RJ11 and RJ45 wiring

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by unix, Aug 24, 2007.

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  1. unix

    unix Member

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    I am planning to install a RJ45 flush plate close to the telephone flush plate. What I am trying to do is to place the ADSL modem in a room rather than in the kitchen area. To do so, I am planning to get a cable with RJ11 in one end, and RJ45 in the other, so it can go from the central filter (adsl modem outlet) to the RJ45 outlet, and then at the end of the RJ45 (in bedroom), RJ45 -> RJ11 -> Modem.

    How do I go abouts wiring RJ11 to RJ45 plug, in terms of the pin outs etc.

    Cheers.
     
  2. nux

    nux Member

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    Just use an RJ11 cable to connect it on both ends, it'll fit and will do what you want.
     
  3. tin

    tin Member

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    Yeah... It'll plug in fine.

    Also, isn't it RJ12 that phone sockets use? RJ11 is the smaller ones for handset leads, isn't it?

    Edit: Phones simply use the middle 2 pins. Applies to both RJ45 and RJ11 (or 12).
     
  4. nux

    nux Member

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    RJ12 is 6 pins, whereas phone sockets are RJ11 which is 4 pins.
     
  5. tin

    tin Member

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    They're still 6 wide though, just not got the side pins present...
    According to some web sites, the name RJ11 gets used for both, which I think is silly (and probably isn't right).
     
  6. Icidic

    Icidic Member

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    Yep. I'll reiterate what everone's said:

    RJ-11: Used for Telephone communications, has 4 pins on the jack with only 2 occupied by copper contacts.
    RJ-12: Used for Telephone communications, has 6 pins on the jack with only 4 occupied by copper contacts.
    RJ-45: Used for Telephone\Data communications, has 8 pins on the jack with all 8 occupied by copper contacts.

    That's what you'll find by default on what you'd buy from Dick Smith Electronics or Jaycar, etc. As a general guide, no matter what pins are occupied by copper contacts, only the middle pair are used for Telephone communications (in Australia) and all 8 copper contacts, seen only on the RJ-45 jack, are used for Data communications.

    N.B. 'RJ' stands for Registed Jack.

    :). Hope that clears things up a little.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2007
  7. MrvNDMrtN

    MrvNDMrtN Member

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    Obviously you're not a registered cabler so you'll need to pay for someone licensed to do this work.
     
  8. zetter

    zetter Member

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    There's a great Wiki article on Registered Jacks
     
  9. TheWedgie

    TheWedgie Insert Custom Title Here

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    Closed as per the sticky.

    -Nick
     
  10. OP
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    unix

    unix Member

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    The phone line is ALREADY terminated onto the RJ11 flush plate. Why would a licensed cabler be needed? I am just using an external cable to hook onto the connector into an internal network. I am not redoing the phone side of things.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    unix

    unix Member

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    I think you misunderstood this whole post. The flush plate for the phone line is already terminated. All I am doing is asking about using a RJ11 cable to plug into the RJ45 end of an internal network.
     
  12. TheWedgie

    TheWedgie Insert Custom Title Here

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    Correct, however, from reading your post, it seems as if you are intending to install the RJ45 point yourself, and then connecting it to the telecommunications network, therefore a registered cabler must perform the work.
    If this is not the case, please PM me with a clarification, and I will unlock the thread.

    -Nick
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2007
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