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Revitelizing Li-Ion Notebook-Batterypacks, function/construction of BP needed.

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by snn47, Nov 14, 2002.

  1. snn47

    snn47 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2002
    Messages:
    358
    Location:
    D-FRA
    I have a $ony PCG-F707 Notebook with a mob 500/600MHz P3 CPU and the PCGA-BP71 14,8V/2600mAh or PCGA-BP72 14,8V/3000mAh.

    It has a 6 Pin connector, and supplies in addition to the power also information about the Load status and how much the BP has aged in % (charge cycles)

    It started with a strange behavior that the capacity jumped from somewhere around 87% full after 15minutes uses to 10% depleted from one second to another in a second. Consequently the Notebook did shut down as it's supposed to do on low battery.

    A colleague proposed a complete depletion by booting into BIOS settings and letting the Notebook turned on until the battery is completely empty.

    IMHO it's impossible that Li-Batteries just deplete by 70% from one second to another.

    So it's either that the Li-Batteries have never been charged completely to whatever capacity they had left
    or
    the electronic inside the BP is off scale and had has to be recalibrated/reset if possible.

    Now the BP is always 0 and I have no idea how to reset the electronics.


    I took the BP apport and found 8 Panasonic Li-Ion-Batteries GR17670HC. a small PCB with XTAL, CPU? (MP-13 1-671-393-15 inside. The case is basically a plastic cover on top and one on the bottom which is held by double-sided tape at the batteries together. So cautiously warming (max 212┬░Fthe covers could loosen the adhesive force of the tape, while I cracked sides a bit since I used a screw driver:D


    That's what I know so far any idea how to resurect a battery pack or use the connecto for an external battery pack.
     
  2. vthiru

    vthiru Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    927
    Heh okay heres my experience with a Toshiba T1910 battery:

    Its a NiMH 12V 2600 (iirc) mAh battery, with 5 connectors. I opened it up with a screwdriver -- these arent made to be opened again, the "lid" bit is actually bonded to the rest, i dont know how, so it wasnt a good job.

    Anyway, inside I found 10 cells, the a bit longer than AA (its a standard size) that dont have nipples but tabs. They must be in series to get the 12V. The two terminals of the connector at each end are the - and + terminals. I also found a thermistor connected to another two of the terminals. Okay, the last two things i found in there were some elongated metallic thing shaped like this:

    Code:
    ----------<=====>-----------
    
    about double to triple the size of a normal resistor. It's metallic and has no markings on it. And the last item was some cuboidal thingo shaped like this:

    Code:
         _________
    ====|_________|
    
    It too is completely metallic and has the following markings on it:

    IP325AC-B 70C
    ISUZU [blackrectangle] 4E3

    I have no idea what the above two are, the first one is in series between the first two and the rest of the cells, the second one is in a funny position near one edge of the pack and I cant see its connection.

    Replacement cells from Jaycar cost at least $12 per cell (the cheaper one) so that would be $120 to replace them. (Probably wont do it).

    So... is there any way to revive the battery pack?

    vthiru
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2002
  3. Nyquist_Theorem

    Nyquist_Theorem Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2001
    Messages:
    324
    Location:
    South Yarra
    if thats a li ion battery i reckon its shot, gonzo, trashward bound. sounds like just a dying one, and you're probably better scouring ebay. that dropping from 80% to 5% in an instant = typical behaviour of a dead/dying li ion. sorry mate.
     
  4. DumHed

    DumHed Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2002
    Messages:
    59
    Location:
    Sydney
    The first one will be a temperature sensor, and the second a thermal circuit breaker... The temp sensor will be connected to the charging circuit, and the breaker in series with the batteries, as a safety cutout in the even of overcharging.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2002
  5. GESTARK

    GESTARK New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    Revitalizing any rechargeable battery, LI, NIMH, Nicad etc

    Saw your post and thought you would be interested in this thing I built some time ago.
    I am an electronics technologist and with a specialty in telecommunications and I have also done some engineering and design work since starting in this field in 1974 so yeh I am not an old man my Son calls me Senior though.

    If you have any soldering experience you can pick up some 2500 mah everedy or any cheap Li Ion Battery and replace them all. They are smaller than the original panasonics but they have a better amp hour output and rating so you will get more time on your BP.

    The alternitive is to ZAP the old batteries back into life. With my zapper it will bring most rechargable batteries back to life to about 95 to 99 %
    :cool:
    The zapper can be built from and old computer power supply and you even
    get the case/encosure for free from some old computer thrwn away or
    whatever.
    If you interested in the design send me back an email.

    To gestark@shaw.ca
     

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