emulator, but since it's about 2 minutes from game restart to travel to the final boss location once it's unlocked, I did use save states just so that I could practice more consistently.
     
  6. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    37,448
    Location:
    Brisbane
    How do you find it compared to Wonder Boy in Monster Land (the second game in the series)?

    I seemed to remember preferring Land to World. I think I need to go back and play World again, as it's the one I'm the least familiar with.
     
  7. Vanne

    Vanne Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2003
    Messages:
    803
    Nice review Grant, esp the section on making your own carts. :)
    I've never ever played any of the MW/ML titles, but after reading your review and watching a few plays, maybe it's time I did. I've punched so many 20c coins into Wonderboy in the past, it's actually strange that I missed the whole World and Land series. Again, great reviews and thanks for sharing. :D
     
    elvis likes this.
  8. OP
    OP
    Grant

    Grant Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Messages:
    1,313
    Location:
    Wollongong
    Started playing this today, definitely familiar after having played the other games in the series, but the new Arabian themes are great (actually reminds me of Quest for Glory 2 in that regard :))

    As usual with retro though, I spent more time fiddling with the gear than playing the game today. The socketed ROM cartridge I made didn't work, after doing some troubleshooting with a Krikzz cart reader verifying it, I narrowed down the problem to the 16-bit adapter board, which I've never actually used until now. The idea with it is that you set the minipro to write a 27C4096, which is a 512kiB EPROM, and do the programming in blocks for your larger capacity chip. My cart PCB was configured for a 27C322 (32Mbit, 4MiB), so I was doing 8 passes so that the 2MiB game would see the correct data regardless of the state of the #20 address pin (overkill, but I wanted it to work without modifying my test cart).

    To control the passes, there's a block of 3 DIP switches marked A18, A19, A20, for the address lines above the 512KiB region. To program the first block, you want all of those to be low, and to program the last block, you want all of them to be high. The board conveniently has a mask on it that shows "0" and "1" against the DIP settings - 0 would be low, and 1 would be high, at least if I were doing it...

    Anyway, after RTFM (in German) to confirm my suspicions, it was the other way around:
    [​IMG]

    After UV erasing the chip and rewriting it, I got into the game! Success!? Well kinda, until I saved game for the first time, and died a couple of screens later, and the screen just went black and hung. A few more tests showed saving wasn't working.

    It was then that I remembered that I was using a 2MiB game on a cart PCB configured for a 4MiB ROM. I went into this in my Sonic 3 experiment, but Mega Drive games can only access 4MiB of cartridge memory, so if all of that is ROM the game would use a special protocol to tell the cartridge (via some more logic chips) to connect the SRAM up and place it at a known address, do the save/load, then put the ROM back. The problem is that games that were 2MiB or less (ie. Monster World IV) usually just skipped that bit, and assumed that the cartridge RAM was always writable at its own address somewhere between 2-4MiB.

    I had a 2MiB EPROM handy, and a kinda hacked up donor cart that could be repaired to work with it, but rather than continue on that path I just loaded up the game on my Krikzz Everdrive MD. Played for about an hour before the game hung, which was something I've experienced on multiple consoles with the flash cart, and one of the other reasons I avoid it.
     
    Vanne likes this.
  9. power

    power Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2002
    Messages:
    59,327
    Location:
    brisbane
    Great choice, I'm a huge fan of Wonder Boy and have to cop to big having heard of this game before. Keen to try it out though.
     
  10. Boneman

    Boneman Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2003
    Messages:
    6,136
    Location:
    Tokyo
    There is a part with switches and moving platforms near the end that can be incredibly frustrating. It's a great game though.
     
  11. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    37,448
    Location:
    Brisbane
    The very last level is where I typically bail on the game. It'll be my third go at it when I start this time (got Hollow Knight to get through first), and then I need to put the effort in and complete it.
     
  12. Vanne

    Vanne Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2003
    Messages:
    803
    Love your persistence Grant. ;)
    Nice travels in hardware too. Hope you get the saves working. :)
     
  13. OP
    OP
    Grant

    Grant Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Messages:
    1,313
    Location:
    Wollongong
    There's always the "Tell me a Story" difficulty mode:
    https://github.com/libretro/libretr.../Monster World IV (World) (Action Replay).cht

    I can confirm the "infinite hearts" code (FFDA76:000F) works in RetroArch and on real hardware:
    [​IMG]
    (that heart floating in the top-middle of the screen is my heart meter constantly refilling :leet:)
     
    elvis likes this.
  14. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    37,448
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Haha if I ever have to resort to these sorts of things, it's time to put me in a home. :)
     
    Grant likes this.
  15. OP
    OP
    Grant

    Grant Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Messages:
    1,313
    Location:
    Wollongong
    Well the requirements for getting into the second gate are a bit... obtuse. I figured it out without a walkthrough, but only after about 15 minutes of running back and forth in the town trying to figure out what I was missing.

    As for the jumping puzzles, I see the purity in it, but I can also see how the whole "fall into lava -> lose a heart but be teleported back to the start of the screen" mechanic could drive you crazy when the puzzles reach their peak difficulty, and an infinite hearts cheat might not be enough to compensate.
    Amusingly, I'd figured this out before the volcano level by jumping off the cliff at the very start of the game :lol:

    Currently up to the third gate, my favourite translated line so far is the Sage saying "Woo hoo!" when you opt not to save your game...

    Socketed cart PCB going strong and stable when reconfigured to 2MB mode, but I lost a save game when playing with the Pro Action Replay above - I've never actually used one of these before, but I found putting a cheat in the top slot, and adding all the other slots with all zeroes as the code, wipes the save data. It wipes it with something blank-ish looking (lots of "0x00 0x02 0x00", with some "0x08" sprinkled around the SRAM), so I'm not sure what it's doing, but I know the PAR has some RAM of its own so there's possibly a conflict there. The correct thing to do is put the first code in the top slot, then press start to exit out of the code input screen. Fortunately I had a recent backup of the SRAM :thumbup:
     
  16. Boneman

    Boneman Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2003
    Messages:
    6,136
    Location:
    Tokyo
    I also recall you can end up with like 3 hearts to get through it or you have to restart from the witch again. Its one of those cases where you spend 2 days on it, then wake up next morning and bang it out first try.
     
  17. Boneman

    Boneman Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2003
    Messages:
    6,136
    Location:
    Tokyo
    And now on Genesis Mini!
     
    Grant and elvis like this.
  18. OP
    OP
    Grant

    Grant Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Messages:
    1,313
    Location:
    Wollongong
    Complete! This Let's Play fortunately lined up with some time off work I had, so I was able to give it some solid play sessions.

    I loved playing this, definitely one of the top Mega Drive games. Overall, I think it was easier than Wonder Boy in Monster World. There are definitely some tough sections, but it had a much better difficulty curve than WBiMW.

    I don't consider myself particularly good at games, I just love them enough to keep brute-forcing my way through, but this is basically how you play these games. Every time you see a new enemy, obstacle, or puzzle, it can pretty much murder you, stripping off half of your life or more in a single encounter.

    However, you have the Magic Lamp, which will teleport you back to the town, a save point, a full heal, and the shops. Basically, unless you're a low% speedrunner, you have to grind. Stay in the first few screens of a level farming gold for a while, just going back and forth between screens, and teleport back when your health runs out. By the time you have enough gold for the shop equipment available to you for the level, you've already practiced enough against the first part that you can get through it with minimal if any damage. Getting though after this becomes really satisfying, and mid-level save points are spaced well enough that you can repeat this process. New sequence -> die a bit -> get good (it doesn't take long, this isn't Super Meat Boy) -> trounce it.

    Compared to previous Monster World RPGs:

    WBiMW: This really introduced me to the tactic, but I found the early part of the game tougher than it needed to be because you didn't have your Magic Lamp equivalent (a "return" spell that warps you back to the last Inn you stayed at). General difficulty was harder than MWIV for a few reasons:
    • Enemies respawn, and they respawn VERY quickly, sometimes barely giving you enough time to get past them.
    • Invincibility time after getting hit was a lot shorter, so you could get pounded to nothing very quickly.
    • The final boss was insanely tricky to land a hit on and manage everything going on. WBiMW gives you magic like in previous games, but it works a bit differently. You have a list of spells, each with a "capacity", and these uses are refilled every time you heal at an Inn. You can't pause the game to use items, you have to use them in-game by binding them to one of two "slots", and call them with A+L or A+R. You pause the game to load these slots, but it only works when you're on solid ground and not moving, which is very tricky. Also, two of the spells are defensive and offensive boosts - these replace the screen area showing your slots with the meter for the power-up effect, meaning you can't use any items or other magic while these effects are active. MWIV just omits the spells that have been part of Wonder Boy, but the better swordplay makes up for it.
    WB3: The Dragon's Trap: This wasn't as challenging from the start (maybe because I know the game inside out having played it since childhood), but the grinding option is still there. One big example is there's an optional set of "Crystal" gear which is very expensive but helps in the late part of the game. Rather than returning to a save point to heal, you're allowed to just die, respawn at the town, and keep your money.

    WBiML: Given its arcade roots, this one is a quarter/100-yen/20c coin sucker. The SMS version is a one-credit clear or nothing, but the difficulty of the SMS version is toned WAY down from the Japanese arcade version, making it humanly possible for slow but dedicated Western kids. From memory it's about half an hour or less to clear the whole game.

    Anyway, with these tactics, I didn't need an Elixir after the first gate (even for the final boss), and I don't remember if I actually needed it before that.

    The bosses were all fairly easy, usually fairly easy to hit and you could typically go quite aggressive on them. I'd often get low on health by the end of a fight, but I was able to get enough hits in that it didn't matter.

    This was the Aegis castle, and yeah, it took me a while to get through. Again, the trick is to memorise the screens, and they get fairly easy to get through after a few goes. Once you know where to go you can get through each section with minimal damage. If you take too much damage, hit reset and start from the save point, rather than eg. save-scumming with an emulator and wearing the damage through to the next section.

    There was one bit with an impossible jump that was frustrating for a while, before I figured out the "trick".

    Also, there was a bit that taught me fairly organically that there's a way to climb ropes faster than the usual "hold d-pad up". I'm not sure if that would have been mentioned in the original game manual.

    Unless you mean the Aegis castle (the fourth gate) as above, there's a level after that, which is the run to the final boss. This is both a gift to the slow but patient Western kid, and also a great way to wrap up the game.

    After the final gate, you battle the queen in a scripted-lose fight, and after the cutscene the only way out is to Subterrania, the run to the last boss. There's a great homage to "The Last Dungeon" in the music and you fight your way through each of the enemy types you faced in previous levels. The "great way to wrap up the game" is because the length of this level, and the amount of time you spend in it, requires you to (almost) master each of the enemy types again, whereas when you faced them the first time you may have been able to stumble your way through the last few to get to a mid-level save point.

    This may blow your mind Boneman, but YOU DON'T HAVE TO RESTART FROM THE [posessed queen] AGAIN. You still have your Magic Lamp, and you can return to town, heal, and more importantly, spend your money. There's 2 hints that remind you to do this that I picked up on:
    • Prior to entering the fourth gate, the Armour dealer (with the camel) has "Legendary Armor" for sale. It's very expensive at the time, and beyond what grinding is reasonably going to get you. I'm sure some people have done the hours of collecting money, but it's really not necessary at that point to get through the fourth gate. The reason it's there is to tell you it exists, as in every other Monster World RPG, and you should expect to see a Legendary Sword and Legendary Shield.
    • During the Subterrania run to the final boss, you encounter many of the bosses you've previously defeated in earlier levels. When you win, you get a Gold Bar, which is exchangeable in the town for a large sum of money. If you're on your final run to the boss, why would the game be stressing large amounts of money so much? "GIVE ME A BIG HEART DAMNIT!!" was possibly heard on my first run.
    Anyway, similar to Boneman, it took me a few goes to actually test this myself, and I restarted a couple of times from the queen cutscene. I got to final boss in one run with the non-Legendary gear I had from the fourth gate (I used an Elixir in Subterrania to get through one of the boss fights), and even got to the second phase of the boss fight, so it's definitely achievable with some Super Meat Boy-level difficulty, and I think that's the point. The game can be as challenging as you want it to be, but if you take your time you very quickly meet a point where your increasing skills meet the lowering game difficulty as your character gets stronger.

    There's even a few more levels to beating Subterrania, because if you warp out part way through, you'll find the Camel guy that sold the Legendary Armor is missing, apparently gone forever. You can purchase a better sword and shield though, and this helps you get through to the end of Subterrania, skills always improving as you grind. Once you reach the door to the final boss (I think this is what triggers it), the Camel guy reappears in town for you to continue grinding for money to get all of the Legendary equipment (it's not JRPG bad, I had enough money from the Gold Bars to get all but one item).

    The big point is that the bosses you battle on the way down stay dead when you return, making subsequent runs much easier.

    Anyway, now that you're familiar with the whole final run, and used to playing conservatively, there's even more opportunities in there that make the final boss fight even easier:
    • There's a screen where you face a few golems in a row, each of them drops a Life Drop. These can be used to fill your Blue Hearts to max, but I didn't bother grinding back and forth since I was only missing two through fairly normal play and a few one-way runs through that screen. Enemies that drop Life Drops don't respawn, I must have seen them a couple of times after restarting.
    • There's a screen with the Egyptian warriors that fairly often drop health items. I spent some time here thinking "great, I've lost some life getting here, so I'll just spend some time going back and forth filling up my health bar". Very quickly I noticed they also drop Herbs, which are inventory items that can be used to refill 3 hearts. So it's possible to max your inventory with those, I collected a few while farming money.
    • On that note, one or two screens before the end of the run there's a screen with the ghosts that pop up from the ground behind you, these always often drop a heart, so it's easy to refill your life meter here.
    With the Legendary equipment though, I got to the final boss with two hearts missing from my max-capacity pink heart meter, two blue hearts away from max capacity, and I managed to beat it without using any health items.
    Anyway, I've really enjoyed playing through all of these Monster World RPG games, having recently beaten the SMS WBiML and the Mega Drive WBiMW. I can't pick a favourite, they're all at least as good as the famous Dragon's Trap (the MD sequels are much bigger though, and the new Monster Boy is even bigger again).

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2019
    elvis likes this.
  19. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    37,448
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Finally put some time into this, and man I don't remember anything of the intro and early levels. I'm playing this on my MiSTer with the fixed English translation (most recent one on romhacking.net).

    This time around I knew the tricks to buy better gear early on, but I still got smacked about in volcano because I'm old and suck compared to my youth.

    I love the graphics and style to this game, but one thing that lets it down for me is the music. Compared to Dragon's Trap, I think the soundtrack to this is pretty awful. The one exception is the genie music though. Cracks me up every time. :lol:

    Graphics-wise though, brilliant. Too many Megadrive games misuse the limited colour palette and end up with a muddy mess, but not this game. Big, clear, bold sprites. Great graphics, even in the darker areas. Last time I played this was on Wii (bought via Virtual Console). I bought it again on PS3 just this month as it was on sale for $2, but I decided to have a go on MiSTer to see how it went on a CRT. Certainly a different experience to a flat screen. The bright areas wash out a bit on CRT (I had to turn the contrast down a bit compared to the SNES Final Fantasy V and VI games I played last on the same display), but the darker areas look a lot better.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
    Grant likes this.
  20. OP
    OP
    Grant

    Grant Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Messages:
    1,313
    Location:
    Wollongong
    Yeah some of the jumping challenges in the volcano are about as hard as the ones Boneman was talking about IMO, it just takes a couple of goes to get the timing once you know the theory of how to go about a particular screen. If you're prepared to go through each section a couple of times (including all the screens leading up to it if you're only using in-game saves) it helps with the frustration.
     

Share This Page

Advertisement: