[SOLVED] Linux QHD270 Yamakasi/Shimian/Catleap Monitor not working Nvidia Drivers

Discussion in 'Other Operating Systems' started by schmoove, Dec 27, 2015.

  1. schmoove

    schmoove Member

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    Hello all,

    Specs:
    Nvidia Gigabyte GTS 250 http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=3113#sp
    Shimian QHD270-IPSB monitor http://www.swiftworld.net/2012/04/1...omparison-of-the-different-brands-and-models/
    Linux Manjaro/Mint/Crunchbang++/Others

    Problem:
    Purchased Shimian QHD270-IPSB monitor.
    Works in Win 7 :thumbup:
    Works in Linux (various distros) with open source drivers :thumbup:
    Doesn't work in Linux (various distros) with Nvidia drivers :thumbdn:
    Black screen on boot, have to drop into a terminal. X isn't starting.
    Monitor also has problematic EDID.
    I want to use Nvidia drivers.

    Exactly same as outlined here:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2038997

    More information here:
    http://www.codesim.com/tips/index.php?t=3
    http://blog.gatoatigrado.com/2012/08/configuring-crossover-27q-led-p-on.html
    http://learnitwithme.com/wordpress/?p=342 <----- DEAD, but everyone is referencing it
    http://www.overclock.net/t/1215866/...ian-qh270-and-catleap-q270/4760#post_21844392
    http://blog.patshead.com/2013/09/linux-and-the-qnix-qx2710-monitor.html
    https://isotope11.com/blog/getting-...-with-the-nvidia-driver-in-your-xorg-dot-conf

    Solutions tried:
    Every xorg config file I could find that said it was a solution.
    Creating a custom EDID file and having xorg point to it.

    Result
    No change; X doesn't start, have to drop into terminal.

    I've been trying to fix this for days, and I'm tearing my hair out.
    Anyone help?

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2015
  2. ^catalyst

    ^catalyst Member

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    I had the same issue, used to have one at work on kubuntu 14, I sorted it with a combination of edid .bin stuff and xrandr, it was a long time ago though so details are sketchy. It can be done though.
     
  3. flu!d

    flu!d Ubuntu Mate 16.04 LTS

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    What version drivers are you running, are they the latest?

    Do you have another monitor present that you can create an xorg.conf file with via the Nvidia X Server Settings?
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2015
  4. OP
    OP
    schmoove

    schmoove Member

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  5. flu!d

    flu!d Ubuntu Mate 16.04 LTS

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    Drivers are up to the 350 series, see my screenshot below:

    [​IMG]

    What distro are you currently running? I suggest an Debian/Ubuntu/Mint distro at least until you sort this out as it's so easy to update to the latest drivers using PPA.

    If you can connect another monitor and save your X configuration file using the 'Save X to configuration file' button and use the path below you will have a basis to work from. There is a way to do it via terminal, but I'm pushing myself away from terminal.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2015
  6. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    Connecting to it over what medium? DVI-D? HDMI? DP?
     
  7. OP
    OP
    schmoove

    schmoove Member

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    DVI-I

    Didn't get around to working on this tonight.
    Will give it a shot tomorrow night.
     
  8. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Not for old cards. GTS 200 era cards will limit you to the latest 340 series drivers. These are point-release updated for compatibility with new versions of Linux and Xorg, but will not go beyond the 340 major number.

    I would do the following in a Debian (including Ubuntu and Mint) based distro:

    1) Edit /etc/default/grub and set the following:

    Code:
    GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="rdblacklist=nouveau nouveau.nomodeset=0"
    GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="rdblacklist=nouveau nouveau.nomodeset=0"
    
    This will prevent the open source nouveau drivers from running, and blocking the proprietary Nvidia drivers from loading.

    2) Create a file called /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist_nouveau.conf, and have it contain"

    Code:
    blacklist nouveau                                                                                                                                                           
    options nouveau modeset=0              
    
    Make sure it's permissions are set to 0644

    3) Run

    Code:
    sudo update-initramfs -u -k all
    sudo update-grub2
    
    To apply the changes to stick on reboot

    4) Reboot

    5) Re-install the latest 340.XX Nvidia drivers, making sure you select "yes" to the DKMS option (ensure you have the "dkms" package installed via APT). You can force this by running the Nvidia driver installed with the --dkms flag.

    6) Delete your /etc/X11/xorg.conf file

    7) Restart X

    That's generally how I solve all Nvidia-related problems on Debian based distros.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2015
  9. OP
    OP
    schmoove

    schmoove Member

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    Wow Elvis,
    I feel honoured with your input. A proper Linux master!
    Thanks for the tips.
    That seems pretty involved, and I’m not sure what DKMS is, but after having a quick look it seems over my head.
    Whenever I follow a process such as this, my biggest fear is changing things I don’t understand, causing additional issues with the system, and not knowing how to reverse the said changes.
    I’m a bit of a linux n00b.

    I’ll go with attaching an alternative monitor for now, generating an xorg.conf with that, and then using that file as a base for changes, as suggested by flu!d.
    If that fails, then I’ll move on to your solution.
     
  10. flu!d

    flu!d Ubuntu Mate 16.04 LTS

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    Ah, I didn't see GTS250!

    Elvis is the Linux master, if anyone can solve your problem Elvis can. Rumour has it he was trained by Linux Yoda :thumbup:
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2015
  11. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    DKMS = Dynamic Kernel Module Support.

    Linux is a "monolithic kernel", compared to systems like BSD, Windows and Mac that are a "microkernel".

    What this means is that Linux puts a lot of things inside the kernel. This has some advantages (some things [such as encryption or OpenGL] in Linux are much, much faster than other operating systems), but also has some disadvantages, such as requiring drivers to be inside the kernel.

    As the Linux kernel is open source, and licensed under the GPL2, this means that adding non-GPL code to the kernel can be difficult. Often people will include either source code, or binary "blobs" or "stubs" that can link into the kernel.

    This is fine when you first install something like the Nvidia drivers, and the wizard links against your running kernel. But at some later date when a security update comes down and a new kernel gets installed, you're Nvidia drivers won't work on next reboot.

    So DKMS comes along. It keeps a record of all the things you might have added to your kernel after boot. For me, that's often things like Nvidia or ATI drivers, VirtualBox drivers (either for host systems to enable hardware acceleration, or guest additions for VMs). If you've got some really obscure WiFi card that needed proprietary drivers, that could be in there too.

    When the system installs the new drivers, it triggers a call to DKMS, and DKMS re-links all of your extra modules against the new kernel, making it ready to roll on next reboot.

    Don't stress. Linux exposes a lot of it's inner workings to the user more than Windows or Mac. There's a lot less "hidden black magic", as you get to see all the moving parts. That can be a bit daunting at first, but rest assured similar things happen in other OSes, only you don't get to see it in motion as much.

    It's no secret I love Linux. And one of the big reasons I love it so much is that it does a great job of teaching people how computers actually work, rather than just presenting shiny icons on a screen like some dumbed down appliance.

    Again, that can be daunting. And the learning curve can be steep. But a bit of Googling, and some friendly forum posts, and it all becomes very clear very quickly. One of the absolute best things about Linux is the sheer amount of free information and documentation out there, as well as great community resources like the Ubuntu, Gentoo and Arch forums and wikis, all packed full of clear information and good people.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    schmoove

    schmoove Member

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    Thanks for the excellent explanation Elvis.
    Argh, no opportunity to try and sort this again as PC was in use all evening.
    Will hopefully give it a shot tonight.

    Edit: Stupid company dinner (that'll be the eighth one in nine weeks)!
    No time tonight, will try tomorrow.

    Edit: Attached a different monitor, and generated xorg.conf via nvidia-settings

    Code:
    # nvidia-settings: X configuration file generated by nvidia-settings
    # nvidia-settings:  version 340.96  (buildmeister@swio-display-x86-rhel47-05)  Sun Nov  8 22:50:12 PST 2015
    
    Section "ServerLayout"
        Identifier     "Layout0"
        Screen      0  "Screen0" 0 0
        InputDevice    "Keyboard0" "CoreKeyboard"
        InputDevice    "Mouse0" "CorePointer"
        Option         "Xinerama" "0"
    EndSection
    
    Section "Files"
    EndSection
    
    Section "InputDevice"
        # generated from default
        Identifier     "Mouse0"
        Driver         "mouse"
        Option         "Protocol" "auto"
        Option         "Device" "/dev/psaux"
        Option         "Emulate3Buttons" "no"
        Option         "ZAxisMapping" "4 5"
    EndSection
    
    Section "InputDevice"
        # generated from default
        Identifier     "Keyboard0"
        Driver         "kbd"
    EndSection
    
    Section "Monitor"
        # HorizSync source: edid, VertRefresh source: edid
        Identifier     "Monitor0"
        VendorName     "Unknown"
        ModelName      "MST DIGITAL"
        HorizSync       31.5 - 80.0
        VertRefresh     59.9 - 75.0
        Option         "DPMS"
    EndSection
    
    Section "Device"
        Identifier     "Device0"
        Driver         "nvidia"
        VendorName     "NVIDIA Corporation"
        BoardName      "GeForce GTS 250"
    EndSection
    
    Section "Screen"
        Identifier     "Screen0"
        Device         "Device0"
        Monitor        "Monitor0"
        DefaultDepth    24
        Option         "Stereo" "0"
        Option         "metamodes" "1680x1050_60 +0+0"
        Option         "SLI" "Off"
        Option         "MultiGPU" "Off"
        Option         "BaseMosaic" "off"
        SubSection     "Display"
            Depth       24
        EndSubSection
    EndSection
    
    Will now try using relevant parts of xorg from http://www.codesim.com/tips/index.php?t=3 and add it to my xorg.conf file.

    Now trying this xorg.conf

    Code:
    # nvidia-settings: X configuration file generated by nvidia-settings
    # nvidia-settings:  version 340.96  (buildmeister@swio-display-x86-rhel47-05)  Sun Nov  8 22:50:12 PST 2015
    
    Section "ServerLayout"
        Identifier     "Layout0"
        Screen      0  "Screen0" 0 0
        InputDevice    "Keyboard0" "CoreKeyboard"
        InputDevice    "Mouse0" "CorePointer"
        Option         "Xinerama" "0"
    EndSection
    
    Section "Files"
    EndSection
    
    Section "InputDevice"
        # generated from default
        Identifier     "Mouse0"
        Driver         "mouse"
        Option         "Protocol" "auto"
        Option         "Device" "/dev/psaux"
        Option         "Emulate3Buttons" "no"
        Option         "ZAxisMapping" "4 5"
    EndSection
    
    Section "InputDevice"
        # generated from default
        Identifier     "Keyboard0"
        Driver         "kbd"
    EndSection
    
    
    
    Section "Monitor"
        # HorizSync source: edid, VertRefresh source: edid
        Identifier     "Monitor0"
        VendorName     "Unknown"
        ModelName      "MST DIGITAL"
        HorizSync       88.8
        VertRefresh     59.5
        Option         "DPMS"
    	Modeline       "2560x1440" 241.50  2560 2608 2640 2720  1440 1443 1448 1481 +hsync -vsync
        DisplaySize    597 336
    EndSection
    
    
    
    Section "Device"
        Identifier     "Device0"
        Driver         "nvidia"
        VendorName     "NVIDIA Corporation"
        BoardName      "GeForce GTS 250"
    EndSection
    
    
    
    Section "Screen"
        Identifier     "Screen0"
        Device         "Device0"
        Monitor        "Monitor0"
        DefaultDepth    24
        Option         "NoLogo" "True"
        Option         "Stereo" "0"
        Option         "UseEDID" "False"
        Option         "UseEDIDDPI" "False"
        Option         "UseEDIDFreqs" "False"
        Option         "ExactModeTimingsDVI" "True"
        Option         "metamodes" "2560x1440_60 +0 +0, 2560x1440_60 +2560+0"
        Option         "SLI" "Off"
        Option         "MultiGPU" "Off"
        Option         "BaseMosaic" "off"
        SubSection     "Display"
            Depth       24
        EndSubSection
    EndSection
    
    Edit: That didn't work.
    So, I looked /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d and there was a file called 90-mhwd.conf (I think), that was another xorg.conf with different settings.
    mhwd is Manjaro hardware detection.
    On a hunch, I deleted it, rebooted, and success!

    RESOLVED!

    Thanks everybody for your input, and taking the time to read.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2015
  13. flu!d

    flu!d Ubuntu Mate 16.04 LTS

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    Glad you worked it out my friend! Cheers to you!:thumbup:

    Does your desktop look good at 1440p?
     
  14. OP
    OP
    schmoove

    schmoove Member

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    Thanks. Yep looks great!
    Fonts are a bit small, but it's in the lounge, used mostly for media playback, so I'm not too fussed.
    Great monitors these, and very cheap nowadays; I paid the equivalent of $150 AUD for a second hand one with zero defects.
     
  15. synic

    synic Member

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    Can't believe I've found this thread.

    I had my Catleap working with a manual xorg.conf, then updated, new install, didn't work... couldn't get it working and put up with linux driver...

    Now come across this ... :shock:

    Going to try ... :confused:

    will let you know how it goes.
     

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