RJ45 socket wall plates

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by Sankari, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. Sankari

    Sankari Member

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    I'm extending my network from one end of the house to another, and want to install a socket on the wall at each end. Ideally I would like something which allows me to plug an ethernet cable into the back of the plate and another one into the front. Does such a thing exist? If so, are they OK or is the connection a bit dodgy?

    Otherwise, what's my alternative and how do I wire it up? Are different faceplate sockets optimised for specific cables (ie. Cat5e) or will they work perfectly with anything?

    :confused:
     
  2. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    if you can be bothered getting up into the dusty/smelly roof. there are products on the market..otherwise drop me a line and i can do all the dirty work for you...

    cablers won't use the "clip through" sockets as they tend to fail badly, also the "stranded" cable that patch leads are made of isn't suitable for in roof installtion
     
  3. Doc-of-FC

    Doc-of-FC Member

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    Last edited: Apr 8, 2010
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    Sankari

    Sankari Member

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    Thanks pugs. I' spent two hours installing several dozen metres of Cat5e in the roof yesterday . It currently drops down from the ceiling at either end and I just wanted to tidy it up a bit. If the clip through sockets are no good, I'll avoid them.

    When you refer to stranded cable, do you mean the standard 8-core Cat5e/Cat6 cable? Why isn't it suitable for roof installation? What else would you use?

    :confused:
     
  5. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    Solid core can only be used for installations. not my rules i just have to deal with them...
     
  6. Doc-of-FC

    Doc-of-FC Member

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    Sankari

    Sankari Member

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    I don't understand what you mean by "solid core." What is "solid core" cable? What does it look like, where would I get it, and is it illegal to run Cat5e or Cat6 through the roof?

    That's helpful but it seems to show regular Cat5e cable. What's this "solid core" business?
     
  8. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    for you to do yes it is Illegal


    the stranded cable has very small strands of wire in them that make up the entire length makes them more flexible for patch leads and short runs where as in roof you need to have less flexibilty while "solid core" is a solid peice of copper wire inside the PVC jacket (still 4 pairs of wires in there)
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2010
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    Sankari

    Sankari Member

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    Well, too late. It's done. If the South Australian police want to come and arrest me, I'm sure they'll get around to it in their own time.

    How the hell can you attach a single solid core to an ethernet plug? Or do you only attach it to the wallplate? :confused:
     
  10. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    it still has 8 inner wires..... they get punched down...
     
  11. OP
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    Sankari

    Sankari Member

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    Can you post a pic, please? Is Cat6 a solid core cable?
     
  12. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    Each of those 8 wires, has a solid copper core, instead of each of the 8 wires being made up of multiple fine strands of copper.

    No, you can get solid or stranded in all categories of cable.

    Solid core is used for fixed installations, it conducts better, but is less flexible, and prone to internal breaks if it's flexed to much. Stranded is used for patch leads because it is nice and flexible and won't break as easily, but is a poorer conductor, so only used in short lengths where possible.
     
  13. OP
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    Sankari

    Sankari Member

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    Good grief, these terms are all so ridiculously misleading.

    If someone said "solid core" to me, I would take this to mean a single strand of solid wire. I would not take it to mean eight separate strands of wire with a piece of plastic in the middl.
     
  14. ewok85

    ewok85 Member

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    This isn't consumer products - this is stuff used by people who have training and licenses in how to use them :rolleyes:

    It isn't misleading at all, you just lack to knowledge to make the connection.
     
  15. OP
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    Sankari

    Sankari Member

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    They are consumer products. I walked into Dick Smith and bought 5m of Cat6 yesterday. Very simple. Nobody stopped me at the door and said "That's not for consumers, give it back!" :wired:

    Yes, I lack the knowledge to "make the connection" (nice pun!) That's why I'm here, asking questions. :)
     
  16. infiltraitor

    infiltraitor Member

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    all consumer network cables that you buy from dick smiths are stranded core and not suitable for in-wall installations

    the "non-consumer" stuff you'd get in a big reel from middys etc. you'd get about 300m of it. have to punch down into a wall port etc (or add your own RJ45 ends if you're that way inclined.


    the cops wont come after you about uncertified cabling but if your insurance company finds out they will void your insurance and if it causes any issues (like shorting out power) you arent covered
     
  17. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    that would be because they are "patch leads" used on the customer side of the wall plate not the other side.. DS, JC and other "electronics" stores don't care if you are a licenced cabler or not they are just selling a product. 99% of ther staff are purely sales people
     
  18. Vladdo

    Vladdo Member

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    How does someone find out if work carried out is certified or not? do you get paperwork for certification? what if it gets lost?
     
  19. ewok85

    ewok85 Member

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    What you are/have done is no different to buying an electrical extension cable and run it through the wall.

    The answer would be that:

     
  20. OP
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    Sankari

    Sankari Member

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    Gotcha, thanks.

    Yep, that's right. Easy as! :D

    Thanks, this is all very informative. :)

    So the situation seems to be this: if I run a Cat5e cable through my house along the skirting board or the wall, or even up on the ceiling, that's legal. But if I run it through the roof, that's illegal. Correct? :wired:

    And if I want a legal roof installation, it has to be done with solid core, by someone who's qualified. Correct?

    Hard to see how a Cat5e cable could short out the power, since it's not connected to any power lines. :confused:
     

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