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The Australian Synchrotron

Discussion in 'Science' started by Goth, May 11, 2010.

  1. Goth

    Goth Grumpy Member

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    The RF resonant cavity in the booster synchrotron. RF power is fed into the cavity from the waveguide at the ceiling.


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    One of the beamline instruments; this one is the soft x-ray beamline.


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    Some quadrupole and dipole magnets on the beamline between the linac and the booster. Looking towards the background in this image we have the linac and the electron gun.


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    (Part of) the control room. Note that the beam current is 0 mA; at this point we have no beam circulating in the storage ring.


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    More control room.


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    More of the quadrupole magnets, again on the beampipe connecting the linac to the booster synchrotron.


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    The electron gun, at the base of the linac.
    Yes, that's a bloody great ceramic insulator - the electron gun is injecting at 60 keV, the cathode is at -60 kV relative to ground.


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    The control room, again. We've now got beam injection into the ring started, as you can see, with the beam at 50 mA at this point.

    No pictures inside the storage ring itself unfortunately, because we had a beam injected back into the storage ring before we had a chance to go in there, and there is too much radiation from the magnets while there is a stored beam... so you'll just have to settle for the linac and the booster.

    I will see if I can find some more images later :)
     
  2. Zylatis

    Zylatis Member

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    Awesome! Now go get pics from CERN =P
     
  3. swamp rat

    swamp rat Member

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    shit goth, you work at the synchroton?

    I was on the SAXS beamline early last year. Still got my swipe card hanging around. Some damn good coffee in the break room
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Goth

    Goth Grumpy Member

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    I was just visiting. I would like to investigate job opportunities there though, since I like applied particle physics, I want a job, and I live in Melbourne. :)

    Their coffee machine did look all right, but I didn't use it. :)
     
  5. Arbite

    Arbite Member

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    8 more months till I get to head up there.
     
  6. eXponential

    eXponential Member

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    Nice shots there. I ran some experiments on the XAS beamline at the end of '08. It's quite impressive and a huge advance for Australian science. It will be interesting when the medical imaging beamline is up and running, the AS will be one of only a few places in the world that offer such a service.

    Coffee's better at Opal anyway :p
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Goth

    Goth Grumpy Member

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    Yeah, the construction of the medical imaging and radiotherapy beamline seems to be coming along quite nicely, which is interesting. :)
     
  8. Amran

    Amran Member

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    Medical imaging...does this thing tie into nuclear medicine somehow? Could you tell us a bit more about that?
     
  9. holdennutta

    holdennutta Member

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    Nuclear Medicine is a modality of medical imaging. Medical imaging is simply the term used to describe the various methods of taking pictures of the insides of people.

    The synchrotron produced radiation offers extremely attractive properties for medical imaging that would provide imaging quality far above what is available today with conventional radiography. We'll be able to do cool stuff like k-edge subtraction which will negate the use of normal iodinated intravenous contrast (in a lot of cases) used today which will be good for all the people will iodine allergies which are put at risk by its administration.

    We can build tomography units which will have resolutions of down to about a micro meter instead of the usual 0.5mm on your normal CT's today.

    There's a whole bunch of other funky stuff that's been fiddled with in Japan (predominantly) and a few other places around the world. The size & cost of the facilities required to produce this radiation is prohibitively huge enough that I don't see them being used in any mass way for a VERY long time. And even then, the sources will possibly be reverse compton scatterers or something similar and not synchrotrons + storage rings.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Goth

    Goth Grumpy Member

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    Nuclear medicine typically means we're using radionuclides in the patient... this isn't nuclear medicine.

    There are two things that a synchrotron lightsource can be really useful to help us do better - medical imaging, like CT scan type things but better, and radiotherapy, using beams of radiation to attack cancers and things like that.

    See the above post :)

    In general, you can do a lot of cool stuff with X-rays but you're limited in practice by technical limits to how much power you can get out of an X-ray tube for a sustained period of time. Synchrotron light sources get around that problem. :)

    How does iodine K-edge subtraction work without giving the patient any iodine?
    I thought you still had to use an iodinated contrast, but with K-edge subtraction, you're getting much better images, usually with less contrast agent?

    But if you don't administer any iodine, how does it work at all? You're dealing with the K-edge of what element?

    Interesting stuff :)
     
  11. Amran

    Amran Member

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    Indeed! Thanks for the replies, when I first saw this device I was thinking it might be similar to a cyclotron and that it might be used for making exotic or low half-life radionuclides.

    So based on using this for radiotherapy and for getting around the limits of an X-ray tube, I'm guessing there are some high energy rays bouncing around in here? What kind of dose would a patient be looking at for a session of radiotherapy or one of those micron resolution CT's?
     
  12. Blinky

    Blinky Member

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    Damien Fleming on the Australian Synchrotron. (on behalf of TV show Thank God You're Here) :D


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sWewLIgdwGI

     
  13. OP
    OP
    Goth

    Goth Grumpy Member

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    No, it's not like an accelerator like that accelerating particles like protons or deuterons to react with nuclei.

    It's a synchrotron light source, it produces intense, highly polarized beams of electromagnetic radiation, from IR to visible light to hard x-rays.
     
  14. holdennutta

    holdennutta Member

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    Bah, you're right :) It was late and my brain = fried haha. I was getting confused between simple dual energy imaging and actual K-edge fanciness. You're right, the novel iodine K-edge stuff will use much reduced doses of iodinated contrast than is possible currently.

    Current x-ray tubes are pretty inaccurate in what energy they output. Generally, you'll get a pretty wide spectrum of energies, some (but not much) of which are filtered out in the tube itself by adding a couple of mm of Al. It's still very scrappy compared to the coherent tuned energies of a SLS.

    Synchrotron light is great because you can tune to two specific energies of output photons. One just above the K-edge and one just below. You essentially get two (the mask and the normal) images in one shot rather than traditions DSA where you need a mask image pre-con which is then used to subtract on every subsequent image taken which means there is a huge space for movement based error in the final image.

    From what I remember, KES is looking pretty awesome for coronary angio where movement based error proves rather troublesome ;)

    Dose for this type of radiation isn't quite as much as you would expect. Infact it is lower than conventional radiography in some cases. The reason this source is so tempting is that it's so controllable. Energy can be more accurately set, it isn't a divergent beam so you can steer it accurately (VERY handy for aiming radiation at only certain parts of the brain for radiotherapy).

    Also: This is my final year radiography project I did on SLS radiation in diagnostic radiography. It's nothing special (procrastinated for ages and had to do it quick!) but for anyone interested in that side of things it'll give you a reasonable overview I think. There's some formatting gone missing from the conversion from docx to pages to pdf though I think.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2010

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