Storage solutions, purchase NAS or build something?

Discussion in 'Storage & Backup' started by Drunkmunky, Nov 15, 2018.

  1. s4mmy

    s4mmy Member

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    Seems retarded, but i have two Synologys. A 6 bay and a 4 bay and love them both.

    6 Bay - 2 Disk Pools
    3x 8TB Pool1- Data
    3x 10TB Pool2 - CCTV Footage

    4 Bay - 1 Disk Pool
    4x 3TB Drives - Backup

    6 Bay is the 'primary' NAS, anything important like photos and work\personal files gets replicated to the 4 bay.

    Works well, only reason i did it was i got a cheap DS412+ on here and had the 3TB drives spare.
     
  2. davros123

    davros123 Member

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    mother of god 30TB for CCTV. That's 4-6 months worth. What cams are you running?
     
  3. jonsey

    jonsey Member

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    I outgrew my microserver so I did the old server route off Ebay. Picked up an acer at310 f2 for $150. Has an e3-1240 xeon with 16 gig ram. Threw in an ssd and 7 drives. It has been going gangbusters for awhile now.
     
  4. s4mmy

    s4mmy Member

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  5. davros123

    davros123 Member

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  6. DarkYendor

    DarkYendor Member

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    I didn't find the video overly convincing. The camera on the left had a bitrate of 15Mbps, camera on the right only had 9Mbps. Of course there's going to be a difference in quality.
     
  7. s4mmy

    s4mmy Member

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    I've just been using some extra IR lights where i need better at night.

    Back to the NAS though.

    Cant go wrong with a Synology or a QNAP.
    Id recommend WD-RED or Ironwolf drives for sure though.
     
  8. DarkYendor

    DarkYendor Member

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    Not WD Purple/Seagate SkyHawk?
     
  9. s4mmy

    s4mmy Member

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    I dont have much experience with the Purples, i guess it depends on your work loads. If its purely CCTV then sure.
    I've never had an issue with the Reds so have stuck to them.
     
  10. h0mer_

    h0mer_ Member

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    I've snipped some of NSanity's post - because what's not been mentioned at all yet is access to tech-support... Something that Synology seems to do well for when their NAS owners end up with a bjorked NAS.

    Over the years I've observed countless users posting on the Synology forums for help because of bjorked boxes from upgrades, hardware failures & user errors. Many people have reported great success with Synology engineers remote logging in to their NASs and fixing whatever issue/s the user had. Sure, there's also been multiples of users posting that Synology ignored/fuxoored/hacked their boxes as well, but that happens on the forums.

    Personally, my 1812 hasn't missed a beat for the 5 odd years that I've had it. It's been powered on 24/7/364.9 in that time. Being powered down for the odd clean and hard drive upgrade.

    And how good is that tech-support remote log-in capability?

    Earlier in the year I was swapping some older drives for new ones, and the array rebuild process takes around 40 hours per drive. During the rebuild of the last drive I stupidly rebooted the box and when it came back up it politely told me that the array was rooted (& and not in the permission sense...). After a couple of days of looking around every Internet forum and post on what to do with this type of array error (Linux aint a strong point here!) I was becoming resigned to everything being lost - around 14TBs. I had found a couple of posts that resembled my issue and the posters had reported success with using those commands to fix their issue. However, if I started down that road, I'd probably only be digging a deeper hole.

    Heeding caution, and with the knowledge that I'd witness countless other Synology customers report success with using their tech-support I thought that I didn't have anything to lose by logging a support ticket...

    Ticket logged Friday evening and a Synology engineer replied mid Monday afternoon, asking me to activate the remote assistance feature in the NAS OS, open up the router ports, etc, etc.

    After doing that and within 30 minutes of advising the engineer via return email he was logged in and looking around the file system.

    Another 20-30 minutes and I had noticed that the OS was now saying the array was rebuilding! He had managed to fix the bjorked file system config and effectively restarted the array rebuild that was interrupted with the reboot.

    I was unbelievably impressed! He did tell me later that he had thought all hope with it was lost when he first logged in, and had called upon a fellow engineer for advice and input. He said they both thought it was a crap-shoot and were surprised to see it start rebuilding.

    40 hours later the rebuild finished. Then another 40 hours for the expand. And then I could start to see if there was any corruption. Nope, nothing. The reported array sizes looked correct and I was able to put a major stuff-up behind me. To say I was relieved is a massive understatement.

    Cost of the DS1812+ when I brought it - ~$1500 iirc (drives don't matter as whatever you, drives are needed).
    Cost for above tech-support ticket to be resolved - $nil.

    If I'd had a home-brew system would I have been able to recover the file system myself? Dunno. Possibly. Probably not.

    tl-dr:
    The tech-support Synology provide is first-rate & something that an end-user might need and make the difference between successful data retention/recovery and total data loss.
    Worth adding into the conversation.
     

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