1. OCAU Merchandise is available! Check out our 20th Anniversary Mugs, Classic Logo Shirts and much more! Discussion in this thread.
    Dismiss Notice

REVIEW SpaceX Starlink

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by Agg, Oct 10, 2021.

  1. Audionut

    Audionut Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2006
    Messages:
    1,529
    Location:
    4610
    Recently moved to an area with only NBN wireless. It's not so bad I guess, for what it is, but tower congestion is a thing and was giving me the shits.

    Que starlink. Upload speeds are poor at only around 25mbps tops, and it also suffers some congestion, and notes that congestion can occur until the network is complete. It still hits over 100mbps when congested, which isn't so bad, but disappointingly not the 250mbps it hits.

    Given I have a Asus router with wan load balancing.... So just before the dish turns up I notice that it doesn't have an Ethernet connection (seriously?), but unlike the dish that spent 2-3 days processing then 9 days shipping, the adapter got here in 3 days and 22.5 hours after hitting the order button, 2 days after the dish. Less than 4 days from LA is impressive.

    Couldn't get HTTPS connections to work initially with the load balancing, but turns out that was just CAKE needing to be disabled.

    Screenshot 2022-06-24 212003.png

    That's from 10 mins ago. Should have got starlink earlier to load balance with the FTTC connection.

    The app is nice too.

    edit: has this been linked yet? Starlink Coverage Tracker
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2022
    yoink, GumbyNoTalent, Agg and 3 others like this.
  2. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2003
    Messages:
    10,527
    Location:
    Briz Vegas
    Agg and others, how well does it perform with cloud cover? In particular thunderstorms?
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Agg

    Agg Lord of the Pings

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2001
    Messages:
    33,765
    Location:
    A Reported Post Near You
    Normal cloud cover isn't an issue but it definitely suffers in heavy rain. During the really insane rain events earlier this year in Sydney we would sometimes lose connectivity entirely for a short time. I don't think lightning/thunder are particularly a concern apart from being associated with rain. I think it's just the physical amount of water between the dish and the satellites, so not much that can be done without a bigger dish I guess.
     
    eva2000 and GumbyNoTalent like this.
  4. Gunna

    Gunna Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2001
    Messages:
    7,960
    Location:
    Brisbane
    We have 15 sites. All are very very remote, not even grid power and phones delivered by Telstra over radio so signed up for Starlink residential at one site 2 weeks ago and Starlink Business for another today.

    Already received the residential hardware despite the site being in the Q1 2023 area on the map. Will report back soon on progress
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2022
  5. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2002
    Messages:
    162,417
    Location:
    Omicron Persei 8
    With over 2,500 SpaceX satellites in orbit now and 42,000 satellites proposed coming in the near future, are our night skies going to be adorned with a Musk Train web of flying lights at night?

     
    eva2000 and JSmithDTV like this.
  6. garnet

    garnet Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2009
    Messages:
    385
    Location:
    3020
    As if you could see it like in the vid… am more concern of the amount of electrical waves blasting through our bodies
     
  7. mesaoz

    mesaoz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2015
    Messages:
    8,380
    Location:
    South East QLD
    Video appears to be long exposure or at least massively boosted judging by how bright the night sky itself is.

    Re electrical waves, not sure if that statement is sincere or not but we are absolutely bathed in electromagnetic radiation 24/7 I highly doubt starlink would be a drop in the bucket compared to what we’re already subjected to with seemingly little impact.
     
  8. Blinky

    Blinky Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2001
    Messages:
    4,168
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Somehow I don’t think they a going to knock off an electron from any of your atoms, but if in doubt keep your tin-foil hat firmly planted. :thumbup:
     
  9. cvidler

    cvidler Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2001
    Messages:
    16,308
    Location:
    Canberra
    It specifically can't do that, that's the difference between non-ionising radiation (radio waves), and ionising radiation (the stuff at the other end of the spectrum that's highly energetic and has the kinetic energy to knock electrons around - xrays, gamma rays). remember of course infrared, visible, and ultra violet light is between those two extremes.

    only way radio waves are dangerous is if they're powerful enough to cause burns via localised heating. and unless you're climbing inside a microwave or up a TV broadcast antenna that's not going to happen.
     
  10. Blinky

    Blinky Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2001
    Messages:
    4,168
    Location:
    Brisbane
    I thought that was self-evident and hence no chance of cell change (cancer). I'll wind my comedy down a notch next time. :)
     
  11. Audionut

    Audionut Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2006
    Messages:
    1,529
    Location:
    4610
    Pathetic photoshopped trees.

    I'm back in the pitch black (hence the starlink), and the only time I've seen a satellite that bright, is the ISS under ideal conditions. The ISS is slightly bigger than a starlink sat.
     
  12. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2002
    Messages:
    162,417
    Location:
    Omicron Persei 8
    Plenty of reports of people seeing them in the night sky, I'm assuming they aren't all using cameras and you can see the trains with the visible eye. Suspect they won't be as big and visible as the video above obviously but what will be visible with the naked eye when 40+ thousand are up there?
     
    JSmithDTV likes this.
  13. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2003
    Messages:
    10,527
    Location:
    Briz Vegas
    Plenty of reports of people seeing UFOs and being probed as well, and one can only assume they are way out in the boonies because light pollution in cities especially mega cities is so bad you can't see the milky way let alone the dim light reflections of a satellite.

    Has Musk watched Quiet Earth?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Quiet_Earth_(film)
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0089869/
    Great 80s NZ SciFi movie.
     
  14. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2002
    Messages:
    162,417
    Location:
    Omicron Persei 8
    :lol: Ok non issue then :thumbup:
     
  15. fnp

    fnp Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2004
    Messages:
    3,314
    Location:
    Wait Awhile
    Thumbs up, one of my fav movies of all time!

    With a bit of luck, Starlink doesn't cause the end of the world eh?
     
  16. rg144

    rg144 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2001
    Messages:
    1,431
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Saw them here Nov last yr, just remembered had an old vid. Poor quality vid sorry.

     
  17. Blinky

    Blinky Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2001
    Messages:
    4,168
    Location:
    Brisbane
    I really wanted to hit thumbs up on that, and I watched it twice but errr umm, were you sure that the odd bright light were starlink?
    The stuff I have seen in the past was before they got to operational height and multiple close together lights. Is that the same thing?
     
  18. rg144

    rg144 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2001
    Messages:
    1,431
    Location:
    Melbourne
    100%, there were a good 2 dozen of them or so, all evenly spaced out. First 15secs of that clip you can see the last 3 in the link (moving up in the middle of the screen, from the bottom), at a good pace.

    Only caught the last ones as the first (rest) were no longer visible /cloud cover
     
    Blinky likes this.
  19. cvidler

    cvidler Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2001
    Messages:
    16,308
    Location:
    Canberra
    They're launched in a string (sounds like what you saw), then they manoeuvre in orbit to their operational positions, which are more dispersed, but will still be the same bright points of light in the sky. for most of us on the planet in cities etc. they won't really be a problem. if you're in a dark location, you'll certainly be able to see them, whether that's a problem or not is personal I guess. Astronomers however are pretty mad about it all. as one microsat passing through their telescopes field of view can ruin an entire nights observations - remember of course they can often need to use multiple hour long exposures, a big bright very close (in relative terms) microsat will overexpose the shot and ruin it.
     
  20. caspian

    caspian Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2002
    Messages:
    12,399
    Location:
    Melbourne
    in my experience, astronomers have been mad about satellites and what they call light pollution for a long time now. to draw a close analogy, they need to deal with the world not revolving around them.
     

Share This Page

Advertisement: