Slow roasted Beef Ribs

Discussion in 'Geek Recipes' started by Johnbu, Jan 11, 2014.

  1. Johnbu

    Johnbu Member

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    I thought I'd share as I'm roasting it now for lunch ~ 12 hours.

    It's also called asado, $6/kg. I purchased 4 strips (3kg) and cut it in half to fit the dish . I also removed a hard skin like layer.

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    Beef short ribs- american style rub with some olive oil to help the rub stick.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I also put extra salt, pepper, paprika and garlic powder.

    Marinated for 24 hours, then placed on top of sliced onions.

    Wrapped up in foil, one layer long ways and one short ways.

    Here is why they are packed so closely.

    [​IMG]

    I've also got a leg of lamb in there also.

    75 degrees, fan forced. The Bosch oven is fairly accurate.

    I've done the lamb for 12 hours plenty of times, but never beef short ribs this way before.

    I'll pull it out to test the internal temp in the morning and make some adjustments if necessary. I've got a thermopen, excellent tool.

    If I had just the lamb, I would set the oven for 90deg, so it the meat breaks down rather just cooked.

    I'll decide if I will remove the foil in the morning and let it roast uncovered for a couple of hours.

    Yes, it would be better cooked in a proper BBQ with charcoal, but I don't have a big green egg.

    I will coat some BBQ sauce on half of it for people who prefer BBQ flavor.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2014
  2. OP
    OP
    Johnbu

    Johnbu Member

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    7 hour update

    [​IMG]

    I need not worry, the lamb will be nicely cooked but not overcooked or dry. But I'm not sure it will be able to be pulled apart with your fingers (like you can cooking at 90 degrees).

    Even without a thermometer I could tell the lamb will be OK by looking at the amount of fat that was melted away.

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    The ribs at the top internal temp is about 10degrees lower than the lamb and bottom ribs. I've removed one layer of foil to get a more even temp.

    Next time I'll try not to cut the ribs as the meat shirks considerably.

    I can't find anything on the net about the ideal internal temp of beef short ribs. So not sure if 59 or 68 deg is better. I think it's the latter.

    Another benefit is low temp cooking apart of not overcooking it is the ability to pull the trays out of the oven with your bare hands.

    If you're slow roasting without a quality thermometer, you're cooking blind.

    It's been an invaluable cooking tool.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2014
  3. OP
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    Johnbu

    Johnbu Member

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    10 hours.

    The ribs are cooked pink, but I would like it more tender.

    [​IMG]

    I've decided to cook both the lamb and ribs uncovered for the final 2 hours.

    The lamb hasn't increased internal temp for at least the past 3 hours.
     
  4. hsvguy

    hsvguy Member

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    nice work, I think your temps are a little low for the result you are trying for as you mentioned. Doesn't collagen only start to break down at around 76 degrees?
     
  5. hippyhippy

    hippyhippy Member

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    Im no expert but asado isnt slow cooked is it? And u need to cook it over charcoal.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Johnbu

    Johnbu Member

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    The beef was Ok, tender but not melting. The reason I put it at 75 is due to the fan force, usually adds another 20 degrees.

    [​IMG]

    Ill try 85 next time.

    Most american recipes are slow cooked but yes you can do it over charcoal (like the Argentinians) but its a little tough.

    Overall, a little disappointing, but never mind, nothing ventured, nothing gained. I'll still eat it! lol
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2014
  7. Amfibius

    Amfibius Member

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    No, the function of collagen breakdown is related to both time and temperature. The rate increases as the temperature increases. Cook at a high temperature (e.g. in a pressure cooker), and you only need an hour. Cook at a low temperature, and you need a lot of time. If the ribs are at 68C at a steady state temperature, it probably needs about 24 hours at that temperature in total. When I SV my beef ribs I cook it at 60C for 48 hours.

    To the OP: I have found that any salt in the rub tends to increase moisture loss when the cooking time is prolonged. Because of this I tend not to add salt to the rub until the end. The best way I have found is to baste it liberally with brine. I make up my brine by adding salt to apple juice mixed with apple cider vinegar. The wet brine cools the surface of the ribs and prolongs cooking. For me, that is an advantage because I cook my ribs in a Kamado.
     
  8. hsvguy

    hsvguy Member

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    Ahh yep that makes sense, so he just needed more time then.
     
  9. kerr34

    kerr34 Member

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    get the internal temp to about 82 if you want it to be able to be pulled :)
     
  10. OP
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    Johnbu

    Johnbu Member

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    Thanks, I'll try again.

    Not sure if I should use the fan force function
     

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