Solid state hard drive prices

Discussion in 'Storage & Backup' started by toe2toe, Feb 19, 2007.

  1. toe2toe

    toe2toe Member

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    I came across this site selling solid state hard drives and almost fell over at the prices:

    http://www.dvnation.com/nand-flash-ssd.html

    :eek:

    But then found some other products like this ultra mobile PC with a 32GB SSD included for what seems like a reasonable price:

    http://www.expansys.com/p.aspx?i=139989&stack=technical&action=open#technical

    So there seems to be some contradictory prices out there at the moment. Does anyone know when we can expect these sorts of things to be available in regular retail outlets and what sort of prices they'll go for initially? I reckon it would be a good upgrade for a laptop, you'd sacrifice some size but make up for that with nice gains in speed, battery life, quieter and cooler operation.
     
  2. FoderMe

    FoderMe Member

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    You fell over at the prices? Why? They seem very reasonable to me. ~$60-$90 / gb for a SSD doesn't seem too overly priced for currently available devices.

    I've heard about some other SSD's being released later this year that should be cheaper, but regardless, there's still going to be some quite large differences between them and the price of a 'regular' platter drive.
     
  3. stalin

    stalin (Taking a Break)

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    Price performance, SSD is still great. 1 enterprise SSD can do 100K IO/ps you need a huge bank of FC/SCSI disks to produce the same IO/ps, so they can be cheaper in low data, high performance environments.

    Home user though, everything takes a while before it filters down. Give it time.. or wait till it gets mass deployed in a new iPod..
     
  4. OP
    OP
    toe2toe

    toe2toe Member

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    I suppose, like anything new the early adopters pay a premium and especially for the largest size available at the moment - 64 GB with some of the models going for $10,000! I reckon when 64 GB eventually comes down to sub $500 prices people might start buying them.
     
  5. Whisper

    Whisper Member

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    I think people will start buying them before the $500 mark.
     
  6. FoderMe

    FoderMe Member

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    I for one won't be getting involved until they hit around the $20-$25 /gb mark.
     
  7. ADV

    ADV Member

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    HyperDrive4 (Revision 2)

    The hyperdrive is not volatile, it uses an external power supply to retain its data.

    I think the hyperdrive is faster than FLASH RAM BASED solidstate HD's, since it uses ddr.

    I read up that FLASH RAM BASED solidstate drives aren't that much faster than standard 7200rpm or 10,000rpm drives in non raid configurations.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2007
  8. proffesso

    proffesso Member

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    that hyperdrive is very expensive for what it is, and is it volitle?


    once I can get a 64gb SSD for around $600, im there.
     
  9. fester2001

    fester2001 Member

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    I would go a 32GB model for 300$
     
  10. FoderMe

    FoderMe Member

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    That's just another version of the i-ram unit.
    http://www.gigabyte.com.tw/Products...ew.aspx?ProductID=2180&ProductName=GC-RAMDISK

    The i-ram (currently at v1.3) was said to be coming out in a v2 format, allowing a 8gb capacity. But that was quite some time ago, so I think the project may have been scrapped due to more affordable SSD's coming into the market.

    As drool worthy as they both are, the price is very repelling.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2007
  11. proffesso

    proffesso Member

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    sounds volitile to me, if you have to keep power on it at all times.

    SSD str's isnt much faster than a normal 10k rpm drive, its the random reads iops where it kills a conventional hdd.

    raid0 a pair of em if you want higher str
     
  12. stalin

    stalin (Taking a Break)

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    SSD is so much 'faster' than mechanical disks you have no idea. Even from your info above, it states 35,000 IO/ps random/reads. Do you have any idea how many FC/SCSI disks you need to acheive the same figure? We are talking ~100 disks not 5-6.

    Now, that is FAST.

    STR are also massive, especially when you move to enterprise SSD configurations.

    Enterprise have been using SSD for years and years for only one reason. SPEED.
     
  13. proffesso

    proffesso Member

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  14. hapkido

    hapkido Member

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  15. The Bad Egg

    The Bad Egg Member

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    Great idea, pity about the external powerbrick that you need for hyperdrive.
    But they are an interesting company good old HyperOS, does anyone else remember the PCI cards they used to do? 8 or 16 SD ram slots on them from memory.

    BTW, the Gigabyte version of this (DDR ram with a hdd interface) seemed to be more reasonably priced, but not quite as good.

    Hmm, I would pay a bit more than that, but it would be nice to be able to get a small drive- 4GB or so. Thats all I need for winXP (or linux) and give me a little bit of space for d/ling files so that I'm not constantly writing to a 'proper' spinning hdd when I'm d/ling.

    Actually, I wonder how hard it would be to make one of these with flash memory? (I know, not ram, and a limted write cycle thorefore, but flash memory should be at about that pricing level already. I just need to figure out how to build the interface...or is there something I'm missing?
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2007
  16. ADV

    ADV Member

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    I ment FLASH RAM based SSD's as apposed to what the hyperdrive is stating .
     
  17. OP
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    toe2toe

    toe2toe Member

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    Yeah, the same people that bought quad core and 8800GTX SLI setups when they first came out. Unfortunately not many of us have that much spare cash lying around.

    The hyperdrive and i-ram are different, too much hassle to worry about the external power brick and UPS for my liking. They also wouldn't work in a laptop because of the form factor or the need to keep them powered on all the time.

    Me too, it's only a matter of time I suppose. The question being how long. :)
     
  18. leggit

    leggit R.I.P

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    I think I would have to agree with what stalin said. If apple can start making larger solid state ipods it will drive the price of storage down, could be very very handy.

    I would be personally interested when 30+GB drives drop below 1k and have considerable improvements in speed. The idea of serving all my data on a server in another room and using a high end PC with NO moving parts is very appealing to me, being a silence freak and all.
     
  19. OP
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    toe2toe

    toe2toe Member

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    So you'd run the SSD as your OS/boot drive in the main computer and access your bigger files via a network drive/server in another room? That would be pretty sweet provided you have a fast network at home. I reckon you'd need more than 32GB, even 64GB storage on the main PC though for programs, especially if you play games which take up heaps of space..
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2007
  20. SLATYE

    SLATYE SLATYE, not SLAYTE

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    Flash RAM still has the ridiculously short seek time that you get from SDRAM - just without the need to provide backup power. Generally flash drives do have a lower maximum data transfer rate, but it wouldn't be hard to get that up to ~150MB/s (which is the highest that SATA1 can provide, and somewhat quicker than the HyperDrive4). You'd just use internal RAID, combining maybe 20 4GB flash RAM chips into a big RAID0 array (or maybe RAID5, for better reliability in case of a drive failure).

    4GB flash drives = $44. 20x 4GB flash drives = 80GB = $880. Not such a bad price for 80GBs of silent, low-power, high-speed storage. Obviously they're USB, but it shouldn't be long before a manufacturer releases an IDE equivalent.
     

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