Spyware "Red Shell" found in lots of PC Games

Discussion in 'PC Games' started by ADV, Jun 18, 2018.

  1. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    Unless your employer is government, police etc. currently not likely. However many employers require police checks, or working with vulnerable people/children checks etc. so may not have direct access to that data, but indirect.

    But as gumby says, much easier to track someone's social media presence. so many people just give it away without a care or remuneration (case in point, the amount of amateur porn/nudes there is online).

    Just remember if what you get is (product/service) is free, YOU are the product.
     
  2. havabeer

    havabeer Member

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    but what do they do with the data, say that actually happens, what happens at the end once they've got all the information?
     
  3. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Think like a DB, once all the data is relational, linked by relationships, it easy to build profiles of people based on historical interactions.

    Lets be super obvious, the ISP Metatdata Retention Laws where not about terrorism or finding pedophiles because those people already use encrypted networks, it was driven by MPIAA wanting to track people making it easier to prosecute, and allow the Government more control to filter the sheepelle, and influence their opinions.
     
  4. havabeer

    havabeer Member

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    i still don't see any real world implications of it?

    you think the government (as an example) is looking at the fact i might go on the greens facebook page every 2nd day, and do what? ask facebook to promote their own ads to me... wouldn't they do that anyway...as a blanket... to everyone? that to me sounds like a better way of doing things then trying to find the people thinking about voting against them due to their internet habbits

    other then forcing targeted advertising on me, what are the hard implications on me for all this?
     
  5. chook

    chook Member

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    If the government wants your data then, for the most part, they can get it. The risk in this kind of thing to me is that the more data held in one spot, then bad actors will work to penetrate the defences of that location to take the data and do with it what they want. If I had to get past the perimeter defences of (for example) five places to get one piece from each place I risk detection five times. If I can penetrate one place and get all five pieces then it suddenly becomes a much more appealing target with a much lower risk.

    This is why the security classification of data rises as it is aggregated. One piece of Restricted data is Restricted. One hundred pieces might now be Secret. Before someone goes on about how we aren't talking about national secrets here, I know. This is what they call an example.
     
  6. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    While we have a conservative government (no matter left or right), it's not so much a problem, rouge operators aside (people that abuse their access to the data), but imagine if you replaced our government with the taliban/china/north korea. Now you have the police knocking down your door and shooting you for looking at propaganda that's not friendly to the government - might not even be you, might be your housemate. Extreme example, yes 100% (but reality for many in the world today).

    Once taken, you have no control over your data, you may be ok with it today with the government we have. But if that government changes, they'll have access to it, and you're no longer ok with it, and it's too late to do anything about it.
     
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  7. whatdoesthisdo

    whatdoesthisdo Member

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    smfh.

    No wonder there is no privacy in this age. Bunch of fucking morons.
     
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  8. flain

    flain Member

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    Non consensual data collection that is able to identify you (and this data can as it can be cross-referenced) and can be used for commercial gain, and other commercial purposes = bad. I don't really see why anyone who isn't getting paid would argue otherwise unless they're drinking some kind of cool-aid.
     
  9. havabeer

    havabeer Member

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    other then the kim jon un example of the government kicking down my door for looking at the opposition, i'm still can't see what is this huge negative? i will 100% agree there is NO upside either and given the choice i would choose to not have my data collected
     
  10. PRiME2007

    PRiME2007 Member

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    My guess is somebody is paying the developer to put this in.
    I guess you could use the data to determine information about client machines, but steam does that already and who is getting this data?

    They should definitely be notifying the user of this collection of data upon installing their software... there must be a money incentive.

    Data like this is just another point of exploit for 3rd parties. Thus you shouldn't want it.
     
  11. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    https://cambridgeanalytica.org/
    Do you need anymore examples on how you are influenced because physiologists can dig deeper into your physic and plan out ways to influence you, probably not as critical thinking has been replaced by mass likes, provided you get enough likes you have make the right decision, I weep for the future.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    ADV

    ADV Member

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    Last edited: Jun 20, 2018
  13. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    My point was, it might seem harmless now, with the usage now. But that can change*, and it's too late to do anything about it later. your data is already in databases and will be forever more.


    *
    Yes we live in a society with protections in place for privacy, but those keep getting eroded in the name of terrorists, war on drugs, peadophiles etc. and that's all bullshit excuses, the government is wanting more and more of our data, and any excuse will do.
    What's to stop a cash strapped government selling that data in the future, like they sell off other public assets.
    Change of government
    Change of policy
    Theft of the data (it's being collected by ISPs, there's multiple attack points between them and the eventual end user, we can't trust the government to keep medicare records secret)
    Unauthorised use of the data (this has already happened, a AFP officer with legitimate access to the data, was found to be browsing more than the warrant allowed for).
    At least there's some written in law safeguards for the governments collection/use of our data, there's very little in the way of safeguarding data collected by private companies.
     
  14. KriiV

    KriiV Member

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    Genuine question... Is this not allowed for somewhere in the games terms of use? Surely... If so, they have consent.
     
  15. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    https://panopticlick.eff.org/
    Finally found the bookmark, here you can test how they fingerprint your computer / browser and if you have adequate blockers.
     
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  16. ^catalyst

    ^catalyst Member

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  17. Nerb

    Nerb Member

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    There is an upside... game developers know what type of pc their users have and can optimise... adverts are more likely for something you are interested instead of wasting your time and bandwidth.
    If these outweigh the negatives (lol, not likely) is another question.
     
  18. Perko

    Perko Member

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    The only optimisation that they would consider is less options in the graphics settings though. There are plenty of hardware surveys that studios can use to work out when they can safely disregard a certain level of hardware.
    I just think that there's a culture of casual datamining now amongst private companies that needs a hit on the head; hopefully the new EU rules will at least make companies consider whether it's worth the effort, because they've just been doing it as a force of habit with no real reason. Steam's data is freely available at a level of detail that would tell a developer plenty.
     
  19. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    Correct, we don't need yet another service collecting the same data + uniquely identifying data (steam id, fingerprinting your browser and installed fonts etc.)

    And being a for-profit organsiation, if it was genuinely useful to the end user, they wouldn't be hiding it, they'd use it as a selling point.
    "buy game X, and get customised graphics profiles to optimise quality and performance for YOUR PC!!!!!"
     
  20. Perko

    Perko Member

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    Unless they're Nvidia lol.
     

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