SO MUCH HEAT: PC generates so much!

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Hardware' started by NitroGuy, Feb 13, 2015.

  1. NitroGuy

    NitroGuy Member

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    Hey guys I've got an Intel Q9400 (not OCed) and an Nvidia 8800GT in my room and it just generates so much heat.

    I can manually increase the fans inside the case that's connected to a switch. Would this help or make things worse?

    I've got the top of the case open if that makes a difference?.
     
  2. power

    power Member

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    you are looking for good airflow, so cool air to the components and then hot air exhausted out.

    So normally intakes are on the front and/or side and exhausts are top and/or rear.

    and yes the 8800GT was a warmish card.

    Increasing the speed of any fan will help the overall situation.

    Q9400 was a fairly cool running processor unless you've throttled the CPU fan down.

    Also it can depend on the game you are running, some will cause a PC to heat right up.
     
  3. the3coopers

    the3coopers Member

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    What do you mean "generates heat"?

    Anything that uses power generates heat. More watts = more heat.

    Why do you care how much heat it makes anyway? Heat doesn't really hurt computers, they are specifically designed to handle it.
     
  4. the3coopers

    the3coopers Member

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    That will make the fans run faster. It may or may not make the computer components cooler. If you run the fans faster then that will use a bit of extra power, so the total heat from the computer will be slightly greater with the fans running faster.

    That might not be a good idea, since it might mean that fresh cool incoming air is going straight out the top, whilst the CPU and GPU are sitting in hot stale air below. Then again, it might improve things.
    - Having an open top certainly doesn't make any difference to the total amount of heat.

    The thing about your questions is that only YOU can answer them. If you can change the fan speed, then why don't you just do it and see what happens? That will give you a definitive answer that nobody here can possibly give.
     
  5. kix

    kix Member

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    If it's under your desk, it traps the heat.
    Open a window or door (if not watching porn) and it should be much better.
     
  6. walker_2003

    walker_2003 Member

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  7. Sebstar

    Sebstar Member

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    What's your question op?

    Is your room getting too hot? If that's the case, no amount of fan cooling will improve that. Buy lower power consumption computer or water cool the entire thing.
     
  8. kesawi

    kesawi Member

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    How will water cooling reduce the heat going into the room? Sure the component temperatures may be cooler, but won't the PC still be consuming the same amount of power, plus a little extra to run the pumps, and therefore dissipating the same amount of energy into the room.
     
  9. im late

    im late Member

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    WC'ing one of my previous builds did reduce the ambient room temp, not much, but enough to notice.

    Maybe the op doesn't like the fact the room is warmer?

    Summer season?

    If a warm room is an issue, that is part and parcel of some builds.. :(

    Swap with parts with lower TDP's. This will help reduce the overall temp.

    Or another suggestion is to cover the top of the case (or go buy a new case, they are cheap) and make sure you have a good intake/out take path for the air.

    In any case, experiment and see how you go. :thumbup:
     
  10. Paulie_AU

    Paulie_AU Member

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    Likely the watercooling changed the way the heat was leaving the computer and made the immediate environment feel cooler. It in no way changes the amount of heat load that the computer is imparting on the room. The only way to reduce the heat load into the room is to run components that consume less power to do their task (as you said).

    My watercooling has actually made where my computer sits feel hotter :confused:. This is because I have gone with lower fan speeds for less noise and this is throwing the air out the top of my case at a lower velocity (it lives under my desk). The components are cooler after hours of gaming and it deals with warm ambient temps better, just I seem to sweat it out a little more. Silly thing is now I run a small desk fan under the desk blowing on my legs in the peak of summer.......it is louder than my computer :Paranoid:
     
  11. Spork!

    Spork! Member

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    While gaming the exhaust from my PC is 15+c above the intake. The room does warm up, especially the area above and behind the PC.
    This is a good thing IMO, as it means the heat my components (4790k, R9 280 + R9 280x) generate is being removed from the components by their heat sinks then from the case by the fans.

    If the room gets too hot (summer, no air con) I either stop gaming or play something less.
     
  12. im late

    im late Member

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    Oh most defiantly. Whether one has water-cooling or air cooling setup in their PC, it is not going to change the amount of wattage produced.

    A certain level of wattage is going to produce a certain level of "heat" (measured in degrees).

    At the end of the day OP, if heat in the room is of concern, then unfortunately you might have to look at components that are rated a lower TDP's.

    For example your Q9400 is rated at 95W TDP @ 2.66GHz:

    http://ark.intel.com/products/35365/Intel-Core2-Quad-Processor-Q9400-6M-Cache-2_66-GHz-1333-MHz-FSB

    A i5-2500S is rated at 65W TDP @ 2.7GHz:

    http://ark.intel.com/products/52211/Intel-Core-i5-2500S-Processor-6M-Cache-up-to-3_70-GHz

    Similar quad core performance but producing lower overall heat in the room.

    I recently built a PC with low TDP components for my Wife's cousin as she has a small study. Bought her a i7-3770S.
     
  13. AEKaBeer

    AEKaBeer Member

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    Undervolting is a cheap simple way to reduce heat, it will mean losing bigger overclocks but with most of my hardware I've been able to get a faster than stock CPU/GPU that has lower power draw and heat.
     
  14. the3coopers

    the3coopers Member

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    The best thing is to open the window in the room.

    Because reducing the total heat from the PC might be desirable for 2-3 months in summer, but what about in Winter when you need that emitted heat to make the room more comfortable? A window can be used as a manual control to adjust this as neded.

    For example your Q9400 is rated at 95W TDP @ 2.66GHz:

    http://ark.intel.com/products/35365/Intel-Core2-Quad-Processor-Q9400-6M-Cache-2_66-GHz-1333-MHz-FSB

    It is unlikely that 30W would make the slightest noticeable difference to room temps. It 's a piss-ant amount of difference - to understand this, remember that it would take a air conditioner or heater of 1500W or even 2000W to provide any decent amount of temperature change in a normal sized bedroom.

    Anyway, the modern CPU only used 30W less when loaded, and most of the time it will be idle.... maybe 10W lower (I haven't checked it's specs)
     
  15. demiurge3141

    demiurge3141 Member

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    I find this against the laws of physics...
     
  16. im late

    im late Member

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    This is true - assuming one actually has a window in the room?

    What about all the people who don't use their home theatre as one and instead use it as a study or computer room?

    I use my home theatre room as the computer/office room as that suits our needs for our house. As such I notice room temps more than when I had my computer in the living area (at one stage previously).

    But this is all obvious chit chat. I am sure the OP had the thought to regulate temps with the window if they actually have one!!
     
  17. im late

    im late Member

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    Physics trumps what a human being "feels".

    But hey, I just posted what I "felt". :tongue:
     
  18. im late

    im late Member

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  19. the3coopers

    the3coopers Member

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  20. shane41

    shane41 Member

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    What part didn't you like Mr Coops ??

    A bunch of nerds shacked up together with common interests..........
    OR all five of them had better pc's then you :tongue:
     

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