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REVIEW Simplecom SE513 NVMe USB C Enclosure

Discussion in 'Storage & Backup' started by Ratzz, Oct 12, 2019.

  1. Ratzz

    Ratzz Member

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    Hi and welcome to my basic review of my new NVME USB enclosure.

    Product details

    Simplecom SE513 NVMe PCIe (M Key) M.2 SSD to USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type C Enclosure 10Gbps Black

    Here's an image from the Simplecom website. I purchased this enclosure for ~50 bucks (posted) from Kogan, but they can be found at similar prices from many mainstream sources online.

    This image depicts the grey version, but they are also available in black, as mine is.


    [​IMG]


    Here's what came in the package.
    • The enclosure
    • 20cm USB C <> USB C cable. with a handy trapped Velcro strap for portability
    • USB C <> USB A adapter
    • a little screwdriver


    [​IMG]


    Here it is dismantled. Among the pile of stuff there you can see the 256GB Intel 760P NVME drive I'm fitting to this enclosure. Not the fastest of drives, but plenty good enough for a nice USB transport drive. Here's a link to the drive specs , which are nominally 3210MB/s read and 1315MB/ write when installed on a PCIE3 X4 NVME motherboard slot.

    Before installing the drive, I actually replaced the pictured end cap and removed the one from the other end, as I found it easier to install from the other end. The caps at either end are retained by 2 small screws.

    [​IMG]


    A drive retention screw was not included in the package, although there is a nut to screw it into. However, as it is quite a snug fit inside the enclosure, I felt it was not necessary, and not having a suitable screw handy, I simply slid it into the enclosure without the retention screw.

    This simply involved the removal of two tiny screws on the opposite end of the USB C port, removing the cap, sliding the board with the drive installed into the end, and replacing the cap.


    [​IMG]


    I connected it directly to the Gen 2 USB 3.1 header on my motherboard, simply because my computer case is in a state of flux right now and it was easier to access the header than the rear IO port.


    [​IMG]


    Firstly, I copied a 225GB folder, containing 495 individual TV episodes in .avi format, from a Seagate 2.5" 5200rpm spinning disk HDD onto the empty (formatted to NTFS [quick] ) NVME USB 3.1 drive.

    Speeds ranged from a maximum of about 107 MB/s to a minimum of 92 MB/s, remaining above 100 MB/s for the majority of the time. Clearly this is the limit of the source 2.5" Hard Drive rather than the USB drive.


    [​IMG]


    I then cut that folder from the USB drive and pasted it into a new folder on my 'C' drive, which is a 512GB Samsung 960 Pro. Sppeds ranged from a maximum of 378 MB/s to a minimum of 362 MB/s, mostly hovering around 370MB/s.

    SInce I'm copying via a Gen 2 3.1 header directly to a fast NVME onboard drive, the additional speed is immediately apparent. This is therefore about the maximum possible sustained read speed the enclosure and drive combination can offer.


    [​IMG]


    The 3rd test was cutting the same folder from my 'C' drive and pasting it back to the USB drive. Speeds ranged from an initial burst of 295MB/s to some short periods of 65MB/s, with one 5 second period dropping as low as 25MB/s.

    The first half of the transfer for the most part remained fairly steady at about 260MB/s, then during the second half began to pogo between about 270MB/s and 65MB/s, for periods of between 19-20 seconds on each bounce.
    Not as good as the read speeds, nor as consistent, but still not bad at all in my opinion. I was a little disappointed with the erratic speeds in the second half of the transfer, but still perfectly satisfactory given that this was a 225GB file transfer.


    [​IMG]


    While the drive was full, I then ran Crystal Disk on the drive. I wanted to see if the drive would be slower when full than it was when empty.


    [​IMG]


    I then formatted the drive to NTFS (quick) and repeated the Crystal Disk benchmark. It appears that the answer is no, there is little difference between full and empty when it comes to drive speed.


    [​IMG]


    CONCLUSION.
    I regularly kept feeling the enclosure as I did these tests. It got fairly warm, without actually getting too hot, so the aluminium body appeared to work quite well as a heat sink.

    Note that the drive started as a formatted (NTFS quick) drive, and all tests were performed back to back. The drive had no chance to cool from the first of these tests to the last.

    Given that it has done three 225GB transfers, back to back, I thought it did well for cooling.

    Speeds are not spectacular for an NVME drive, but as a 256GB USB 3.1 data transport drive (my main purpose being sustained sequential reads and writes) I would consider this drive to be quite quick for what it is.

    Construction is solid, and it should last for years to come.

    Of course, it could be used in a standard USB 3.0 port too, either via USB C or USB A using the provided adapter. Speeds would be considerably lower though, I was mainly interested in the high speed interface which is the one I am most likely to use, but I will certainly test it via slower interfaces sometime soon and post those results too.

    My single complaint is that I would have preferred it to have a male connection on the enclosure rather than a female, to allow use without a cable. A suitable cable to suit the male connector of course would still be useful, but I'm going to deduct one star due to requiring a cable at all to use it.

    I'm going to give it 4 Stars :thumbup:.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2019
  2. juzz86

    juzz86 Member

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    Top write-up mate.

    Ran out of pseudo-cache on the last leg by the looks of it. Agree with your consensus - great transport drive.
     
    Ratzz likes this.
  3. OP
    OP
    Ratzz

    Ratzz Member

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    Thanks Justin :) I'll have to try it out via standard USB 3.0 too and see how it goes. There will be plenty of times when I am fixing someone elses machine and they don't have a fast interface. I think the results are predictable though, I believe it will simply max out USB 3.0 on all tests, flat lines. Especially if their OS drive is a spinner of course.. it will clearly max out any spinner. It will be interesting to try though :thumbup:
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2019
  4. issa2006

    issa2006 Member

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    hi just some info

    [​IMG]


    iv got a z270g striz matx borard, the samsung 960evo 512g stick in a jmb mic orical 10gbps drive

    in this pc it get around 990mb/sec read n write (win 7), but on a x99 pc with a gigabyte 10gbp/s card (x4 pci card) it only gets 550mbc read, n 470mb/sec write in crystalmark

    the card got full bandwith x4 pci-e v3.0, if you plug in a mnvme pci0e x4 card the 960evo get full 3600+mb/s read,.

    so why the gigabyte 10gbpc card (in c port) gets only 550 read, i dont know.




    iv got a 2nd 10gbps card.


    ill trying plugin it in.

    ill try the gigabyte card in my z270 board too

    and i baught a 8ware 10bp usb a to c cable.

    il try the onboard x99 10bps a ports.


    but on note why its running slower on a 10gbps gigabyte usb card not sure...\

    ill post the benchies, their on the x99, tinypics dead now

    heres a bench on the z270 with c port at back with windows 10 960 evo
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2019
  5. issa2006

    issa2006 Member

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    i had to replace the thermal pads
    (2x small peices) with a full size one (from a m.2 heatsink you but from ebay) i put in the thicker pad (came with 1 thin, one thicker)

    now it cools better as it making contact with the 960evo 512g)
    aslo if you pull of the red heat sink you can put in a xdata 1tb rgb ssd with leds, but software does not work with usb, but you can program your leds in you pc first , then transfer to cleat stick.

    [​IMG]

    i have tried it, it works (you unscren the 4 screws on the red heatsink, the adata just fint in perfect with plastic shroud, and it looks good, but i din not take any picture, my adata in in my x99 now. (rotated m.2 ssds)

    their is a 1 deg diff with leds on or off..) you can program them with add on pci-e card, or onboard motherboard, as long as it detect using the mnve driver vs usb 3 onbe (comes up as jbm micron controller)

    it is very important that the m.2 nmve are cooled, they can get very hot

    sata based ones are fine
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2019
  6. OP
    OP
    Ratzz

    Ratzz Member

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    That's all very interesting. I'm impressed with the numbers, this is possibly due to the much higher quality drives installed in your enclosure. However, although a few short comments about your enclosure would have been ok, and you were of course welcome to comment on the review of the Simplecom drive, this was not a review of your Orical drive.

    If you'd like to post a review of your drive, then feel free to make a thread about your drive and be as detailed as you like. I'm sure myself and others would be most interested to read it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2019
  7. akromatic

    akromatic Member

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    can you get a pic of the XPG RGB SSD in the clear orico case, i wanna know how it looks like.

    btw having a heatsink on the nvme makes a huge difference. if its one of those slide in enclosures where the SSD doesnt make contact with the shell, it would throttle pretty bad. i get pretty mixed speeds from 40mb to 400mbps but once i take it out of the enclosure and attached a crappy nvme heatsink to it , it double in speed and runs more consistent with the same enclosure/interface
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2019
  8. juzz86

    juzz86 Member

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    Also a quick note on fast M.2s for you lads - just cool the controller if you can, cooling the NAND isn't necessary or even beneficial in regular use.

    NAND likes it hot (but not too hot, otherwise retention tanks), the controller is where they throttle! Snip your thermal pads down to suit :thumbup:
     
    Ratzz likes this.

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